Elissa Landi
Actor
Elissa Landi
Elissa Landi was an Italian born actress who was popular in Hollywood films of the 1920s and 1930s. Rumoured to be a descendant of Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria, she was noted for her aristocratic bearing. Born Elisabeth Marie Christine Kühnelt in Venice, Landi was raised in Austria and educated in England. From 1928 to 1936, Landi was married to John Cecil Lawrence, and from 1943 to 1948, to Curtis Kinney Thomas (1905-2002).
Biography
Elissa Landi's personal information overview.
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News
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The Sign of the Cross (1932) - Gayworld.be
Google News - over 5 years
In deze film schitteren filmsterren Fredrich March, Elissa Landi, Claudette Colbert en Charles Laughton, samen met Ian Keith en Arthur Hohl. De film is de derde en de laatste in DeMille's bijbelse trilogie met “The Ten Commandments” (1923) en “The King
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What's On Today
NYTimes - about 7 years
10 P.M. and 11:30 P.M. (ABC) DICK CLARK'S NEW YEAR'S ROCKIN' EVE WITH RYAN SEACREST 2010 Dick Clark and Ryan Seacrest host the annual New Year's Eve party in New York with performances in Times Square by Jennifer Lopez and Daughtry. In Las Vegas, Fergie picks up hosting duties with live performances there by the Black Eyed Peas, Selena Gomez,
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Critic's Choice: New DVD's
NYTimes - almost 11 years
The Cecil B. DeMille Collection Film directors frequently received top billing in silent movies, and it wasn't until the factory system imposed by Irving Thalberg and others succeeded in diminishing the independence of the director that their names dropped below the title. Among the few exceptions to that rule in the 1930's and 40's were Frank
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MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - almost 13 years
YOU may never see the bad stuff coming in Karen Moncrieff's intense, restrained, superbly acted BLUE CAR (2002). This is a drama about a teenage girl (Agnes Bruckner) suffocating at home, where her stressed, overscheduled divorced mother (Margaret Colin) rules. Then her little sister dies. Thank goodness there's a concerned, intelligent teacher
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MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - almost 13 years
IN George Clooney's he says. ''How dare you subject the rest of the world to your loathsome views of humanity?'' That's what a guy gets for creating ''The Gong Show,'' ''The Dating Game'' and ''The Newlywed Game.'' But this film is also about Mr. Barris's other career (he says): international assassin. The narrative is a little murky, but Mr.
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FILM; A Vengeful Count and The Wages Of Revenge
NYTimes - about 15 years
IN an age of short attention spans, is it any wonder revenge has gone out of fashion? I mean the way in which a wronged person may harbor hurt for decades. It's the fury in Scarlett O'Hara that vowed never to go hungry again. You see it in the monstrous Feraud (Harvey Keitel) in Ridley Scott's ''Duellists,'' pursuing his enemy for 15 years. It's
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Metropolitan Diary
NYTimes - almost 17 years
DEAR DIARY: I live in Kittery, Me., but work in New York occasionally. Many of my friends at home think I am a nut for diving into the New York experience regularly. This incident, which seemed very un-New York and at the same time very New York, is one of the reasons I do it. I left a showroom in SoHo just before 6 p.m. and headed across Spring
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 20 years
MOVIES on television this week offer a spin across the map, from Connecticut to Florida to ancient Rome. Nunnally Johnson's direction brought a probling intelligence to THE MAN IN THE GRAY FLANNEL SUIT (1956), from the Sloan Wilson best seller about a Manhattan commuter exec taking inventory. Gregory Peck, in a becoming role and performance, is
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 21 years
AN edge of suspense marks some choice films on television this week. Even with its limp title, AFTER THE THIN MAN (1936) rang the whodunit bell again for all concerned -- William Powell and Myrna Loy (and Asta), the screenwriters Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, and the director W. S. Van Dyke. Murder (and martinis) in San Francisco involve
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Home Video
NYTimes - almost 22 years
This fall, makers of video games will step up the action. As 16-bit games begin to fade, more powerful 32-bit games will take their place. And beyond 32-bit lies 64-bit. "You have to keep raising the bar," said Howard Lincoln, the chairman of Nintendo of America. "You've got to give players more. The next game has to be better than the last." The
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At the Movies
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: Nazis in America Nazis in America ''I was very surprised to read that something like 10,000 war criminals were able to come to the United States after the Second World War,'' Costa-Gavras said. ''You discover at the same time the law didn't permit the Jewish refugees coming out from the camps to come to the United States. It was a kind of
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Best Films on TV
NYTimes - over 34 years
'Count of Monte Cristo' Once or twice a year, with little fanfare and an obscure schedule slot, ''The Count of Monte Cristo'' (1934) sails into view on the home screen. Here it is again, at family viewing time - Sunday at 1 P.M. on NBC - and hallelujah! They simply don't bother making them like this anymore: a sweeping, full-rigged adventure with a
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Best Films on TV
NYTimes - almost 35 years
Should this Sunday afternoon be a fine, sunny one, chances are few people will stay indoors to watch anything, let alone "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (1969) at 2:30 P.M. on Channel 5. But those who do will see a treat - an appealing, pungent seriocomic Western, with Paul Newman, Robert Redford and Katherine Ross. The week's latelate
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WHEN MOVIE STARS TOOK ON THE BARD
NYTimes - about 35 years
''Shakespeare in Hollywood'' is not, as the title suggests, a collection of excerpts from those very few Hollywood movies that ventured into the risky realm of Shakespearean drama. It is, perhaps, an even more remarkable curiosity - a transcription of a longforgotten radio series that the CBS network ran for eight weeks in the summer of 1937,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Elissa Landi
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