Eddie Cantor
Actor, singer, dancer and comedian
Eddie Cantor
Eddie Cantor was an American "illustrated song" performer, comedian, dancer, singer, actor and songwriter. Familiar to Broadway, radio, movie and early television audiences, this "Apostle of Pep" was regarded almost as a family member by millions because his top-rated radio shows revealed intimate stories and amusing anecdotes about his wife Ida and five daughters.
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Eddie Cantor's personal information overview.
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Today in Music History - Aug. 26 - mysask.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Among the greats who have performed there were Fred Astaire, Eddie Cantor and Al Jolson. The theatre was restored to its original glory in 1963 after being purchased by Toronto businessman Ed Mirvish. It was designated a National Historical Site in
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Paramount’s Last Picture Show - Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Google News - over 5 years
Gracing its ornate stage during its reign as the mecca of Brooklyn entertainment were such celebrities as Frank Sinatra, Liberace, Rudy Vallee, Ginger Rogers, Bing Crosby, Eddie Cantor, George Jessel, Mae West and most of the big band era orchestras
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TV Q&A: Sasha Alexander bounces from one hit to another - Sun-Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
QI am interested in the identity of the person who sings like Eddie Cantor in some of the cabaret scenes in HBO's "Boardwalk Empire." He does a remarkable job. The credits go by so fast that I can't spot any name. Some of today's audience may not
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Vintage film comedies spotlighted in three-day festival - NewHampshire.com
Google News - over 5 years
Highlights include a scarce Eddie Cantor feature comedy called “Special Delivery” (1927) and “Two Arabian Knights” (1927) starring William Boyd and Louis Wolheim, a box office hit that won the Oscar for best comedy at the first-ever Academy Awards
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The Dividing Line - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Making allowances, I do not really expect my younger friends to remember Jack Benny, Fred Allen, Fibber McGee and Molly, and Eddie Cantor would be a stretch. But I have now discovered that even Frank Sinatra is fast becoming a "never heard of" among
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Bill Jacobson, Comedy Writer From TV's Golden Era, Dies at 91 - Hollywood Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Bill Jacobson, a comedy writer who worked for such performers as Ed Wynn, Eddie Cantor, Pat Boone, Patti Page, Red Buttons, Maurice Chevalier, Victor Borge and Arthur Godfrey, died July 19 in Encinitas, Calif., after a long illness. He was 91
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Opinion: Debt ceiling standoff revealed politics at its most raw, ideology at ... - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com
Google News - over 5 years
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor behaved more like Eddie Cantor, starring in a 10-cent-a-seat vaudeville show and wowing his crowd of admirers by throwing rhetorical cream pies in the president's face. The Tea Party contingent seemed bent on shutting
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South Shore Syncopators Sizzle As They Recreate the Spirit of the Jazz Age - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
The full audience delighted in two hours of the singular songs of Bing Crosby, Helen (Boop-a-Doop) Kane, Eddie Cantor, Annette Hatshaw, Maurice Chevalier, The Boswell Sisters, Ruby Keeler, Al Jolson and other greats and lesser known talents performed
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What's on Today
NYTimes - over 5 years
9 P.M. (CMT) SWEET HOME ALABAMA In a country spin on ''The Bachelorette,'' 20 men from across the nation converge on Fairhope, Ala., with one goal: to woo Devin Grissom (above, with her suitors), a student at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa who hopes to pursue a career in public relations for a professional sports team and find a true love
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The Maxims of Wall Street: A Crash Course in Financial Freedom - Investment U
Google News - over 5 years
Eddie Cantor “If past history was all there was to the investment game, the richest people would be librarians.” Warren Buffett “Investment success accrues not so much to the brilliant as to the disciplined.” William J. Bernstein Dr. Skousen provides
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Composer's 'Iron' fist on 'rip-off' tune - New York Post
Google News - over 5 years
His father, Harry, was a concertmaster for everyone from Frank Sinatra and composer Richard Rodgers to legendary funnyman Eddie Cantor, and watching Cantor got Urbont hooked on an entertainment career. A Sunnyside, Queens, native who moved to Manhattan
