Edward Brooke
United States politician, lawyer
Edward Brooke
Edward William Brooke III is an American politician and was elected to the United States Senate as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, former Massachusetts governor, Endicott Peabody in a landslide. He served for two terms, and was defeated by Paul Tsongas in the 1978 senate election.
Biography
Edward Brooke's personal information overview.
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D. R. Tucker: Edward Brooke: The Last Statesman
The Huffington Post - about 5 years
As I read this magnificent book, I found myself regretting my youth, wishing that I had been born 40 years earlier so that I could have voted for this man in his trailblazing contests.
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The Huffington Post article
Elizabeth Warren Makes Moves Challenge Scott Brown in M.A. - Ology
Google News - over 5 years
Edward Brooke defeated John Droney in 1972. Democrats in the Bay State have viewed Brown's tenure in the “Kennedy Seat” as an aberration that would likely be corrected in the next election cycle. However, if Warren wins the nomination, that calculation
Article Link:
Google News article
Buying Here: Squirrel Hill - Pittsburgh Post Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
But it was probably the covers he did of Rudolph Peterson and Senator Edward Brooke in 1966 and 1967 that gave flight to the angels. The artist passed away in 1991 as a result of a bicycle accident while in St. Polten, Austria
Article Link:
Google News article
2011 - The Year of the Steel Pan - Pan Podium (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Charles Edward Brooke School's Pan Africa 3.The Pan Nation Steel Band-Hornsey 4.Leeds Silver Doves 5.North Tyneside Steel Band. St. Michael School Steel Orchestra directed by Fred Totesaut would be playing at the service
Article Link:
Google News article
Obama to shore up Jewish support - Politico (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The only popularly elected Republican black senators Edward Brooke served from 1967 to 1979. He was also the first African American elected to the Senate since the 19th century. US Senator Edward Brooke was born on October 26, 1919 in Washington,
Article Link:
Google News article
Barbara Walters shocks viewers with positive comments about Weiner's erection - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
To shed some light on the possible basis for Barbara Walter's viewpoint, it's important to recall that in her memoirs in 2008, Barbara revealed that she'd had an affair with African-American Senator Edward Brooke from Massachusetts, who was married at
Article Link:
Google News article
Weinergate: Barbara Walters Loses Reporter Cred – UPDATE - Patheos
Google News - over 5 years
Google Barbara Walters Edward Brooke and then explain why this woman was taken seriously as a reporter for most of her career. We have not had a genuine press for some time, but now with the Internet we can see just how awful it is
Article Link:
Google News article
Limbaugh Tackles Krauthammer; Jews Sticking With Obama - NewsMax.com
Google News - over 5 years
Moderate-to-liberal Republicans including Nelson Rockefeller in New York and Edward Brooke in Massachusetts regularly won a large share of the Jewish vote, but in today's GOP "there are almost no liberals or moderates," Abramowitz observes
Article Link:
Google News article
6 for '16: The Six Republicans Most Likely to Win in 2016 - 411mania.com
Google News - over 5 years
The first Republican elected to the Senate in the heavily-liberal state since Edward Brooke in 1972, Brown swept to power on a wave of Tea Party support. Celebrated as the vital 41st vote in the Senate, Brown has left many of his initial backers
Article Link:
Google News article
Sen. Scott Brown Draws Crowd at Tatnuck - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Napolean pointed out that while Tatnuck “draws 2 or 3 author signings a week,” the last notable political author to visit Tatnuck was another former US Senator from Massachusetts, Edward Brooke, who published a memoir, Bridging the Divide, in 2006
Article Link:
Google News article
Local municipalities may share services - Petrolia Topic
Google News - over 5 years
Councils in Petrolia, Point Edward, Brooke-Alvinston Township, Enniskillen Township and Oil Springs also indicated they are willing to look at the potential for sharing services. "By and large, it was very positive," Bradley said
Article Link:
Google News article
Joy Behar Asks If She Has to 'Spend the Night With Barney Frank' to Climb the ... - NewsBusters (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
Edward Brooke in her memoirs. Or, as it was described, "Barbara Walters, Skanky in the Seventies." Tim Graham is Director of Media Analysis at the Media Research Center. You can follow him on Twitter here
Article Link:
Google News article
Redrawing political maps takes a first step - The Boston - Bay State Banner
Google News - almost 6 years
