Earl Hines
Jazz pianist
Earl Hines
Earl Kenneth Hines, universally known as Earl "Fatha" Hines, was an American jazz pianist. Hines was one of the most influential figures in the development of modern jazz piano and, according to one major source, is "one of a small number of pianists whose playing shaped the history of jazz".
Biography
Earl Hines's personal information overview.
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Louis Armstrong: Ambassador of Jazz Box – review - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Bessie Smith's majestic weariness, cajoled and coaxed by Armstrong's trumpet on St Louis Blues; the famously blazing unaccompanied opening of West End Blues; the canny hipness of the Weatherbird duet with pianist Earl Hines – are all turning moments in
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A Carpi gli Oci Dok - Sassuolo 2000
Google News - over 5 years
Si è avvicinato al jazz attraverso l'ascolto di grandi maestri dello strumento, da Earl Hines a Bud Powell sino a Bill Evans, ed è un artista in fase di costante crescita, attualmente orientato verso una sintesi della grande tradizione che va dal bebop
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Curia Diocesana di Savona-Noli: bollettino del 1° agosto 2011 - Savona news
Google News - over 5 years
... ai giorni nostri con composizioni jazz originali di Joanna e Riccardo, tutto ciò ispirato dai “veri” grandi del jazz come Bix Beiderbecke, Fletcher Henderson, Earl Hines, Harold Arlen, Cole Porter, Ellington, Benny Golson, Gershwin, Monk, Mingus
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Le Grand Ahmad Jamal en concert à Foix - ariegeNews.com
Google News - over 5 years
Né à Pittsburgh (formidable vivier de musiciens comme Kenny Clark, Art Blakey, Earl Hines) en Pennsylvanie le 2 juillet 1930, le jazzman a commencé le piano à l'âge de 3 ans. Puis il prend des cours. On dit qu'à huit ans, il interprétait Chopin, Liszt,
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Se andate a New York..guida ai Club di Jazz (Part I) - Linkiesta.it (Blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Miles Davis,Ben Webster, Monk, Earl Hines, Fats Waller... e chi più ne ha più ne metta era la 52a strada. non reca più traccia del suo folgorante passato. ea quella strada Monk ha dedicato una "sigla", "the 52nd street theme". il pianista Bud Powell e
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Louis Armstrong, un legado musical en ascenso - Milenio.com
Google News - over 5 years
En el último periodo de los Hot Five, con Earl Hines, la banda sí tocó en público con una instrumentación expandida. Sin embargo, en los primeros años fueron estrictamente bandas para grabación. ¿Piensa que estas grabaciones son las mejores de
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Insight Cuba Announces HAVANA JAZZ EXPERIENCE - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
Among the passengers were Earl Hines, David Amram, Stan Getz and Dizzy Gillespie. "When we got off the ship, we could see a large crowd waiting at the dock and people were chanting 'Dizzy, Dizzy, Dizzy...'", recalls Sabin. "It was wild
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Lonely Voyage of Player,Piano and Audience
NYTimes - over 5 years
CRAIG TABORN was deep into a solo expedition one recent evening at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan, seeming for all the world like someone cracking a secret code. Poised for action at a grand piano, he disrupted an expectant stillness with a turbulent digression. With his left hand he formed the lopsided bass-clef vamp of a piece called
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Lonely Voyage of Player, Piano and Audience - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
The following decade brought solo pianism ranging from the terse economy of Teddy Wilson to the sparkling fullness of Earl Hines. And then there was Art Tatum, a solo pianist of such spectacular authority that many would argue he has yet to be
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Diana Krall on all that jazz - Montreal Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Her other heroes included Nat King Cole, Teddy Wilson and Earl Hines, all of who influenced her innate ability to establish rhythm (albeit her inimitable languorous rhythm). Her preferred format - piano, guitar, bass - comes straight from Cole's famous
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Serious standards, Diana Krall style - Montreal Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Her other heroes included Nat King Cole, Teddy Wilson and Earl Hines, all of whom influenced her innate ability to establish rhythm (albeit her inimitable languorous rhythm). Her preferred format – piano, guitar, bass – comes straight from Cole's
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Louis Armstrong buys a cornet - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Weather Bird, a duet recorded in the same year with the pianist Earl Hines, opened up the possibility of jazz as intimate conversation. The big band recordings made in Los Angeles at the start of the 30s represented an artful approach to the popular
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TRIVIA: Bug exterminating important part of dad's job - STLtoday.com
Google News - over 5 years
