Eddy Duchin
American musician
Eddy Duchin
Eddy Duchin was an American popular pianist and bandleader of the 1930s and 1940s, famous for his engaging onstage personality, his elegant piano style, and his fight against leukemia.
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News
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Klemm Lists New Preston House of Peter Duchin and Brooke Hayward Duchin - Litchfield County Times
Google News - over 5 years
WASHINGTON—Klemm Real Estate has just listed the New Preston property of the bandleader Peter Duchin, son of Eddy Duchin, and Brooke Hayward Duchin, daughter of Broadway producer Leland Hayward and actress Margaret Sullavan and author of the best
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Ralphael Platner, a Toronto legend with encyclopedic recall - Globe and Mail
Google News - over 5 years
When asked for his favourites, he quickly offers Vertigo (1958), The Left Hand of God (1955) and The Eddy Duchin Story (1956). With the 50th anniversary of his start in sales just around the corner, one might reasonably ask the tanned and ageless Mr
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Qué english semos - Faro de Vigo
Google News - over 5 years
Pero, conscientes los distribuidores de que nadie pondría los pies en un cine para ver cosas llamadas "HM Pulham, Esq.", "Harriet Craig", "The Molly Maguires", "The Eddy Duchin Story" o "The Helen Morgan Story", las renombraron respectivamente nada
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The Haunted Heaven: Chapter Three: The War Crime - Enter Stage Right
Google News - over 5 years
Listening to Eddy Duchin's Lovely To Look At blaring out over the painfully longing strains of the Perlman Vocalize. Odd how, just now, they both ended together. But now, however, there is Errol Garner because of his incredibly musical influence on me
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South Orange is Celebrating, About Town - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
The South Orange Public Library will present a free screening of the 1956 film “The Eddy Duchin Story” on June 8 at 1 pm The movie tells the life story of the famous pianist and bandleader of the 1930s and '40s
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F**K, the movie: Documentary explores the history of the F-word - San Antonio Current
Google News - over 5 years
In music, it was Eddy Duchin who used the word in his rendition of Louis Armstrong's “Ol' Man Mose” long before the advent of hip-hop. (He says “Ahh, fuck it!” even though some maintain he said “bucket”.) JD Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye includes
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Google News article
RIP John Walker of The Walker Brothers - A.V. Club Chicago
Google News - almost 6 years
In addition to doing session work with people like Glen Campbell and Phil Spector, Walker also dabbled in acting, landing bit parts in the movies The Eddy Duchin Story and The Missouri Traveler, as well as a recurring role on the sitcom Hello Mom
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There's always room for the sound of music - NorthJersey.com
Google News - almost 6 years
And when I was in high school, I was trying to emulate Eddy Duchin in a pickup dance band. When I was a boy, incidentally, just about everyone took music lessons. My pal, Mickey, became pretty good on the violin; Stu Pike played the clarinet; Les Bell,
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DVDS; How Kim Novak Mixed Glamour With Gutsy
NYTimes - over 6 years
BY the time Marilyn Pauline Novak arrived in Hollywood in 1953, the industry's once highly efficient star-making machinery was beginning to break down. A former model whose hourglass figure had earned her a walk-on in the Jane Russell musical ''The French Line,'' Ms. Novak was recruited by Columbia Pictures to be groomed as its answer to Marilyn
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NYTimes article
LETTER; Peter Duchin: Inspiration and Admiration
NYTimes - about 7 years
To the Editor: Re ''His Music Still Makes Society Whirl'' by Eric Konigsberg [Dec. 6]: Thank you for your article on Peter Duchin. When I was 19, ''The Eddy Duchin Story'' inspired me to take piano lessons. I pestered my parents for months to buy me a piano, which they did, an old upright. Unfortunately I did not have the discipline to carry
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NYTimes article
Lions and Tigers and Debt
NYTimes - about 7 years