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Sketching summers of the past - Schenectady Gazette (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
John Philip Sousa played Sacandaga Park as did Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor and WC Fields. Baseball teams from Johnstown, Amsterdam and Gloversville drew big crowds on Sundays. The Adirondack Inn at the park could house 250 guests
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July: Turner Classic Movies looks at Arabs in film - Arizona Republic
Google News - over 5 years
Or pie-eyed comic Eddie Cantor in a giant turban and balloon pants dreaming of a sultan who boils people in oil in the 1937 comedy "Ali Baba Goes to Town." Arabs have been comic relief, they have been shifty-eyed villains, seducers in tents in the
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Wichita's Orpheum going strong - Emporia Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
This theater has been in operation since 1922, and on the famous “Orpheum Circuit” in its heyday, headlining such national stars as Eddie Cantor and Fannie Brice. This summer, there are several music events at the Orpheum that are worth the drive
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What's Happening at the Library in July? - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Hear the unforgettable songs of Bing Crosby, Helen (Boop-a-Doop) Kane, Eddie Cantor, Annette Hanshaw, Maurice Chevalier, the Boswell Sisters, Ruby Keeler, and Al Jolson, performed by a ten-piece ensemble with six vocalists and an announcer
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Artistic Director/Executive Producer of Hofstra Ent. Dons His Performer's Hat - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
"Imagine my delight," said Spiotto, "when I saw one of my favorite performers, Eddie Cantor, introducing a young Joel Grey as 'the Danny Kaye of tomorrow'. I kind of knew it was meant to be." "The entire experience was a great one for all concerned...a
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Remembering A 'Babe' Sports Fans Shouldn't Forget - NPR
Google News - over 5 years
It seemed that everyone in Chicago was hoarding their nickels and dimes for the city's new movie houses or staying home to listen to Eddie Cantor and Bing Crosby on the radio. George P. Emerson, a Chicago advertising man with an eye for a good stunt,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Eddie Cantor
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1964
    Age 72
    Died on October 10, 1964.
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  • 1962
    Age 70
    Ida died in August 1962 of "cardiac insufficiency", and Eddie died on October 10, 1964, in Beverly Hills, California, after suffering his second heart attack at age 72.
    More Details Hide Details He is interred in Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, California. By his early teens, Cantor began winning talent contests at local theaters and started appearing on stage. One of his earliest paying jobs was doubling as a waiter and performer, singing for tips at Carey Walsh's Coney Island saloon, where a young Jimmy Durante accompanied him on piano.
  • 1960
    Age 68
    He continued to appear as a guest on several shows, and was last seen on the NBC color broadcast of The Future Lies Ahead on January 22, 1960, which also featured Mort Sahl.
    More Details Hide Details Eddie Cantor has been portrayed as a recurring character on HBO's series Boardwalk Empire, beginning with the introduction of the show in 2010, where he is played by Stephen DeRosa. Cantor's character appeared in three episodes of the show's first season, one episode of the second season, two of the third. and one of the fourth season. Cantor appears in caricature form in numerous Looney Tunes cartoons produced for Warner Bros., although he was often voiced by an imitator. Beginning with "I Like Mountain Music" (1933), other animated Cantor cameos include "Shuffle Off to Buffalo" (Harman-Ising, 1933) and "Billboard Frolics" (Friz Freleng, 1935). Eddie Cantor is one of the four "down on their luck" stars (along with Bing Crosby, Al Jolson, and Jack Benny) snubbed by Elmer Fudd in "What’s Up, Doc? " (Bob McKimson, 1950). In "Farm Frolics" (Bob Clampett, 1941), a horse, asked by the narrator to "do a canter", promptly launches into a singing, dancing, eye-rolling impression. The Cantor gag that got the most mileage, however, was his oft-repeated wish for a son after five famous daughters. "Slap-Happy Pappy" (Clampett, 1940) features an “Eddie Cackler” rooster that wants a boy, to little avail. Other references can be found in "Baby Bottleneck" (Clampett, 1946) and "Circus Today" (Tex Avery, 1940). In Merrie Melodies, "The Coo-Coo Nut Grove" Cantor's many daughters are referenced by a group of singing quintuplet girls.