Edward Brooke all were either elected as Republicans or appointed by GOP governors. In fact, Gov. Deval Patrick's 2006 victory marked the first time an African American was elected to an office ranked higher than the state senate on the Democratic
Article Link:
Google News article
BRISTOL: Reading the tea leaves on the tea party - Attleboro Sun Chronicle
Google News - almost 6 years
The Lowell Democrat served two terms in the House, then ran for US Senate, defeating Edward Brooke in 1978. He served one Senate term and retired in 1984 after he was found to have cancer. His seat went to John Kerry. After treatment for non-Hodgkins
Article Link:
Google News article
In Redistricting Process, Minority Groups Get Proactive - WBUR
Google News - almost 6 years
Edward Brooke, who left office more than 30 years ago. On Beacon Hill, the numbers are only slightly better. Out of the 160 members of the Massachusetts House of Representatives there are nine African Americans, two Asian Americans, and one Latino
Article Link:
Google News article
TAB EDITORIAL: Newton's only newspaper has a unique responsibility in Warren ... - Wicked Local
Google News - almost 6 years
If it hasn't been written already, it won't be long before political pundits note that Warren, if elected, would be the first black US Senator from Massachusetts since Edward Brooke, a Republican, went to Washington in 1967. Here at the Newton TAB,
Article Link:
Google News article
How to Go Green? Look to DC's Ledroit Park - The Atlantic
Google News - almost 6 years
Founded in the second half of the nineteenth century, it has been home to a number of prominent African Americans, including such luminaries as Ralph Bunche (United Nations leader), Edward Brooke (US Senator, Massachusetts), Mary Church Terrell (a
Article Link:
Google News article
'Fear of a Black Republican' Review: Fascinating Look at Important Story - Big Hollywood
Google News - almost 6 years
Former Senator Edward Brooke, the only black Republican Senator since Reconstruction, tells Williams in the film, “You get corruption in government when you don't have a vital two-party system.” That system is long gone in much of urban America
Article Link:
Google News article
Brown says redistricting plan should empower minorities - Boston Globe
Google News - almost 6 years
There has only been one nonwhite member of the congressional delegation in state history — Senator Edward Brooke, a Republican. Legal groups that represent minority voters have long claimed that the Democratic-leaning Legislature has drawn districts
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Edward Brooke
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2015
    Age 95
    On January 3, 2015, Brooke died at his home in Coral Gables, Florida, at the age of 95.
    More Details Hide Details He was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Section 8, Site 5190-5-RH.
  • 2009
    Age 89
    Two days after his 90th birthday, Brooke was presented with the Congressional Gold Medal on October 28, 2009.
    More Details Hide Details The first of Boston's Brooke Charter Schools was founded in 2002.
  • 2004
    Age 84
    On June 23, 2004, President George W. Bush awarded Brooke the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
    More Details Hide Details That same year he received the Jeremy Nicholson Negro Achievement Award, acknowledging his outstanding contributions to the African-American community.
  • 2002
    Age 82
    In September 2002, he was diagnosed with breast cancer and assumed a national role in raising awareness of the disease among men.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 2002, scholar Molefi Kete Asante listed Edward Brooke on his list of 100 Greatest African Americans.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1996
    Age 76
    In 1996, Brooke became the first chairman of the World Policy Council, a think tank of Alpha Phi Alpha, an African-American fraternity.
    More Details Hide Details The Council's purpose is to expand the fraternity's involvement in politics, and social and current policy to encompass international concerns. In 2006 Brooke served as the council's chairman emeritus and was honorary chairman at the Centennial Convention of Alpha Phi Alpha held in Washington, D.C. On June 20, 2000, a newly constructed Boston courthouse was dedicated in his honor. The Edward W. Brooke Courthouse is part of the Massachusetts Trial Court system, and houses the Central Division of the Boston Municipal Court, Boston Juvenile Court, Family Court, and Boston Housing Court, among others.
  • 1992
    Age 72
    In 1992, a Brooke assistant stated in a plea agreement as part of an investigation into corruption at the Department of Housing and Urban Development that Brooke had falsely answered questions about whether he or the assistant had tried to improperly influence HUD officials on behalf of housing and real estate developers who had paid large consulting fees to Brooke.
    More Details Hide Details The HUD investigation ended with no charges being brought against Brooke.
