Earl Long
American politician
Earl Long
Earl Kemp Long was an American politician and the 45th Governor of Louisiana for three non-consecutive terms. Long termed himself the "last of the red hot poppas" of politics, referring to his stump-speaking skills. He served from 1939–1940, 1948–1952, and 1956–1960. He was also lieutenant governor, having served from 1936–1939, but he failed in three other bids to be elected lieutenant governor. In 1932, he lost to state House Speaker John B.
Biography
Earl Long's personal information overview.
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Borough council supports preservation of Stewartstown Railroad - York Daily Record
Google News - over 5 years
Earl Long, member of the Stewartstown planning commission, said a survey conducted as part of the borough's comprehensive plan found 67 percent of local residents are in favor of preserving the railroad as an operational line
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Red Sox Pregame Show - WEEI.com
Google News - over 5 years
All of those guys had been Earl Long. That's how they were so good in June July. May June July. 'cause they had all of those guys in the lineup not everybody is going to be clicking on all cylinders at the same time. But they've already had a couple of
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Curtis: Provo residents already pay for iProvo debt - Salt Lake Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
Provo • For Earl Long, plans to bill every city resident to cover the iProvo network's debt bring back memories of military boot camp. "When one guy screwed up, the whole company got in trouble," Long said
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New series by Sara Gran intriguing mystery - Monroe News Star
Google News - over 5 years
... in New Orleans: Adventures in Adolescence" with Arthur Hardy Enterprises. The University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press has published Jason Berry's play in two acts, "Earl Long in Purgatory," which includes Barry's essay "The Madness of Earl Long."
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Overland Park 2012 Budget Public Hearing - Kansas Watchdog
Google News - over 5 years
09:36 Earl Long: “I come here to offer two suggestions: one is a cost savings idea you may not have looked at, and the other is a suggestion you might want to look and make sure that you're not providing too much services that we don't want
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Disgraced ex-US governor, 83, marries prison pen pal, 32 - Stuff.co.nz
Google News - over 5 years
... who performed the wedding ceremony, and her husband, former state Rep Clyde Kimball. Edwards, who also served in Congress, brought charisma and power to state politics that rivalled that of Louisiana's other favourite populist sons, Huey and Earl Long
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Mellowhype – Blackenedwhite Reissue - The Silver Tongue
Google News - over 5 years
Case in point: Earl's long-gone, Frank Ocean's releasing music on Def Jam, and most importantly, Tyler's fuck-it approach only barely worked in terms of continuously marketing his own music. It certainly cannot carry their music as well
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Stewartstown RR holds open houses to garner support, donations - York Daily Record
Google News - over 5 years
The Stewartstown Railroad is the last surviving railroad in the United States that operates under its original charter, said Earl Long, former chairman of the Stewartstown Planning Commission. The railroad began in 1884. Long, 71, said the railroad is
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How accurate are fortune cookies? - Daily Comet
Google News - over 5 years
Winnfield is his hometown, as well as the hometown of his brother and former governor Earl Long and former governor Oscar Allen. You could just tell you were in a different region culturally. The people had funny accents, of course
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Closing the file after 47 years - Tri Parish Times
Google News - over 5 years
Earl Long was governor of Louisiana in 1950 and consolidation of the City of Houma and Terrebonne Parish governments was still three decades away. "I got to looking at the calendar and doing some arithmetic," Boudreaux said. "I got to thinking,
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ON POLITICS - Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Google News - over 5 years
The late political columnist William Safire recounted that when Earl Long, the colorful former governor of Louisiana, was asked about an angry group of constituents demanding that he fulfill a campaign promise, he instructed his deputy,
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He's gonna do bad things to you - Creative Loafing Atlanta
Google News - over 5 years
Sookie's offered a fruit, but before she eats it notices her grandaddy Earl, long since disappeared. Earl doesn't recognize her because, well, it's been 20 years since they last saw each other. Only this is news to him - Earl thinks he's been gone just
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Encountering Heaven and the Afterlife - Canada Free Press
Google News - over 5 years
Earl's long-lost cat Puff came scurrying up behind. As Earl reached out to meet them he spotted his sister Margi, with both legs perfectly okay and working fine—even though she had died with only one leg