What was the nickname of jazz pianist Earl Hines? 3. What are the first and last names of Chevy Chase's head of the household character in "National Lampoon's Vacation" and its sequels? 4. Who was called "The Father of the Nuclear Navy"? 5
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Happy Birthday Les Paul: Celebrating the Artistry of a Gibson Genius - Gibson
Google News - over 5 years
Innovative pianists Art Tatum, Earl Hines and Nat Cole, as well as trumpeter Roy Eldridge, became his musical running partners. He became even more steeped in African-American music when he recorded 20 songs with blues singer Georgia White in 1936 and
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Jazztrummisen 'Bert' Dahlander är död - Sveriges Radio
Google News - over 5 years
Längre engagemang fick han i Teddy Wilsons och Earl Hines grupper. – Han var en av de allra första som lyckades i USA. Exakt hur han gjorde vet jag inte, men han var ju en kille som kunde snacka med folk och det finns historier om att han helt enkelt
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Barrie's got the blues - The Barrie Advance
Google News - over 5 years
This years Giant of Jazz lineup includes The Mark Eisenman Trio performing Listen To Your Fatha with music by Earl Hines on June 10; The Fern Lindzon Trio performing The First Lady Of Jazz with music by Mary Lou Williams on June 11; The Skyliners
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'Treme,' Ep. 16: A Village On An Island - NPR (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
I won't spend much time elaborating on the trumpet cadenza, the totally hip vocal or the equally impressive solo chorus from pianist Earl Hines. Let's just call it what it is: music for the ages. PJ: Batiste brings up this big point about cultural
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For the love of music - Daily American Online
Google News - over 5 years
So, here's to George Benson, Harold Betters, Art Blakey, Ray Brown, Sonny Clark, Johnny Costa, Billy Eckstine, Roy Eldridge, Erroll Garner, Slide Hampton, Walt Harper, Earl Hines, Roger Humphries, Ahmad Jamal, Jessica Lee, Billy Strayhorn,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Earl Hines
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1983
    Age 79
    Died on April 22, 1983.
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  • 1976
    Age 72
    Both of Hines' daughters died before him: Tosca in 1976 and Janear in 1981. Janie divorced him on June 14, 1979.
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  • 1975
    Age 71
    In 1975, Hines was the subject of an hour-long television documentary film made by ATV (for Britain's commercial ITV channel), out-of-hours at the Blues Alley nightclub in Washington, DC.
    More Details Hide Details The International Herald Tribune described it as "The greatest jazz film ever made". In the film, Hines said, "The way I like to play is that... I'm an explorer, if I might use that expression, I'm looking for something all the time... almost like I'm trying to talk." He played solo at Duke Ellington's funeral, played sole twice in the White House, for the President of France and for The Pope. Of this acclaim, Hines said, "Usually they give people credit when they're dead. I got my flowers while I was living". Hines' last show took place in San Francisco a few days before he died in Oakland. As he had wished, his Steinway was auctioned for the benefit of gifted low-income music students, still bearing its silver plaque: Hines was buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Oakland, California.
  • 1968
    Age 64
    He toured South America in 1968 and then added Asia, Australia, Japan and, in 1966, the Soviet Union to his list of State Department-funded destinations.
    More Details Hide Details During his 6-week and 35-concert Soviet Union tour, the 10,000-seat Kiev Sports Palace was sold out. As a result, the Kremlin cancelled his Moscow and Leningrad concerts as being "too culturally dangerous". Arguably still playing as well as he ever had, Hines displayed individualistic quirks (including grunts) in these performances. He sometimes sang as he played, especially his own, "They Didn't Believe I Could Do It... Neither Did I".
  • 1966
    Age 62
    Down Beat also elected him the world's "No. 1 Jazz Pianist" in 1966 (and did so again five further times).
    More Details Hide Details Jazz Journal awarded his LPs of the year first and second in their overall poll and first, second and third in their piano category. Jazz voted him "Jazzman of the Year", voted him their no. 1 and no. 2 in their piano recordings category and he was on Johnny Carson's and Mike Douglas' TV shows.
  • 1964
    Age 60
    From 1964 on, Hines often toured Europe, especially France.
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    Between his 1964 "come-back" and up to when he died, Hines recorded over 100 LPs all over the world.
    More Details Hide Details Within the industry, he became legendary for going into a studio and coming out an hour-and-a-half later having recorded an unplanned solo LP. Retakes were almost unheard of except when Hines wanted to try a tune again in some, often completely, "other way".
    Then, in 1964, thanks to Stanley Dance, Hines' determined friend and unofficial manager, Hines was "suddenly rediscovered" following a series of recitals at The Little Theatre in New York that Dance had cajoled him into.
