Elizabeth Montgomery
Actress
Elizabeth Montgomery
Elizabeth Victoria Montgomery was an American film and television actress whose career spanned five decades, best known as Samantha Stephens in Bewitched. She also notably portrayed Ellen Harrod in A Case of Rape and Lizzie Borden in The Legend of Lizzie Borden.
Biography
Elizabeth Montgomery's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Elizabeth Montgomery
News
News abour Elizabeth Montgomery from around the web
25 Stars who grew up in Hollywood's limelight - CTV.ca
Google News - over 5 years
She is set to appear in a biography about Elizabeth Montgomery, of 'Bewitched' fame in the upcoming film 'Everything Is Going to Be Just Fine,' due to be released in 2011. She also recently gave birth to her first child -- daughter Sadie Grace LeNoble
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The Livestream Diaries: Astana pulls a “Bewitched” - velonews.competitor.com
Google News - over 5 years
When Dick York, (who co-starred as Elizabeth Montgomery's husband, Darrin Stephens) suffered a debilitating back injury, executives took the unusual step of replacing him mid-series. Without explanation, the show's sixth season debuted with a new
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'Love Letters' Showing One Night Only at the Playhouse - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Many prolific actors have graced the stage in the roles of Melissa Gardner and Andrew Makepeace Ladd III such as Elizabeth Montgomery and Robert Foxworth, Christopher Walken, Victor Garber, and Stockard Channing to name a few. As recently as 2007,
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The lovely Bewitched set for a big return! - The People Speak Out
Google News - over 5 years
Elizabeth Montgomery and Dick York were truly a couple made in heaven when they starred in the famous Bewitched tv show, from 1964 to 1972. Actually Mr. York was replaced later by Dick Sargeant also finding success among the audience
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'Bewitched' remake: Casting suggestions for Samantha and both Darrins - Zap2it.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Then, as it tends to do, our minds wandered to casting the roles of suburban wife and witch Samantha (played by Elizabeth Montgomery in the 1964-72 series) and her mortal husband Darrin (played by Dick York for five seasons, then by Dick Sargent)
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CBS Conjuring Up New Bewitched Series - Cinema Blend
Google News - over 5 years
The original 1964 series starred Elizabeth Montgomery as suburban house-witch Samantha Stevens and two separate Dicks (York and Sargent, respectively) over the course of the show as her put-upon husband, Darrin. Magical hijinks ensued on a weekly basis ... - -
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Johnny Cool - WhatDVD.Net
Google News - over 5 years
He was also married to actress Elizabeth Montgomery at the time, which may explain her presence in Johnny Cool. The film is a character study of sorts about a cold-hearted assassin who grew up as a bandit named Salvatore Giordano (Silva) in Sicily
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Holding on to the Cold War - Military.com
Google News - over 5 years
You also get Elizabeth Montgomery, incredibly sexy in a rare feature film performance and a great Billy May score. It's hard to figure why this one's been never been on DVD before. Henry Silva's not exactly a big star but his association with Sinatra
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University of Alabama honors lists - Tuscaloosa News
Google News - over 5 years
... Donald Allen Miller, Mallary K. Miller, Tyler B. Mills, Savannah L. Millsaps, April C. Mitchell, Jessica B. Mitchell, Justin F. Mixon, Madeline Anne Mogg, Chauntel Elizabeth Montgomery, William Allan Montgomery, Alecia B. Moore, Brian L. Moore Jr.,
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'Original Intent': The Shepherd's Way Church to host 'God and Country' Sunday - Sealy News
Google News - over 5 years
This year's program will include the presentation of colors, the Pledge of Allegiance, the national anthem, and a special guest singer from Tennessee, Elizabeth Montgomery. The scenes will follow, with patriotic singing between most of them
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Yuma County's Most Wanted 6-27-11 - Yuma Sun
Google News - over 5 years
Aliases: Deborah Elizabeth Montgomery, Deborah Elizabeth Borgers, Debbie Cain. Her probation violations are for the original convictions of criminal trespass and possession of drug paraphernalia, both Class 6 felonies. Eric Aguirre-Barrena — Male, 26
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A bewitching clubhouse scene | Philadelphia Inquirer | 2011-06-23 - Philadelphia Inquirer
Google News - over 5 years
Sitting in front of a flat-screen TV, a shirtless Jimmy Rollins was watching Elizabeth Montgomery in Bewitched. "Mick wanted to watch it," Rollins said, referring to bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer. "I let him enjoy it."