  • 1984
    Age 64
    In 1984 he was selected as chairman of the Boston Bank of Commerce, and one year later he was named to the board of directors of Grumman.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1978
    Age 58
    In Massachusetts, Brooke's support among Catholics weakened due to his stance on abortion. During the 1978 re-election campaign, the state's bishops spoke in opposition to his leading role.
    More Details Hide Details Brooke went through a divorce late in his second term. His finances were investigated by the Senate, and John Kerry, then a prosecutor in Middlesex County, announced an investigation into statements Brooke made in the divorce case. Prosecutors eventually determined that Brooke had made false statements about his finances during the divorce, and that they were pertinent, but not material enough to have affected the outcome. Brooke was not charged with a crime, but the negative publicity cost him some support in his reelection campaign, and he lost to Paul Tsongas. After leaving the Senate, Brooke practiced law in Washington, D.C., partner O'Connor & Hannan; of counsel, Csaplar & Bok, Boston. He also served as chairman of the board of the National Low Income Housing Coalition.
  • 1976
    Age 56
    The press again speculated on his possible candidacy for the Vice Presidency as Gerald Ford's running mate in 1976, with Time calling him an "able legislator and a staunch party loyalist".
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1976, he also took on the role of supporter of wide-scale, legalized abortion.
    More Details Hide Details The Appropriations bill for HHS became the battleground over this issue because it funds Medicaid. The pro-life movement fought, eventually successfully, to prohibit funding for abortions of low-income women insured by Medicaid. Brooke led the fight against restrictions in the Senate Appropriations Committee and in the House-Senate Conference until his defeat.
  • 1975
    Age 55
    In 1975, with the extension and expansion of the Voting Rights Act at stake, Brooke faced senator John Stennis (D-Mississippi) in "extended debate" and won the Senate's support for the extension.
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  • 1974
    Age 54
    In 1974, with Indiana senator Birch Bayh, Brooke led the fight to retain Title IX, a 1972 amendment to the Higher Education Act of 1965, which guarantees equal educational opportunity (including athletic participation) to girls and women.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1973
    Age 53
    Before the first year of his second term ended, Brooke became the first Republican to call on President Nixon to resign, on November 4, 1973, shortly after the Watergate-related "Saturday night massacre".
    More Details Hide Details He had risen to become the ranking Republican on the Senate Banking Committee and on two powerful Appropriations subcommittees, Labor, Health and Human Services (HHS) and Foreign Operations. From these positions, Brooke defended and strengthened the programs he supported; for example, he was a leader in enactment of the Equal Credit Act, which ensured married women the right to establish credit in their own name.
  • 1972
    Age 52
    While Nixon retained Agnew, Brooke was re-elected in 1972, defeating Democrat John J. Droney by a vote of 64%–35%.
    More Details Hide Details
    The press discussed Brooke as a possible replacement for Spiro Agnew as Nixon's running mate in the 1972 presidential election.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1969
    Age 49
    In 1969, Brooke was a leader of the bipartisan coalition that defeated the Senate confirmation of Clement Haynsworth, the President's nominee to the Supreme Court.
    More Details Hide Details A few months later, he again organized sufficient Republican support to defeat Nixon's second Supreme Court nominee Harrold Carswell. Nixon next nominated Harry A. Blackmun, who was confirmed and later wrote the Roe v. Wade opinion. Despite Brooke's disagreements with Nixon, the president reportedly respected the senator's abilities; after Nixon's election he had offered to make Brooke a member of his cabinet, or appoint him as ambassador to the UN.
    In 1969, Congress enacted the "Brooke Amendment" to the federal publicly assisted housing program which limited the tenants' out-of-pocket rent expenditure to 25 percent of their income.
    More Details Hide Details During the Nixon presidency, Brooke opposed repeated Administration attempts to close down the Job Corps and the Office of Economic Opportunity and to weaken the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—all foundational elements of President Lyndon Johnson's Great Society.
  • 1968
    Age 48
    By his second year in the Senate, Brooke had taken his place as a leading advocate against discrimination in housing and on behalf of affordable housing. With Walter Mondale, a Minnesota Democrat and fellow member of the Senate Banking Committee, he co-authored the 1968 Fair Housing Act, which prohibits discrimination in housing.