    More Details Hide Details They were the first piano recitals Hines had ever given; they caused a sensation. "What is there left to hear after you've heard Earl Hines?", asked The New York Timess John Wilson. Hines then won the 1966 "International Critics Poll" for Down Beat Magazine's "Hall of Fame".
  • FIFTIES
  • 1954
    Age 50
    In 1954, he toured his then seven-piece group nationwide with the Harlem Globetrotters, but, at the start of the jazz-lean 1960s and old enough to retire, Hines settled "home" in Oakland, California, with his wife and two young daughters, Janear and Tosca, opened a tobacconist's, and came close to giving up the profession.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1951
    Age 47
    Armstrong said of the difficulties, mainly over billing, "Hines and his ego, ego, ego." but after 3 years and to Armstrong's annoyance, in 1951 Hines left the All-Stars.
    More Details Hide Details Next, back as leader again, Hines took his own small combos around the States. He started with a markedly more modern line-up than the ageing "All Stars": Bennie Green, Art Blakey, Tommy Potter, Etta Jones.
  • 1948
    Age 44
    In early 1948, Hines joined up again with Armstrong in what became the "Louis Armstrong and his All-Stars" 'small-band'.
    More Details Hide Details It was not without its strains for Hines. A year later, Armstrong became the first jazz musician to appear on the cover of Time Magazine (on February 21, 1949). Armstrong was by then on his way to becoming an American icon, leaving Hines to feel he was now being used as only a sideman in comparison to his old friend.
  • 1947
    Age 43
    In 1947, Hines bought the biggest nightclub in Chicago, The El Grotto, but it soon foundered with Hines losing $30,000 ($ today).
    More Details Hide Details The big-band era was over – Hines had had his for 20 years.
    Hines then married Janie Moses in 1947 and they had two daughters, Janear (born 1950) and Tosca.
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  • 1946
    Age 42
    In July 1946, Hines received serious head injuries in a car crash near Houston which, despite an operation, affected his eyesight for the rest of his life.
    More Details Hide Details Back on the road again four months later, he continued to lead his big band for two more years.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1943
    Age 39
    Apart from Parker and Gillespie, other Hines 'modernists' included Gene Ammons, Gail Brockman, Scoops Carry, Goon Gardner, Wardell Gray, Bennie Green, Benny Harris, Harry 'Pee-Wee' Jackson, Shorty McConnell, Cliff Smalls, Shadow Wilson and Sarah Vaughan, who replaced Eckstine as the band singer in 1943 and stayed for a year.
    More Details Hide Details Dizzy Gillespie, in the Hines band at the time, said: The links to bebop remained close. Parker's discographer, among others, has argued that "Yardbird Suite", which Parker recorded with Miles Davis in March 1946, was in fact based on Hines' "Rosetta", which nightly served as the Hines band theme-tune. Dizzy Gillespie described the Hines band, saying, "We had a beautiful, beautiful band with Earl Hines. He's a master and you learn a lot from him, self-discipline and organization."
  • 1940
    Age 36
    As early as 1940, saxophone player and arranger Budd Johnson had "re-written the book" for the Hines' band in a more modern style.
    More Details Hide Details Johnson and Billy Eckstine, Hines vocalist between 1939 and 1943, have been credited with helping to bring modern players into the Hines band in the transition between swing and bebop.
    They stayed together till 1940 when Hines "divorced" her to marry Ann Jones Reed, but this was soon "indefinitely postponed".
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  • 1935
    Age 31
    Perry recorded several times with Hines, including "Body & Soul" in 1935.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1928
    Age 24
    On December 28, 1928 (so on his 25th birthday and six weeks before the Saint Valentine's Day massacre) the always-immaculate Hines opened at Chicago's Grand Terrace Cafe leading his own big band, the pinnacle of jazz ambition at the time. "All America was dancing", Hines said, and for the next 12 years and through the worst of the Great Depression and Prohibition, Hines' band was "The Orchestra" at The Grand Terrace.