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Desmond's - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Eat one and it's as if you are Earl Long looking at Blaze Starr for the first time. Desmond's takes seriously the mandate to comfort the comfortable while avoiding the afflicted entirely. Smoked salmon with soft, silken scrambled eggs and a dab of
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In cigarette tax fight, Jindal's ideology trumps good sense: James Gill - NOLA.com
Google News - over 5 years
By James Gill Not since Earl Long commenced cavorting with a stripper has a Louisiana governor acted this strangely. DAVID GRUNFELD / THE TIMES-PICAYUNE Gov. Bobby Jindal speaks at the St. Tammany Parish Courthouse in Covington announcing that bath
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Area residents claim lottery prizes - New Philadelphia Times Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Mitchell Hathaway of North Canton, Betty Litman of Bolivar, Dawn Johnson of Canton, Earl Long of Alliance, Cheryl Lusby of North Canton and Jeffery Grove of Baltic each claimed a $10000 prize. Each took home $6900 after taxes
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The Blunt Knife: Telling it like it is, James Carville sees his 60 Tulane ... - The Hullabaloo Online
Google News - over 5 years
That man is Earl Long, the '40s and '50s Louisiana governor famous for always getting what he wanted in the strangest of ways — when his wife committed him into a mental hospital during an important vote on desegregation, he fired the Secretary of
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Women's Lib The Big Loser in King-Riggs Match, Says...a Guy - Village Voice (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The first -- when Earl Long was approached by blacks demanding jobs in Louisiana hospitals, he told them he would secure the jobs but that they would not like how he went about it. Long then made a series of pseudo-racist speeches, pointing out that
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Earl Long
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1960
    Age 64
    No Republican filed for the seat, and Long was unopposed in the general election set for November 8, 1960, when Long's choice for president, John F. Kennedy, would defeat Richard M. Nixon.
    More Details Hide Details Soon he suffered a fatal heart attack while in the Baptist Hospital (later Rapides General Hospital) in Alexandria. The 8th district seat had once been held by Earl Long's late brother, George Long, who had been succeeded by McSween. After Earl Long's death, the Democratic State Central Committee gave the nomination to McSween. McSween was thus unopposed in the 1960 general election for a second consecutive term in the U.S. House. McSween was defeated in the 1962 primary by his fellow liberal Democrat, Gillis William Long, who claimed to be the rightful heir to the Long dynasty. His funeral in Baton Rouge attracted numerous attendees. Long was interred at the Earl K. Long Memorial Park in Winnfield. His nephew, US Senator Russell Long, was among the pallbearers. Morgan D. Peoples and Michael L. Kurtz, in Earl K. Long: The Saga of Uncle Earl and Louisiana Politics, noted that the only thing certain about Long was his "unpredictability, for no one, and probably not even Long himself, knew what he would say or do next. Yet, whatever he did or said, Long acted from political motives—he was a political animal through and through. 'While the rest of 'em are sleeping,' he once told his rivals, 'I'm politicking.'"
    Only a few months after his term as governor expired in 1960, Earl Long ran for the United States House of Representatives from Louisiana's 8th congressional district, since redistricted.
    More Details Hide Details An entourage of Long backers from over the years flocked to support him in the race, including Bill Dodd, former Senate floor leader C. H. "Sammy" Downs, state Senator Sixty Rayburn, the Long attorney Joseph A. Sims, and A. A. Fredericks, Long's former executive assistant. Because of a third candidate, former State Representative Ben F. Holt of Rapides Parish, Long finished in second place in the primary election and was compelled into a runoff contest for the Democratic nomination with the short-term incumbent, Alexandria attorney Harold B. McSween.
    In point of fact, his victory in the congressional primary 1960 within nine months of the second gubernatorial primary was indicative of the shrewdness of his calculation.
    More Details Hide Details If Earl Long had not died immediately following that congressional race.few observers doubted that he would have been an odds-on favorite to rebuild his machine sufficiently to capture the governorship in 1964. As it happens, the death of Earl Long leaves a tremendous hiatus—in a sense deliberately created by Earl himself—in the leadership of the Long faction."
    William C. Havard, Rudolf Heberle, and Perry H. Howard, in The Louisiana Election of 1960 described Long in the following way:
    More Details Hide Details "Long knew that a term of office on the part of a relatively inactive and conservative administration would create the type of situation for which his populist appeals were ideally suited. Furthermore, he had always played down the race issue (after all, there were then 150,000 Negro voters in the state), and he certainly clearly foresaw that the issue could furnish only a limited amount of mileage for political travel in the face of current national developments.
    That year, Earl Long ran unsuccessfully for lieutenant governor, hoping to take office in 1960, but lost to Taddy Aycock.
