Eddie Slovik
United States Army soldier
Eddie Slovik
Edward Donald Slovik was a private in the United States Army during World War II and the only American soldier to be court-martialled and executed for desertion since the American Civil War. Although over 21,000 American soldiers were given varying sentences for desertion during World War II, including 49 death sentences, Slovik's was the only death sentence carried out.
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News
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Chat logs show Bradley Manning's early activism - CNET
Google News - over 5 years
Then there was Eddie Slovik, who wasn't cut out for the army life of World War 2. by RedSubmarine (146 comments ) July 7, 2011 3:58 AM PDT @lkrupp: Sieg heil, mein Freund. Kill, kill, kill them all. Shoot, hang, electocute. Oh, and wipe the foam from
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Google News article
Texas Reads: Earl Rudder was war hero, decisive A&M leader - Abilene Reporter-News
Google News - over 5 years
Ten of the book's 17 chapters focus on Rudder during the war, including the Battle of the Bulge and the execution of Private Eddie Slovik, but by far the longest chapter deals with D-Day at Normandy. The book opens with Rudder growing up in the West
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Google News article
Stravinsky's Devil, Reignited
NYTimes - over 5 years
THE setting, dialogue and dance steps of Igor Stravinsky's ''Histoire du Soldat,'' a music-theater piece from 1918, are as malleable as the Faust story on which the work is based. What doesn't change is the music: a tart panoply of jazzy figures, dance forms and marches. Its sound is unmistakable, given Stravinsky's unusual -- yet so logical --
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NYTimes article
Stravinsky's Devil, Reignited - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Kurt Vonnegut wrote a new text, basing the story loosely on that of Pvt. Eddie Slovik, who was executed for desertion in 1945. Ms. Oberfelder has taken the piece a long distance from Stravinsky's simple conception. A former writer of lyrics for her
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Google News article
Farewell to St. Therese Church - Wilkes Barre Times-Leader
Google News - almost 6 years
Father Cummings became famously known for giving spiritual guidance to the only American soldier, Eddie Slovik, to be executed as a deserter in World War II, and about whom a movie was created. Today, as the parish groundskeeper, I often speak with
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Google News article
Free Soldier's Tale Performance at Antioch - Yellow Springs News
Google News - almost 6 years
The virtuosic score that Stravinsky composed for The Soldier's Tale in 1918 has been re-conceptualized many times. In 1993, novelist Kurt Vonnegut revamped the story to explore the life of Eddie Slovik, the only American soldier executed for desertion
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Google News article
Lamont Johnson, 88, Prolific TV Director
NYTimes - over 6 years
Lamont Johnson, an Emmy-winning television director known for bringing an understated touch to delicate subjects, died on Sunday at his home in Monterey, Calif. He was 88. The cause was heart failure, his son, Chris, said. Mr. Johnson, the director of more than 150 television shows, miniseries and movies of the week, received 11 Emmy nominations
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NYTimes article
BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Fresh Out of the Cornfields And Into the Hell of War
NYTimes - about 12 years
'Articles of War' A Novel By Nick Arvin 178 pages. Doubleday. $17. Nick Arvin's first novel is about a quiet young Iowan, 18 years old and prematurely balding, who finds himself in hell. He would not describe it that way because he doesn't curse, to the point where he has been nicknamed Heck by the other soldiers. They have all been sent to France
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NYTimes article
MUSIC REVIEW; Setting Poems on a Battle With Leukemia
NYTimes - over 14 years
Richard Auldon Clark and his Manhattan Chamber Orchestra have made a specialty of presenting contemporary works, and because the ensemble's strings produce a comparatively lush, seductive sound, it usually fares best in fairly conservative works. The three works Mr. Clark conducted on Tuesday evening at Merkin Concert Hall had conservative
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NYTimes article
CHRONICLE
NYTimes - over 19 years
KURT VONNEGUT is trying again. Not as a novelist but as a librettist. Mr. Vonnegut's new novel, ''Timequake,'' is set for publication on Sept. 22. No problem there. In the meantime, he is having another go at the music-drama ''L'Histoire du Soldat,'' a project that has occupied him intermittently since George Plimpton introduced him four years ago
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NYTimes article
The Rest Is Silence
NYTimes - over 20 years
Francisco Lucas Rodriguez-Roman grew up in Cuba detesting Fidel Castro's Communist system. A college graduate and teacher, he went into the merchant marine with the hope that some day it would give him a way out. After a few years he had his chance, jumped ship and sought asylum in the United States. What has happened to him says important things
