Elliott Roosevelt
Army officer and author
Elliott Roosevelt
Elliott Roosevelt was a United States Army Air Forces officer and an author. Roosevelt was the second surviving son of U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. After World War II, Roosevelt was called by a Senate subcommittee to testify about financial irregularities in which he had taken part regarding a contract for the experimental Hughes XF-11 reconnaissance aircraft.
Biography
Elliott Roosevelt's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Elliott Roosevelt from around the web
Hyde Park movie theater, drive-in have illustrious history - Poughkeepsie Journal
Google News - over 5 years
The theater, established in 1950 by brother-in-laws Sidney Cohen and Phil Eisenberg and Elliott Roosevelt, the son of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, was the first of the two venues to open. Cohen and Eisenberg were already independent theater owners;
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The Goldsmiths, Part CXCVII - Gold Seek
Google News - over 5 years
The letter is also reportedly presented in this reference: “FDR: His Personal Letters, 1928-1945, edited by Elliott Roosevelt (New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1950), pg. 373.” In my reading of the letter, the context was that this secret power over
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Ed Asner brings FDR to life - MiamiHerald.com
Google News - over 5 years
I read [son] Elliott Roosevelt's book, and the recent one on Roosevelt's Supreme Court justices. All of these characters were bigger than life. Bigger than these midgets we are now dominated by. How much do you try to embody FDR vs. capturing his
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Is the IRS sending a message? - American Thinker (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
"My father," Elliott Roosevelt observed of his famous parent, "may have been the originator of the concept of employing the IRS as a weapon of political retribution." The Obama administration may be following a similar path
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Dette US : Prêts pour le grand plouf du $ ? - AgoraVox
Google News - almost 6 years
Extrait de "Mon père m'a dit" (As He Saw It), par Elliott Roosevelt, chapitre II : "Churchill s'était levé et arpentait la pièce, en parlant avec de grands gestes. Enfin, il s'arrêta, regarda longuement, en silence, mon père, puis agitant son index
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Roosevelts and Quirks of Destiny; Descendants Following Divergent Paths
NYTimes - almost 12 years
The jaw is pure Roosevelt, thrust out with the kind of patrician confidence that shepherded America through the Great Depression and World War II. But in at least one surprising way Joshua Boettiger, the 31-year-old great-grandson of Franklin and Eleanor, is not a Roosevelt in the classic aristocratic mold. He is studying to be a rabbi, working
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THE WAY WE LIVE NOW: 11-10-02; Knocked Off
NYTimes - over 14 years
Random House is looking for someone to carry on the work of Mario Puzo, who died three years ago. Interested? They're eager for a sequel to his novel ''The Godfather'' -- as any publisher would be who pays attention to the HBO ratings on Sunday evening -- and to make it happen they would like to sign up a writer who is in roughly the same place as
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THE 2000 CAMPAIGN: THE TEXAS GOVERNOR; Bush Criticizes Gore for Wanting to Use Petroleum Supply
NYTimes - over 16 years
Gov. George W. Bush today criticized Vice President Al Gore's call to tap the nation's petroleum reserves as ''bad policy'' that sought ''short-term political gain at the cost of long-term national security.'' On a day when high gasoline prices moved to the center of the presidential race, Mr. Bush and his running mate, Dick Cheney, turned to the
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19 Gramercy Park S. And Stanford White
NYTimes - almost 17 years
To the Editor: I found the Streetscapes article on 19 Gramercy Park South [''An 1880's House That Asks, 'What's in a Name?','' Feb. 20] of great interest. I thought that I might shed some further light on the question of whether Stanford White participated in redesigning portions of the interior for the Stuyvesant Fishes. When I was researching my
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E.R.