    More Details Hide Details Dodd noted with humor that Long had become irritated with McCrory after inviting him on Long's intraparty ticket in 1956 in order: to harass and, we hoped, defeat Uncle Earl's old political enemy, Dave Pearce. All McCrory could talk about was pesticides and how to get rid of different kinds of crop-killing bugs. His main topic and claim to fame, which dominated all of his speeches, whether he was in cotton country, forestry areas, or the city of New Orleans, was his eradicating the pink boll worms from Louisiana cotton fields. Uncle Earl almost went crazy when he had to listen to... McCrory killed enough pink boll worms to fill the Atlantic Ocean. In his memoir, Dodd assesses Long, accordingly: He had no formal speech training, but he was a great, forceful, and effective speaker. He had no university background in psychology, yet he practiced psychology in his political life, which was his whole life. He had no training in either economics or governmental administration, yet as governor he was an expert in both. Somewhere along the line, Earl Long changed from an amateurish shoe-polish salesman and political camp follower into a sound businessman and excellent government administrator. Other governors drew from their formal educational training and varied business and political experiences to operate the governor's office. But none of them surpassed old Earl in the politics of getting elected or handling the job after being elected.
    He never proceeded with this. Instead, the term-limited Long unsuccessfully sought the lieutenant governorship on a ticket headed by fellow Democrat and wealthy former Governor James A. Noe Instead, Jimmie Davis was elected to a second non-consecutive term as governor in 1960, having first served from 1944 to 1948.
    More Details Hide Details It was said that in 1948 Long followed Davis and in 1960 Davis followed Long. Such figures were testaments to the persistence and power of the Long brand of populism in southern politics.
    Long supported another ally, Douglas Fowler of Coushatta, who won the position when it was established as an elective office in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details On three occasions, Long tapped Lorris M. Wimberly of Bienville Parish as Speaker of the Louisiana House of Representatives. In Louisiana, the powerful governor (although limited by a two-year term) chooses the House Speaker despite the separation of powers. In his last term, Long named Wimberly as director of public works.
  • 1959
    Age 63
    Under this scenario, Long planned to run again for governor in the December 1959 Democratic primary but by leaving office early could avoid Louisiana's ban (at the time) on governors' succeeding themselves.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1959, Long considered resigning as governor.
    More Details Hide Details His loyal lieutenant governor, Lether Edward Frazar of Lake Charles, would have succeeded him as the Louisiana chief executive for some seven months.
    Long's erratic political behavior led the aspiring singer Jay Chevalier to compose in 1959 the song, "The Ballad of Earl K. Long".
    More Details Hide Details In the 1948 Democratic primary, W.E. Anderson of Tangipahoa Parish defeated Dave L. Pearce, a legislator from West Carroll Parish in northeastern Louisiana, for the position of Louisiana Commissioner of Agriculture and Forestry. For the 1952 primary, the Democratic Party renominated Anderson without opposition to a second term. After Anderson died that year, outgoing Governor Long appointed Pearce to finish the term. Pearce won a special election and also served as commissioner during the administration of the anti-Long Governor Robert F. Kennon of Minden. Long's first lieutenant governor, William J. "Bill" Dodd, in his memoir entitled Peapatch Politics: The Earl Long Era in Louisiana Politics (named for Earl Long's "Peapatch Farm" in Winn Parish), writes that Earl Long developed a "hatred" for Pearce. The governor encouraged state entomologist Sidney McCrory of Ascension Parish to run against Pearce in the 1956 primary election. Dodd did not explain why the relationship between Long and Pearce had declined.
    George Bowdon, Jr. In the 1959 primary, Long also lost a race to Sheridan Garrett, 2,563 to 2,068, for a Winn Parish seat on the Louisiana Democratic State Central Committee.
    More Details Hide Details The colorful "Uncle Earl" (so-named because of his relatives, including nephew and U.S. Senator Russell Long) once joked that one day the people of Louisiana would elect "good government, and they won't like it!" But, beneath his public persona as a simple, plain-spoken rural Louisianan of little education, he had an astute political mind of considerable intelligence. Earl Long was a master campaigner, who attracted large crowds when his caravan crisscrossed the state. He would not allow a local person to introduce him or his ticket mates at a rally. Only out-of-parish people could do the honor. Long reasoned that nearly any local person would have made some political enemies who might reject Earl Long just because that person's "enemy" was pro-Long. Long was determined to get every vote possible and so tried to remain independent of local rivalries.
    Long was defeated for lieutenant governor in the 1959 primary by the conservative C. C. "Taddy" Aycock of Franklin in St. Mary Parish in south Louisiana, who thereafter won the January 1960 runoff election over Alexandria Mayor W.
    More Details Hide Details
    In his last gubernatorial term from 1959 to 1960, Long relied heavily on his legislative floor leader, state Representative Willard L. Rambo of Georgetown in Grant Parish, in getting bills through the legislature.