    More Details Hide Details The Hines Orchestra – or 'Organization' as Hines preferred it – had up to 28 musicians and did three shows a night at The Grand Terrace, four shows every Saturday and sometimes Sundays. According to Stanley Dance, "Earl Hines and The Grand Terrace were to Chicago what Duke Ellington and The Cotton Club were to New York - but fierier." The Grand Terrace was controlled by Al Capone, so Hines became Capone's "Mr Piano Man" with the Grand Terrace upright piano soon replaced by a white $3,000 Bechstein grand. Talking about those days Hines later said: From The Grand Terrace, Hines and his band broadcast on "open mikes" over many years, sometimes seven nights a week, coast-to-coast across America – Chicago being well placed to deal with the U.S. live-broadcasting time-zone problem. Hines' became the most broadcast band in America. Among his listeners were a young Nat "King" Cole and Jay McShann in Kansas City, who said his "real education came from Earl Hines. When 'Fatha' went off the air, I went to bed." But Hines' most significant "student" was Art Tatum.
    In 1928, he recorded with Noone (14 sides), then again with Armstrong (for a total of 38 sides with Armstrong), and recorded his first piano solos late in 1928: eight for QRS Records in New York then seven for Okeh Records in Chicago, all except two his own compositions.
    More Details Hide Details Hines moved in with Kathryn Perry (with whom he had recorded "Sadie Green The Vamp of New Orleans"). Hines said of Perry that, "She'd been at The Sunset too, in a dance act. She was a very charming, pretty girl. She had a good voice and played the violin. I had been divorced and she became my common-law wife. We lived in a big apartment and her parents stayed with us".
  • 1927
    Age 23
    Armstrong and Hines became good friends and shared a car. Armstrong joined Hines in Carroll Dickerson's band at the Sunset Cafe. In 1927, this became Armstrong's band under the musical direction of Hines.
    More Details Hide Details Later that year, Armstrong revamped his Okeh Records recording-only band, Louis Armstrong's Hot Five and replaced his wife Lil Hardin Armstrong on piano with Hines. Armstrong and Hines then recorded what are often regarded as some of the most important jazz records ever made. The Sunset Cafe closed in 1927. Hines, Armstrong and drummer Zutty Singleton agreed that they would become "The Unholy Three" – they would "stick together and not play for anyone unless the three of us were hired". But as 'Louis Armstrong and his Stompers' (with Hines as musical director and the premises rented in Hines' name), they ran into difficulties trying to establish their own venue, the Warwick Hall Club. Hines went briefly to New York and returned to find that Armstrong and Singleton had re-joined their now-rival Carroll Dickerson's band at the new The Savoy Ballroom in his absence, leaving Hines feeling "warm". When Armstrong and Singleton later asked him to join them with Dickerson at The Savoy Ballroom, Hines said, "No, you guys left me in the rain and broke the little corporation we had".
  • 1925
    Age 21
    In 1925, after much family debate, Hines moved to Chicago, Illinois.
    More Details Hide Details The city was then the world's jazz capital, home to Jelly Roll Morton and King Oliver. Hines started in The Elite no. 2 Club but soon joined Carroll Dickerson's band, with whom he also toured on the Pantages Theatre Circuit to Los Angeles and back. Then, in the poolroom at Chicago's Black Musicians' Union, Local 208 on State & 39th, Hines met Louis Armstrong. Hines was 21, Armstrong 24. They played together at the Union piano. Armstrong was astounded by Hines's avant-garde "trumpet-style" piano-playing, often using dazzlingly fast octaves so that on none-too-perfect upright pianos (and with no amplification) "they could hear me out front". Richard Cook writes in the Jazz Encyclopedia that:
  • TEENAGE
  • 1921
    Age 17
    In 1921 Hines and Deppe became the first African Americans ever to perform on radio and, still in the very early days of recordings, Hines' first recordings were accompanying Deppe – four sides recorded with Gennett Records in 1923.
    More Details Hide Details Only two of these were issued, one of which was a Hines' composition, "Congaine", "a keen snappy foxtrot", which also featured a Hines solo. Hines entered the studio again with Deppe a month later to record spirituals and popular songs, including "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child" and "For the Last Time Call Me Sweetheart".
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1903
    Born
    Earl Hines was born in Duquesne, Pennsylvania, 12 miles from Pittsburgh city center, in 1903.
    More Details Hide Details His father, Joseph Hines, played cornet and was leader of Pittsburgh's Eureka Brass Band, his stepmother a church organist. Hines intended to follow his father on cornet but "blowing" hurt him behind the ears while the piano did not. The young Hines took classical piano lessons and by the age of eleven he was playing the organ in his local Baptist church but he also had a "good ear and a good memory" and could re-play songs and numbers he heard in theaters and park 'concerts': "I'd be playing songs from these shows months before the song copies came out. That astonished a lot of people and they'd ask where I heard these numbers and I'd tell them at the theatre where my parents had taken me." Later, Hines said that he was playing piano around Pittsburgh "before the word 'jazz' was even invented".
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