ON an April night in 1966, Kay O'Reilly, a dishy 22-year-old English ''air hostess'' for TWA -- her job title back in the ''Mad Men'' decade -- swept into the sprawling wonderland of Maxwell's Plum. The restaurant embodied not only the city's culinary revolution, but the sexual one as well, for it was New York's most flamboyant singles bar. So it
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NYTimes article
His Music Still Makes Society Whirl
NYTimes - about 7 years
THERE are certain people for whom a party doesn't rate if the Peter Duchin Orchestra isn't playing. Over the years Mr. Duchin, as both pianist and bandleader, has provided the musical entertainment at an estimated 6,000 celebrations. The list itself could function as a potted history of late-era American society, as it includes everything from
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NYTimes article
A Curator's Tastes Were All Too Human
NYTimes - over 11 years
This, her friends agree, is how she would want to be remembered: her own Gretchen Worden Room at the Mütter Museum, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia's collection of medical specimens and instruments. It's a small room, in a former storage area Ms. Worden jokingly referred to as ''the tumor room.'' But it has been handsomely fitted out
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NYTimes article
BOLDFACE NAMES
NYTimes - almost 15 years
Dinner Sans Dinner The invitation said ''Dinner for Five,'' but the 300 guests (think the young and the interns) at the Cutting Room bar in Chelsea (think the back room doubles as an ashtray) last week discovered there was dinner for none. ''Dinner for Five'' is the director JON FAVREAU'S new talk show for the Independent Film Channel, which begins
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NYTimes article
Milton Berle, TV's First Star As 'Uncle Miltie,' Dies at 93
NYTimes - almost 15 years
Milton Berle, the brash comedian who emerged from vaudeville, nightclubs, radio and films to become the first star of television, igniting a national craze for the new medium in the late 1940's, died yesterday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 93. The uninhibited Mr. Berle almost single-handedly led the entertainment revolution that addicted the
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Samuel Taylor, 87, Playwright Who Created 'Sabrina,' Dies
NYTimes - over 16 years
Samuel Taylor, who wrote Broadway confections like ''Sabrina Fair'' and ''The Pleasure of His Company'' and worked on the script for the Hitchcock thriller ''Vertigo,'' died on Friday at his home in Blue Hill, Me. He was 87. Favoring the genre in which Philip Barry famously tweaked the rich and evah-so-charming, as in ''The Philadelphia Story,''
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George Duning, 92, Composer for Films
NYTimes - almost 17 years
George Duning, an Oscar-nominated composer who wrote music for films and television, died on Sunday at Alavarado Hospital in Los Angeles. He was 92. Mr. Duning received Academy Award nominations for five film scores he wrote for Columbia Pictures, where he worked from 1947 to 1962: ''Jolson Sings Again'' (1949), ''No Sad Songs for Me'' (1950),
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NYTimes article
Falling in Love With the Old Songs
NYTimes - almost 18 years
AS the American popular song of the first half of the century drifts farther from commercial radio, Garret Stack's program ''Echoes of the Past'' grows more vital. ''Echoes,'' on Saturdays from 5:30 until 7 P.M. on Arts Radio WMNR 88.1 FM in Monroe, is the only weekly program in the region dedicated to American popular music from between 1920 and
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NYTimes article
PUBLIC LIVES
NYTimes - over 18 years
A Musician's Life, Now in Paperback CHARLES MICHENER was watching a violent storm blow through Litchfield County, Connecticut, yesterday afternoon and talking about his friend PETER DUCHIN, whose autobiography, ''Ghost of a Chance'' (Random House), he helped write two years ago. ''Before the book was written, he had a hard time being alone,'' said
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New & Noteworthy Paperbacks
NYTimes - over 18 years
Trail Fever: Spin Doctors, Rented Strangers, and Thumb Wrestlers on the Road to the White House By Michael Lewis. Vintage, $14. In reporting on the 1996 Presidential campaign, the author details the nearly farcical demands of politics in the television age and discovers more wisdom and bravery among those at the bottom of the political food chain
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Eddy Duchin
    OTHER
  • 1951
    On February 9, 1951, Eddy Duchin died at age 41 in New York City of acute myelogenous leukemia.