  • 1955
    Age 63
    In 1955, he appeared in a filmed series for syndication and a year later, appeared in two dramatic roles ("George Has A Birthday", on NBC's Matinee Theatre broadcast in color, and "Sizeman and Son" on CBS' Playhouse 90).
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  • 1953
    Age 61
    In 1953, Warner Bros., in an attempt to duplicate the box-office success of The Jolson Story, filmed a big-budget Technicolor feature film, The Eddie Cantor Story.
    More Details Hide Details The film found an audience, but might have done better with someone else in the leading role. Actor Keefe Brasselle played Cantor as a caricature with high-pressure dialogue and bulging eyes wide open; the fact that Brasselle was considerably taller than Cantor did not lend realism, either. Eddie and Ida Cantor were seen in a brief prologue and epilogue set in a projection room, where they are watching Brasselle in action; at the end of the film, Eddie tells Ida, "I never looked better in my life"... and gives the audience a knowing, incredulous look. George Burns, in his memoir All My Best Friends, claimed that Warner Bros. created a miracle producing the movie in that "it made Eddie Cantor's life boring". Something closer to the real Eddie Cantor story is his self-produced 1944 feature Show Business, a valentine to vaudeville and show folks, which was RKO's top-grossing film that year. Probably the best summary of Cantor's career is in one of the Colgate Comedy Hour shows. The Colgate hour was a virtual video autobiography, with Cantor recounting his career, singing his familiar hits, and recreating his singing-waiter days with his old pal Jimmy Durante. This show has been issued on DVD as Eddie Cantor in Person.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1952
    Age 60
    Cantor suffered a heart attack following a September 1952 Colgate broadcast, and thereafter, curtailed his appearances until his final program in 1954.
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  • 1949
    Age 57
    He also served as emcee of The $64 Question during 1949–50, and hosted a weekly disc jockey program for Philip Morris during the 1952–53 season.
    More Details Hide Details In addition to film and radio, Cantor recorded for Hit of the Week Records, then again for Columbia, for Banner and Decca and various small labels. His heavy political involvement began early in his career, including his participation in the strike to form Actors Equity in 1919, provoking the anger of father figure and producer, Florenz Ziegfeld. At the 1939 New York World's Fair, Cantor publicly denounced antisemitic radio personality Father Charles Coughlin and was dropped by his sponsor, Camel cigarettes. A year and a half later, his friend Jack Benny was able to get him back on the air. Cantor began making phonograph records in 1917, recording both comedy songs and routines and popular songs of the day, first for Victor, then for Aeoleon-Vocalion, Pathé, and Emerson. From 1921 through 1925, he had an exclusive contract with Columbia Records, returning to Victor for the remainder of the decade.
  • FORTIES
  • 1940
    Age 48
    His NBC radio show, Time to Smile, was broadcast from 1940 to 1946, followed by his Pabst Blue Ribbon Show from 1946 through 1949.
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  • 1938
    Age 46
    He began the first campaign on his radio show in January 1938, asking listeners to mail a dime to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
    More Details Hide Details At that time, Roosevelt was the most notable American victim of polio. Other entertainers joined in the appeal via their own shows, and the White House mail room was deluged with 2,680,000 dimes—a large sum at the time. Following the death of their daughter Marjorie at the age of 44, both Eddie and Ida's health declined rapidly.
  • 1934
    Age 42
    Indicative of his effect on the mass audience, he agreed in November 1934 to introduce a new song by the songwriters J.