    More Details Hide Details Rambo was a Long "by marriage," having wed the former Mary Alice Long.
    Long re-appointed A.A. Fredericks as his executive secretary from 1959 through 1960, his last two years of his last term as governor.
    More Details Hide Details He appointed another confidante, former legislator Drayton Boucher of Springhill and later Baton Rouge, as interim "Custodian of voting machines" from 1958 to 1959, as he took the responsibility from the Secretary of State.
    Long eased the governmental indignities placed on African Americans and allowed a considerable number to vote. He convinced the legislature to equalize teacher pay between the races. In 1959, in response to legislative attempts to restrict the suffrage, he called for full participation by blacks in Louisiana elections.
    More Details Hide Details He knew that he would attract most of the black vote. In the 1950s, he quarreled with the state's leading segregationist, then state Senator William M. Rainach of Claiborne Parish in north Louisiana.
    After Boucher decided not to run for office in the 1959–1960 election cycle, Long appointed Douglas Fowler of Red River Parish.
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  • 1957
    Age 61
    Long blamed his failure to become lieutenant governor on Secretary of State Wade O. Martin, Jr., a former ally with whom he quarreled for many years thereafter. Years later he paid him back; in 1957, Long pushed through a new law, taking jurisdiction of insurance and voting machines out of the secretary of state's office and setting up two new patronage positions.
    More Details Hide Details Long appointed Rufus D. Hayes of Baton Rouge as the first insurance commissioner, and Drayton Boucher of Webster Parish as the commissioner of voting machines.
  • 1956
    Age 60
    In 1956, Long vetoed funding for the work undertaken by the LSU historian Edwin Adams Davis to establish the state archives.
    More Details Hide Details Davis appealed to the State Board of Liquidation for temporary relief until funding could be restored in the next legislative session. The archives became a permanent institution in Baton Rouge.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1955
    Age 59
    Long surfaced at the top of the state again in 1955–1956, when he scored an easy victory for governor over a field that included Mayor of New Orleans deLesseps Story "Chep" Morrison, Sr., a law partner of Hale Boggs; state highway director Fred Preaus of Farmerville, the choice of outgoing Governor Robert Kennon; former state police superintendent Francis Grevemberg; and businessman James M. McLemore of Alexandria.
    More Details Hide Details As Louisiana governors rarely won in the first primary, Long's first response on his victory was, "Huey never done that, did he?" In his second race for the office, McLemore ran on a primarily racial segregationist platform, following the ruling by the US Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education (1954) that segregated public schools were unconstitutional.
  • 1952
    Age 56
    Long was reluctant to appoint a successor as governor in 1952 and 1960, for he hoped to return to office in 1956, which he did, and in 1964, but he died in 1960.
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  • 1951
    Age 55
    He had a severe heart attack in 1951.
    More Details Hide Details Additionally, in his later years he was alleged to have suffered from strokes, resulting in further mental impairment. Some have speculated that he may have suffered from dementia in his last days. While confined in the mental hospital in Mandeville, Long kept his political machine running via telephone. His staff discovered that nothing in Louisiana law required him to relinquish power because he was confined to the mental hospital. Long ordered Jesse Bankston, the head of the state hospital system, fired and replaced him with a supporter, who had Long released. Bill Dodd, who had periods of positive association with Long followed by alienation, defended Long over the mental hospital confinement. So too did long-time State Senator Sixty Rayburn of Bogalusa, a personal and philosophical ally of Long's. Earl and Blanche separated at that time. He died before their divorce was completed.
    According to Garry Boulard's book, The Big Lie (2001), Long proved instrumental during the 1951–1952 campaign in charges of communism made against gubernatorial candidate Hale Boggs of New Orleans.
    More Details Hide Details Rival candidate Lucille May Grace attacked him publicly, but Boulard believes this was rigged by St. Bernard Parish boss Leander Perez. At a stormy session of the state Democratic committee, Long attacked Perez and Grace for attacking Boggs, but prevented Boggs from publicly defending himself. Some analysts thought this strategy greatly contributed to Boggs' defeat in the primary. Judge Robert F. Kennon of Minden won as governor, although most loyal Longites had lined up with Judge Carlos Spaht of Baton Rouge.
    Term limited and unable to run in the 1951–1952 elections, Long essentially sat out the statewide elections.
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  • 1950
    Age 54
    In 1950, Long struck a deal with his intraparty rival, Mayor deLesseps Story Morrison, to return home rule to the Crescent City, which at the time was being virtually governed out of Baton Rouge.