    More Details Hide Details He was cremated, and his ashes were scattered in the Atlantic Ocean. By the mid 1950s, Columbia Pictures, having enjoyed success with musical biographies, mounted a feature film based on the bandleader's life. The Eddy Duchin Story (1956) is a fictionalized tearjerker, with Tyrone Power in the title role. The film did well in theaters, and was well enough known to be referenced in one of Columbia's Three Stooges shorts: the Stooges' spaceship is about to crash when Joe Besser yelps, "I don't want to die! I can't die! I haven't seen The Eddy Duchin Story yet!" An anthology of some of Duchin's best recordings, Dancing with Duchin, was released in 2002. Duchin had one child, Peter Duchin (b. 1937), with his first wife, Marjorie Oelrichs. Peter had begun a musical education with his father and eventually later studied formally at Yale. In time, he became an orchestra-leading pianist in his own right, as well as the author of a series of mystery novels, a presence in high society (into which his mother had been born), and a frequent entertainer (as well as musical director for U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson's inauguration) at the White House and on television. In his 1996 memoir Ghost of a Chance, Peter Duchin wrote about the wholesale fictionalization in The Eddy Duchin Story. Peter Duchin for two decades was married to actress/writer Brooke Hayward (daughter of agent and theatrical producer Leland Hayward and actress Margaret Sullavan), since 1985.
  • 1949
    After his discharge from the military, Duchin was unable to reclaim his former stardom in spite of a stab at a new radio show in 1949.
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  • 1938
    Duchin's 1938 release of the Louis Armstrong song "Ol' Man Mose" (Brunswick Records 8155) with vocal by Patricia Norman caused a minor scandal at the time with the lyric "bucket" being heard as "fuck it."
    More Details Hide Details Some listeners conclude that there is no vulgarism uttered, while others are convinced that Norman does say "fuck" (which would explain one of the band members laughing delightedly after Norman seems to chirp, "Awww, fuck it... fuck-fuck-fuck it!"). The "scandalous" lyrics caused the record to zoom to #2 on the Billboard charts, resulting in sales of 170,000 copies when sales of 20,000 were considered a blockbuster. The song was banned after its release in Great Britain. The notorious number can be heard on a British novelty CD, Beat the Band to the Bar. Duchin entered the U.S. Navy during World War II, serving as a combat officer in a destroyer squadron in the Pacific. He attained the rank of lieutenant commander (O4).
  • 1932
    He first became a pharmacist before turning full-time to music and beginning his new career with Leo Reisman's orchestra at the Central Park Casino in New York, an elegant nightclub where he became hugely popular in his own right and eventually became the Reisman orchestra's leader by 1932.
    More Details Hide Details He became widely popular thanks to regular radio broadcasts that boosted his record sales, and he was one of the earliest pianists to lead a commercially successful large band. Playing what later came to be called "sweet" music rather than jazz, Duchin's success opened a new gate for similarly styled, piano-playing sweet bandleaders such as Henry King, Joe Reichman, Nat Brandwynne, Dick Gasparre, Little Jack Little, and particularly Carmen Cavallaro (who acknowledged Duchin's influence) to compete with the large jazz bands for radio time and record sales. Duchin had no formal music training—which was said to frustrate his musicians at times—but he developed a style rooted in classical music that some saw as the forerunner of Liberace's ornate, gaudy approach. Still, there were understatements in Duchin's music. By no means was Duchin a perfect pianist, but he was easy to listen to without being rote or entirely predictable. He was a pleasing stage presence whose favourite technique was to play his piano cross-handed, using only one finger on the lower hand, and he was respectful to his audiences and to his classical influences.
  • 1909
    Edwin Frank Duchin was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts to Bessarabian Jewish immigrants. Sources are divided as to whether his birth occurred on 1 April 1909 or 10 April 1910.
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