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The List: Father-and-daughter movie stars - Washington Times
Google News - over 5 years
Robert and Elizabeth Montgomery — Robert won an Oscar nomination as a psychopath in the 1937 chiller “Night Must Fall.” He became known on television for “Robert Montgomery Presents,” an American dramatic television series shown on by NBC from 1950-57
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Elizabeth Montgomery
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1995
    Age 61
    Her last television series was the highly rated Edna Buchanan detective series – the second and final film of the series received its first airing on May 9, 1995, only nine days before Montgomery died.
    More Details Hide Details
    Early on the morning of May 18, 1995, Montgomery died at home eight weeks after her diagnosis.
    More Details Hide Details She was 62. On June 18, 1995, a memorial service was held at the Canon Theatre in Beverly Hills. Herbie Hancock provided the music, and Dominick Dunne spoke about their early days as friends in New York City. Other speakers included her husband, Robert Foxworth, who read sympathy cards from fans, her nurse, her brother, her daughter, and her stepson. Her body was cremated at Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery. Montgomery had a summer home in Patterson, Putnam County, New York. Following her death, the estate was sold to New York State and became Wonder Lake State Park.
    She had ignored the influenza-like symptoms during the filming of Deadline for Murder: From the Files of Edna Buchanan, which she finished filming in late March 1995.
    More Details Hide Details By the time the cancer was diagnosed, it was too late for medical intervention. With no hope of recovery and unwilling to die in a hospital, she chose to return to the Beverly Hills home that she shared with Foxworth.
    In the spring of 1995, Montgomery was diagnosed with colorectal cancer.
    More Details Hide Details
    In January 1995, she recorded the 1952 edition of the best-selling book of poetry titled When We Were Very Young for Learning Ally.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1994
    Age 60
    In 1994, Montgomery produced several radio and television public-service announcements for the organization's Los Angeles Unit.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1993
    Age 59
    On January 28, 1993, she married for a fourth time to actor Robert Foxworth, after living with him for nearly twenty years.
    More Details Hide Details She remained married to Foxworth until her death.
  • 1992
    Age 58
    In June 1992, Montgomery and her former Bewitched co-star Dick Sargent, who had remained good friends, were Grand Marshals at the Los Angeles Gay Pride Parade.
    More Details Hide Details Throughout the last year of her life, Montgomery was a volunteer for the Los Angeles Unit of Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization which records educational books on specially formatted CDs and in downloadable formats for disabled people.
  • 1989
    Age 55
    Montgomery returned to Broadway one last time in 1989 in a production of Love Letters, opposite Robert Foxworth.
    More Details Hide Details One of her last roles was in an episode of Batman: The Animated Series entitled "Showdown", in which she played a barmaid; this was also her final work to be screened, since the episode aired posthumously.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1972
    Age 38
    As a consolation to ABC, Montgomery and Asher (under their company name Ashmont, which produced Bewitched) offered a half-hour sitcom, The Paul Lynde Show, to the network for the 1972–1973 season.
    More Details Hide Details Lynde's series lasted only one year. In a parody of her Samantha Stephens role, she made a cameo appearance as a witch at the end of the beach party film How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965). This was directed by William Asher, her husband at the time. That same year she also provided the voice of Samantha for an episode of the animated series The Flintstones. Montgomery received five Emmy and four Golden Globe nominations for her role on Bewitched. The show added to the increasing popularity of the name Samantha. It was first recorded in 18th-century New England with an unknown etymology, and, while its use was relatively rare until 1958, it has remained consistently popular since 1965 due chiefly to Montgomery's character. Montgomery returned to Samantha-like twitching of her nose and on-screen magic in a series of Japanese television commercials (1980–83) for "Mother" chocolate biscuits and cookies by confectionery conglomerate Lotte Corp. These Japanese commercials provided a substantial salary for Montgomery while she remained out of sight of non-Japanese fans and the Hollywood industry.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1963
    Age 29
    In 1963, Montgomery was featured in a role as a socialite who falls for a gangster (Henry Silva) in Johnny Cool, directed by William Asher, and the film comedy Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed?, with Dean Martin and Carol Burnett, this time directed by Daniel Mann.