    More Details Hide Details Morrison agreed not to work against Long's nephew Russell B. Long for a full term in the United States Senate but would formally endorse one of Long's rivals, Malcolm Lafargue, the former U. S. attorney for the Western District of Louisiana, based in Shreveport. Though Morrison endorsed Lafargue, he privately urged his followers to support Russell Long, whom he fully expected to win the race anyway.
    Long suffered a major heart attack in 1950, but recovered.
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  • 1948
    Age 52
    The Memphis Commercial Appeal criticized Long's election as governor in 1948.
    More Details Hide Details Long "promised everything but the moon" - old-age pensions, veterans bonuses, a new highway system: "Apparently the voters took him at his word, for they elected him by the largest majority ever given a Louisiana candidate a gubernatorial runoff contest. That may be something in the nature of poetic justice, for the majority of voters will be getting exactly what was promised them, and for which they asked, whether they knew it or not." During the second half of his four-year term, Governor Long became close to Margaret Dixon, the first woman managing editor of the Baton Rouge Morning Advocate. She often advised him on political strategy. In 1951 he appointed her to the LSU Board of Supervisors.
    In 1948, Long was elected governor to succeed Jimmie Davis.
    More Details Hide Details At the time the salary was $12,000 annually. Long defeated his old rival Sam Jones by a wide margin. Eliminated in the first primary was U.S. Representative James Hobson "Jimmy" Morrison of Hammond, who made his third and final gubernatorial bid. Long appointed A.A. Fredericks as his executive secretary. Harvey Locke Carey of Shreveport was the campaign manager for northwest Louisiana and later the short-term U. S. Attorney for the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana.
  • FORTIES
  • 1944
    Age 48
    In 1944, Long did not run for governor but his earlier position as lieutenant governor on an intraparty ticket with former U.S. Representative Lewis Lovering Morgan of Covington in St. Tammany Parish, north of New Orleans.
    More Details Hide Details Long led the party balloting for the second position in state government, but he lost the runoff to J. Emile Verret of New Iberia, the choice of incoming Governor Jimmie Davis. His previous elected position was as a member and president of the Iberia Parish School Board. Had Morgan not entered the second primary against Jimmie Davis, Long would have become lieutenant governor without a runoff. At the time, Louisiana law provided that there would be no statewide constitutional runoff elections unless there was also a second contest for governor. That rule did not apply to state legislative races, however. In the same campaign, the Long-endorsed candidate for attorney general, state Senator Joe T. Cawthorn of Mansfield, lost to the Davis-backed Fred S. LeBlanc.
  • 1940
    Age 44
    He failed to win a term of his own in the election of 1940.
    More Details Hide Details During his abbreviated term, Long appointed a cousin, Floyd Harrison Long, Sr., as the custodian of the Central State (Mental) Hospital in Pineville. Earl Long's brief first tenure corresponded with the "Louisiana Hayride" scandals that engulfed the president of Louisiana State University, James Monroe Smith. Long was defeated in the Democratic primary by the conservative attorney Sam H. Jones of Lake Charles. After the abbreviated governorship, Long was indicted in New Orleans on charges of embezzlement and extortion. The charges involved placing a "deadhead" (an unneeded state worker who performs few or no duties) on the payroll of a special state board.
  • 1939
    Age 43
    When Governor Richard W. Leche resigned in 1939, Long succeeded for eleven months to the governorship.
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  • 1936
    Age 40
    Long handily defeated fellow Democrat Clement Murphy Moss (1902-1970), much later a judge in Lake Charles, in the primary for lieutenant governor in January 1936.
    More Details Hide Details
    He was also elected as lieutenant governor, serving from 1936 to 1939.
    More Details Hide Details Trying to keep a close hand in state government, Long failed in three other bids to be elected lieutenant governor. At the time of his death, Long's last term as governor had expired. He was the Democratic nominee for the US House of Representatives from the now defunct Eighth Congressional District, based in central Louisiana. This was redistricted after population changed. Long was born in Winnfield, the seat of Winn Parish, in north central Louisiana to Huey Pierce Long, Sr. (1852–1937) and the former Caledonia Palestine Tyson (1860–1913), a native of neighboring Grant Parish. He was the younger brother of U.S. Representative George Shannon "Doc" Long and Governor and U.S. Senator Huey Pierce Long, Jr. Their younger sister was Lucille (1898–1985), who married John S. Hunt II of Ruston, the seat of Lincoln Parish, in north Louisiana. Their son John S. Hunt, III was Louisiana Public Service Commissioner from Monroe.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1895
    Born
    Born on August 26, 1895.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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