    More Details Hide Details Fred Coots and Haven Gillespie that other well-known artists had rejected as being "silly" and "childish". The song, "Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town", immediately had orders for 100,000 copies of sheet music the next day. It sold 400,000 copies by Christmas of that year.
  • 1933
    Age 41
    Cantor was the second president of the Screen Actors Guild, serving from 1933 to 1935.
    More Details Hide Details He invented the title "The March of Dimes" for the donation campaigns of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which was organized to combat polio. It was a play on the The March of Time newsreels popular at the time.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1931
    Age 39
    Replacing Maurice Chevalier, who was returning to Paris, Cantor joined Chase and Sanborn on September 13, 1931.
    More Details Hide Details This hour-long Sunday evening variety series teamed Cantor with announcer Jimmy Wallington and violinist Dave Rubinoff. The show established Cantor as a leading comedian, and his scriptwriter, David Freedman, as “the Captain of Comedy.” Freedman's team included, among others, Samuel "Doc" Kurtzman, who also wrote for song-and-dance man, Al Jolson, and the comedian Jack Benny. Cantor soon became the world's highest-paid radio star. His shows began with a crowd chanting "We want Can-tor! We want Can-tor!", a phrase said to have originated in vaudeville, when the audience chanted to chase off an act on the bill before Cantor. Cantor's theme song was his own lyric to the Leo Robin/Richard Whiting song, "One Hour with You". His radio sidekicks included Bert Gordon, (comic Barney Gorodetsky, aka "The Mad Russian") and Harry Parke (better known as "Parkyakarkus"). Cantor also discovered and helped guide the career of singer Dinah Shore, first featuring her on his radio show in 1940, as well as other performers, including Deanna Durbin, Bobby Breen in 1936 and Eddie Fisher in 1949.
    Cantor's appearance with Rudy Vallee on Vallee's The Fleischmann's Yeast Hour on February 5, 1931 led to a four-week tryout with NBC's The Chase and Sanborn Hour.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1922
    Age 30
    Cantor appeared on radio as early as February 3, 1922, as indicated by this news item from Connecticut's Bridgeport Telegram:
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  • 1917
    Age 25
    A year later, Cantor made his Broadway debut in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1917.
    More Details Hide Details He continued in the Follies until 1927, a period considered the best years of the long-running revue. For several years, Cantor co-starred in an act with pioneer comedian Bert Williams, both appearing in blackface; Cantor played Williams's fresh-talking son. Other co-stars with Cantor during his time in the Follies included Will Rogers, Marilyn Miller, Fanny Brice, and W.C. Fields. He moved on to stardom in book musicals, starting with Kid Boots (1923) and Whoopee! (1928). On tour with Banjo Eyes, he romanced the unknown Jacqueline Susann, who had a small part in the show, and went on to become the best-selling author of Valley of the Dolls.
    Esther died on January 29, 1917, two days before Cantor signed a long-term contract with Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., to appear in his Follies.
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  • 1914
    Age 22
    Cantor and Ida were married in 1914.
    More Details Hide Details They had five daughters, Marjorie, Natalie, Edna, Marilyn, and Janet, who provided comic fodder for Cantor's longtime running gag, especially on radio, about his five unmarriageable daughters. Several radio historians, including Gerald Nachman (Raised on Radio), have said that this gag did not always sit well with the girls.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1912
    Age 20
    In 1912, he was the only performer over the age of 20 to appear in Gus Edwards's Kid Kabaret, where he created his first blackface character, "Jefferson".
    More Details Hide Details He later toured with Al Lee as the team "Cantor and Lee". Critical praise from that show got the attention of Broadway's top producer, Florenz Ziegfeld, who gave Cantor a spot in the Ziegfeld rooftop post-show, Midnight Frolic (1917).
  • 1907
    Age 15
    He made his first public appearance in Vaudeville in 1907 at New York's Clinton Music Hall.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1892
    Age 0
    Born in 1892.
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