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NYTimes article
Review/Music; Kurt Vonnegut's Reinterpretation of 'L'Histoire du Soldat'
NYTimes - almost 24 years
The drawing card on the New York Philomusica Chamber Ensemble program on Thursday evening at Alice Tully Hall was Stravinsky's "Histoire du Soldat," with a new text composed for the occasion by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Because the text and music in a music-drama work are so closely intertwined, replacing a work's text is no small thing. In this case the
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NYTimes article
CHRONICLE
NYTimes - almost 24 years
They are improbable partners: KURT VONNEGUT and Igor Stravinsky, but their words and music will come together on Thursday at Alice Tully Hall at the premiere of a new version of "L'Histoire du Soldat" by the New York Philomusica Chamber Ensemble. The original libretto for "L'Histoire du Soldat" was by Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz, a Swiss novelist who
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NYTimes article
When Black Soldiers Were Hanged: a War's Footnote
NYTimes - about 24 years
As the role of black soldiers is documented in the history of World War II, J. Robert Lilly is trying to fathom one more distinction of that American fighting man: the fact that almost four times as many black soldiers as whites were executed in Europe after military courts-martial, even though blacks made up less than 10 percent of the troops.
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NYTimes article
FOLLOW-UP ON THE NEWS; Seeking a Pardon For Eddie Slovik
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: FORTY-TWO YEARS after Pvt. FORTY-TWO YEARS after Pvt. Eddie Slovik was executed by a firing squad for desertion in World War II, his body was returned home from France. Mr. Slovik, the only American since the Civil War to be punished by death for desertion, was reburied in a Detroit cemetery in July next to his wife, Antoinette. The person
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NYTimes article
World War II Deserter Buried in Michigan
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: Anna Kadlubowski placing a flower on the coffin containing the remains of her brother, Pvt. Eddie Slovik, yesterday. Private Slovik was executed by firing squad in 1945 for desertion and buried in France. His remains were exhumed last week and returned to Detroit where he was buried next to his wife, Antoinette. Anna Kadlubowski placing a
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NYTimes article
Pvt. Eddie Slovik's Remains Are Found in San Francisco
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: The remains of Pvt. Eddie Slovik, which were lost on their way from France and then found in San Francisco, headed home to Detroit today, more than four decades after his execution for desertion in World War II. The remains of Pvt. Eddie Slovik, which were lost on their way from France and then found in San Francisco, headed home to Detroit
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NYTimes article
Remains of Pvt. Eddie Slovik Lost in Transit From France
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: The remains of Pvt. Eddie Slovik, the only American soldier executed for desertion in World War II, were reported missing by airline officials tonight as they were being returned from France for reburial in his native Detroit. The remains of Pvt. Eddie Slovik, the only American soldier executed for desertion in World War II, were reported
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NYTimes article
ALBERT MALTZ, A SCREENWRITER BLACKLISTED BY INDUSTRY, DIES
NYTimes - almost 32 years
Albert Maltz, an Academy-Award-winning screenwriter and one of 10 Hollywood figures jailed in 1950 and blacklisted by the movie industry for refusing to answer questions of the House Committee on Un-American Activities, died Friday of complications resulting from shingles in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Mr. Maltz was 76 years old and
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Eddie Slovik
    TWENTIES
  • 1945
    Age 25
    The military service record of Slovik, which is now a public archival record available from the Military Personnel Records Center, provides a detailed account of the actual execution of Slovik which took place in 1945 and it was upon this that most of the film was based.
    More Details Hide Details Some dramatic license occurs, including during the execution. There is no evidence, for example, that the priest attending Slovik's execution shouted "Give it another volley if you like it so much" after the doctor indicated Slovik was still alive. In addition, the 1963 war film The Victors includes a scene featuring the execution of a deserter clearly inspired by Slovik. Kurt Vonnegut mentions Slovik's execution in his novel Slaughterhouse-Five. Vonnegut also wrote a companion libretto to Igor Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat, or A Soldier's Tale, which tells Slovik's story. Slovik also appears in Nick Arvin's 2005 novel Articles of War, in which the fictional protagonist, Private George (Heck) Tilson, is one of the members of Slovik's firing squad.
