Eleanor Dare
Eleanor Dare
Eleanor White Dare of Westminster, London, England, was a member of the Roanoke Colony and the daughter of John White, the colony's governor. While little is known about her life, more is known about her than most of the sixteen other women who left England in 1587 as part of the Roanoke expedition. She married Ananias Dare, a London tiler and bricklayer.
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New & Noteworthy
NYTimes - over 12 years
AMERICA'S WOMEN: Four Hundred Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates, and Heroines, by Gail Collins. (Perennial/HarperCollins, $14.95.) From Eleanor Dare and the lost colony of Roanoke to Betty Friedan and the feminist rebellion of the 1970's, this sweeping social history revolves around entertaining profiles of women who shaped the nation and were
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JOURNEYS; A Colony Lost, A Tradition Lingers
NYTimes - over 12 years
THIRTY-THREE summers is an awfully long time to spend covered in body paint, whooping your way across a stage in the mosquito-drenched heat of coastal North Carolina, and last winter Bob Midgette thought seriously about hanging up his coyote-trimmed loincloth for good. ''There comes a time for everything,'' he said. But there was Mr. Midgette last
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NOTABLE BOOKS
NYTimes - about 13 years
This list has been selected from books reviewed since the Holiday Books issue of December 2002. It is meant to suggest some of the high points in this year's fiction and poetry, nonfiction, children's books, mysteries and science fiction. The books are arranged alphabetically under genre headings.The complete reviews of these books may be found at
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And Bear In Mind
NYTimes - over 13 years
(Editors' choices of other recent books of particular interest) THE FIFTH BOOK OF PEACE, by Maxine Hong Kingston. (Knopf, $26.) Compounding fiction with memory, as she did in ''The Woman Warrior,'' Kingston transmutes a manuscript she lost in a firestorm into part of this book, which presents hope as an obligation, set over against the despair so
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The American Majority
NYTimes - over 13 years
AMERICA'S WOMEN Four Hundred Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates and Heroines. By Gail Collins. Illustrated. 556 pp. New York: William Morrow. $27.95. A GENERATION ago, ''America's Women'' amounted to 10 words (and one letter): Susan B. Anthony, Clara Barton, Helen Keller, Betsy Ross, Harriet Tubman. On a good day, or perhaps as an admonition, a
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Drought May Have Doomed the Lost Colony
NYTimes - almost 19 years
On Aug. 18, 1587, on a coastal island called Roanoke in what is now North Carolina, a couple named Ananias and Eleanor Dare produced a daughter and named her Virginia, in honor of both the colony where they lived and of Elizabeth I, known as England's virgin queen. The baby, as schoolbooks have long noted, was the first English child born in
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OPERA: RALEIGH'S STORY
NYTimes - over 32 years
''Raleigh's Dream,'' a new opera with words and music by Iain Hamilton, received its world premiere here Sunday night as part of a two-week British-American Festival at Duke University. The festival commemorates the 400th anniversary of Sir Walter Raleigh's pioneering Roanoke expeditions from England to what is now the coast of North Carolina.
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Eleanor Dare
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  • 1587
    Died in 1587.
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    It is known that she gave birth to Virginia Dare, the first child of English parents born in North America, on August 18, 1587, shortly after their arrival, and that, along with everyone else in the "Lost Colony", she disappeared while her father went to get supplies back in England.
    More Details Hide Details In her 2000 book Roanoke: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Colony, anthropologist Lee Miller speculates that Eleanor and the other members of the Roanoke Colony were religious Separatists who left England at a time when the political climate in England was dangerous for such religious dissidents. She suggests that this might be why the colonists, two of whom were pregnant women and several of whom were parents with young children, were willing to undertake the dangerous journey to Roanoke Island with low supplies and at a time England was on the verge of war with Spain. The colonists, including the women, signed a petition urging White to return to England for supplies, even though he was reluctant to leave his daughter and granddaughter. Miller suggests that this democratic action would have been typical of a religious Separatist group. John Smith and other members of the Jamestown Colony sought information about the fate of the colonists in 1607. One report indicated that the Lost Colonists took refuge with friendly Chesapeake Indians, but Chief Powhatan claimed his tribe had attacked the group and killed most of the colonists. Powhatan showed Smith certain artifacts he said had belonged to the colonists, including a musket barrel and a brass mortar. The Jamestown Colony received reports of some survivors of the Lost Colony and sent out search parties, but none were successful. Eventually they determined they were all dead.
  • 1568
    Born in 1568.
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