    More Details Hide Details After her appearance on Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Alfred Hitchcock had her in mind to play the sister-in-law of Sean Connery, who sees herself as a rival to the troubled heroine in the movie Marnie (1964), but Montgomery was unavailable. Montgomery played the central role of lovable witch Samantha Stephens with Dick York (and later with Dick Sargent) as her husband in the ABC situation comedy Bewitched. Starting in the second season of the series, she also played the role of Samantha's mischievous cousin, Serena, under the pseudonym Pandora Spocks. Bewitched became a ratings success (it was, at the time, the highest-rated series ever for the network). The series aired for eight seasons, from 1964 to 1972, and despite low ratings, it was renewed for a ninth season to run from 1972 to 1973. However, Elizabeth Montgomery's marriage to Bewitched director William Asher was in trouble and the couple had separated by the end of the eighth season, causing severe friction in their professional relationship and ending any possibility of another season.
  • 1960
    Age 26
    In 1960, Montgomery was nominated for an Emmy Award for her portrayal of southern prostitute Rusty Heller in an episode of The Untouchables, playing opposite David White, who later portrayed Darrin's boss Larry Tate in Bewitched.
    More Details Hide Details She played the part of Rose Cornelius in the Rawhide episode "Incident at El Crucero" (1963).
  • 1956
    Age 22
    She was married to Academy Award-winning actor Gig Young from 1956 to 1963, and then to director-producer William Asher from 1963 until their 1973 divorce.
    More Details Hide Details They had three children: William Asher, Jr. (July 24, 1964), Robert Asher (October 5, 1965), and Rebecca Asher (June 17, 1969). The latter two pregnancies were incorporated into Bewitched as Samantha's pregnancies with Tabitha and Adam Stephens. During the 8th year of the show Elizabeth fell in love with director Richard Michaels. Their affair ended both their marriages and the series as well. They moved in together at the end of shooting in 1972. The relationship lasted 2 ½ years.
    Montgomery returned to Broadway in 1956, appearing in The Loud Red Patrick.
    More Details Hide Details Montgomery's early career consisted of starring vehicles and appearances in live television dramas and series, such as Studio One, Kraft Television Theater, Johnny Staccato, Burke's Law, The Twilight Zone, The Eleventh Hour, Boris Karloff's Thriller, and Alfred Hitchcock Presents.
  • 1954
    Age 20
    Montgomery's first marriage was to New York socialite Frederick Gallatin Cammann in 1954; the couple divorced less than a year later.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1953
    Age 19
    Montgomery made her television debut on her father's series Robert Montgomery Presents (later appearing on occasion as a member of his "summer stock" company of performers). In October 1953, Montgomery made her debut on Broadway, starring in Late Love, for which she won a Theater World Award for her performance.
    More Details Hide Details She then made her film debut in Otto Preminger's The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell (1955).
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1933
    Born
    Montgomery was born on April 15, 1933, in Los Angeles, California, the daughter of actor Robert Montgomery and his wife, Broadway actress Elizabeth Daniel Bryan Montgomery (née Allen), a native of Kentucky.
    More Details Hide Details She had an older sister, Martha Bryan Montgomery, who died as an infant (named after her aunt Martha-Bryan Allen) and a younger brother, Robert Montgomery, Jr. (1936–2000). Montgomery was of Irish and Scottish descent. Her great-grandfather, Archibald Montgomery, was born in Belfast, and emigrated to the United States in 1849. Genealogical research conducted after Montgomery's death revealed that Montgomery and accused 19th-century murderer Lizzie Borden were sixth cousins once removed, both descending from 17th-century Massachusetts resident John Luther. Montgomery later played Borden, not knowing of their real-life relationship. She attended Westlake School for Girls (now Harvard-Westlake School in Holmby Hills). After graduating from Spence School in New York City, she attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts for three years.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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