  • 1944
    Age 24
    Slovik was charged with desertion to avoid hazardous duty and tried by court martial on 11 November 1944.
    More Details Hide Details Slovik had to be tried by a court martial composed of staff officers from other U.S. Army divisions, because all combat officers from the 28th Infantry Division were fighting on the front lines. The prosecutor, Captain John Green, presented witnesses to whom Slovik had stated his intention to "run away". The defense counsel, Captain Edward Woods, announced that Slovik had elected not to testify. At the end of the day, the nine officers of the court found Slovik guilty and sentenced him to death. The sentence was reviewed and approved by the division commander, Major General Norman Cota. General Cota's stated attitude was "Given the situation as I knew it in November, 1944, I thought it was my duty to this country to approve that sentence. If I hadn't approved it--if I had let Slovik accomplish his purpose--I don't know how I could have gone up to the line and looked a good soldier in the face."
    Tankey wrote to their regiment to explain their absence before he and Slovik reported to their unit for duty on October 7, 1944.
    More Details Hide Details The US Army's rapid advance through France had caused many replacement soldiers to have trouble finding their assigned units, and so no charges were filed against Slovik or Tankey. The following day on October 8, Slovik informed his company commander, Captain Ralph Grotte, that he was "too scared" to serve in a front-line rifle company and asked to be reassigned to a rear area unit. He told Grotte that he would run away if he were assigned to a rifle unit, and asked his captain if that would constitute desertion. Grotte confirmed that it would. He refused Slovik's request for reassignment and sent him to a rifle platoon. The next day, October 9, Slovik deserted from his infantry unit. His friend, John Tankey, caught up with him and attempted to persuade him to stay, but Slovik's only comment was that his "mind was made up". Slovik walked several miles to the rear and approached an enlisted cook at a headquarters detachment, presenting him with a note which stated:
    Slovik arrived at Camp Wolters in Texas for basic military training on January 24, 1944.
    More Details Hide Details In August, he was dispatched to join the fighting in France. Arriving on August 20, he was one of 12 replacements assigned to Company G of the 109th Infantry Regiment, U.S. 28th Infantry Division. While en route to his assigned unit, Slovik and Private John Tankey, a friend he met during basic training, took cover during an artillery attack and became separated from their replacement detachment. This was the point at which Slovik later stated he found he "wasn't cut out for combat." The next morning, they found a Canadian military police unit and remained with them for the next six weeks.
  • 1942
    Age 22
    In April 1942, Slovik was paroled once more, and he obtained a job at Montella Plumbing and Heating in Dearborn, Michigan. There he met the woman who would become his wife, Antoinette Wisniewski, while she was working as a bookkeeper for the owner, James Montella. They married on November 7, 1942 and lived with her parents.
    More Details Hide Details Slovik's criminal record made him classified as unfit for duty in the U.S. military (4-F), but, shortly after the couple's first wedding anniversary, Slovik was reclassified as fit for duty (1-A) and subsequently drafted by the Army.
    Colonel Robert C. Bard of the judge advocate general's office noted that of the 2,864 army personnel tried for desertion for the period January 1942 through June 1948, 49 were convicted and sentenced to death, and 48 of those sentences were voided by higher authority.
    More Details Hide Details One of the members of the tribunal came to believe that Slovik's execution was an injustice in light of all the circumstances, and was an example of disparate treatment from a flawed process. In 1960, Frank Sinatra announced his plan to produce a movie titled The Execution of Private Slovik, to be written by blacklisted Hollywood 10 screenwriter Albert Maltz. This announcement provoked great outrage, and Sinatra was accused of being a Communist sympathizer. As Sinatra was campaigning for John F. Kennedy for President, the Kennedy camp became concerned, and ultimately persuaded Sinatra to cancel the project. However, Slovik's execution was the basis for a 1954 book by William Bradford Huie. In 1974, the book was adapted for a TV movie starring Martin Sheen and also called The Execution of Private Slovik.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1939
    Age 19
    After stealing and crashing a car with two friends while drunk, he was sent back to prison in January 1939.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1937
    Age 17
    In October 1937, he was sent to prison but was paroled in September 1938.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1932
    Age 12
    Between 1932 and 1937, he was caught for several incidents of petty theft, breaking and entering, and disturbing the peace.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1920
    Age 0
    Born on February 18, 1920.
    More Details Hide Details
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