    More Details Hide Details The Act also created HUD's Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity as the primary enforcer of the law. President Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law on April 11, one week after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.. Dissatisfied with the weakened enforcement provisions that emerged from the legislative process, Brooke repeatedly proposed stronger provisions during his Senate career.
    Brooke, who supported Michigan Governor George W. Romney and New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller's bids for the 1968 GOP presidential nomination against Richard Nixon's, often differed with President Nixon on matters of social policy and civil rights.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1967
    Age 47
    In 1967, Brooke was awarded the Spingarn Medal from the NAACP.
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  • 1966
    Age 46
    In 1966, Brooke defeated former Governor Endicott Peabody with 1,213,473 votes to 744,761, and served as a United States Senator for two terms, from January 3, 1967, to January 3, 1979.
    More Details Hide Details The black vote had, Time wrote, "no measurable bearing" on the election as less than 3% of the state's population was black, and Peabody also supported civil rights for blacks. Brooke said, "I do not intend to be a national leader of the Negro people", and the magazine said that he "condemned both Stokely Carmichael and Georgia's Lester Maddox" as extremists; his historic election gave Brooke "a 50-state constituency, a power base that no other Senator can claim." A member of the moderate-to-liberal Northeastern wing of the Republican Party, Brooke organized the Senate's "Wednesday Club" of progressive Republicans who met for Wednesday lunches and strategy discussions.
    In 1966, he became the first African American popularly elected to the United States Senate.
    More Details Hide Details He was elected to the Senate as a Republican from Massachusetts, defeating former Massachusetts governor Democrat Endicott Peabody in a landslide. He served for two terms, and was defeated by Paul Tsongas in 1978. Upon the death of Harry F. Byrd, Jr. on July 30, 2013, he became the oldest living former Senator, and remained so until his death on January 3, 2015.
  • 1962
    Age 42
    He parlayed his achievements there into a successful election as Attorney General of Massachusetts in 1962; he was the first elected African-American Attorney General of any state.
    More Details Hide Details In this position, Brooke gained a reputation as a vigorous prosecutor of organized crime and corruption, securing convictions against a number of members of the Furcolo administration; an indictment against Furcolo was dismissed due to lack of evidence. He also coordinated with local police departments on the Boston strangler case, although the press mocked him for permitting an alleged psychic to participate in the investigation. Brooke was portrayed in the 1968 film dramatizing the case by William Marshall.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1950
    Age 30
    In 1950 he ran for a seat in the Massachusetts House of Representatives in both the Democratic and Republican primaries.
    More Details Hide Details Brooke won the Republican nomination, but lost the general election. Brooke made two more tries for office, including one for secretary of state, but lost both races. The loss in the secretary's race (to Kevin White, a future mayor of Boston) was particularly close. Republican leaders took notice of Brooke's potential. Governor John Volpe sought to reward Brooke for his effort, and offered him a number of jobs, most judicial in nature. Seeking a position with a higher political profile, Brooke eventually accepted the position of chairman of the Finance Commission of Boston, where he investigated financial irregularities and uncovered evidence of corruption in city affairs. He was described in the press as having "the tenacity of a terrier", and it was reported that he "restored to vigorous life an agency which many had thought moribund."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1948
    Age 28
    Following his discharge, Brooke graduated from the Boston University School of Law in 1948. "I never studied much at Howard," he reflected, "but at Boston University, I didn't do much else but study."
    More Details Hide Details His papers are stored at Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.
  • 1941
    Age 21
    Brooke graduated in 1941, and enlisted in the United States Army immediately after the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor.
    More Details Hide Details Brooke was commissioned as an officer, served five years in the Army, saw combat in Italy during World War II as a member of the segregated 366th Infantry Regiment, and earned a Bronze Star Medal. In Italy Brooke met his future wife Remigia Ferrari-Scacco, with whom he had two daughters, Remi and Edwina.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1936
    Age 16
    After graduating in 1936, he enrolled in Howard University, where he first considered medicine, but ended up studying social studies and political science.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1919
    Born
    Edward William Brooke III was born on October 26, 1919, in Washington, D.C., to Edward William Brooke, Jr. and Helen (Seldon) Brooke.
    More Details Hide Details He was the second of three children; He was raised in a middle-class section of the city, and attended Dunbar High School, then one of the most prestigious academic high schools for African Americans.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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