NYTimes - over 17 years
Eleanor Roosevelt Volume 2: 1933-1938. By Blanche Wiesen Cook. Illustrated. 686 pp. New York: Viking. $34.95. For many years I had, hanging in my kitchen, a wonderful picture of Eleanor Roosevelt, smiling saucily in a cream satin Jean Harlow-style gown. Though she was proud to be F.D.R.'s ''hair shirt,'' she liked pretty clothes. And I loved seeing
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Betsey Cushing Whitney Is Dead at 89
NYTimes - almost 19 years
Betsey Cushing Roosevelt Whitney, the widow of John Hay (Jock) Whitney, the first wife of James Roosevelt and the last of the three glamorous Cushing sisters of Boston, died yesterday at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. She was 89. Mrs. Whitney was one of the most prestigious figures in New York society, although she disliked
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Keep in Mind
NYTimes - over 20 years
"FATHER'S DAY WEEKEND," part of the "Roses! Roses! Roses!" celebration at the New York Botanical Garden, 200th Street and Southern Boulevard, Bedford Park, the Bronx. Featured for dads are informal tours of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden, tomorrow and Sunday from 1 to 4 P.M. A harpist is to perform tomorrow from 2 to 4 P.M., and the Goldman
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Miss Roosevelt Weds Seth Kelly
NYTimes - over 25 years
Elizabeth Roosevelt, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Roosevelt Jr. of Dallas and Sylvan Beach, Mich., was married yesterday to Seth Thomas Kelly, the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Kelly of Dallas and Greensboro, Vt. The Rev. Gilbert Bowen performed the Episcopal ceremony at the Church at Sylvan Beach. Mrs. Kelly, 26 years old, is an environmental
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Corrections
NYTimes - over 26 years
An obituary last Sunday about Elliott Roosevelt, a son of Franklin D. Roosevelt, misstated his order of birth in the family. He was the third child of Franklin and Eleanor; their daughter, Anna, was the first and James was the second.
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Elliott Roosevelt, General and Author, Dies at 80
NYTimes - over 26 years
Elliott Roosevelt, a World War II Air Corps general, a breeder of Arabian horses and an author whose works included a series of mystery novels that cast his mother, the First Lady, as an amateur detective, died yesterday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 80 years old. Mr. Roosevelt died of congestive heart failure, his wife, the former
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New & Noteworthy
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: BARBARIAN SENTIMENTS: How the American Century Ends, by William Pfaff. (Noonday/Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $8.95.) Even after disasters like Vietnam and Iran, William Pfaff argues, the United States still hasn't learned the folly of trying to make over the world in its own image. ''He cements his reputation . IN SOUTHERN LIGHT: Trekking Through
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OBSERVER; Neil Bush, Meet Mr. Kafka
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: A terrible thing is happening to President Bush's youngest son, Neil. He is in danger of being turned into a sound bite. A terrible thing is happening to President Bush's youngest son, Neil. He is in danger of being turned into a sound bite. Franz Kafka created a fictional man who turned into a cockroach. Being turned into a sound bite may be
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Books of The Times; Comrades in Arms: A U.S.-Soviet Memoir
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: Remembering War A U.S.-Soviet Dialogue. By Helene Keyssar and Vladimir Pozner 254 pages. Illustrated. Oxford University Press. $27.95. Remembering War A U.S.-Soviet Dialogue. By Helene Keyssar and Vladimir Pozner 254 pages. Illustrated. Oxford University Press. $27.95. In April 1945, elements of the United States First Army met with Soviet
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Elliott Roosevelt
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1990
    Age 79
    Died on October 27, 1990.
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  • 1984
    Age 73
    Eleanor Roosevelt, with Love: A Centenary Remembrance, came out in 1984.
    More Details Hide Details While all of FDR's sons attracted public controversy, Elliott and his elder brother James were scandal-plagued throughout their lives. When Elliott Roosevelt published his defense of his father's foreign policy As He Saw It in 1946, he triggered a long-standing historiographical dispute over the truthfulness of his recollections of the wartime summits. Many historians were very dubious of the strident anti-English and pro-Soviet tone, and some (including the FBI) thought Elliott used a ghost writer, who "was a communist." A young Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. opined that other memoirs would have to confirm Elliott's accounts before they could be taken at face value. When Winston Churchill published his history of the war five years later, he pronounced Elliott's stories "rubbish." Still, the frequent absence of detailed minutes leads historians to rely considerably on As He Saw It, and even the official Foreign Relations of the United States (Foreign Relations Series) sometimes fills in the gaps with Elliott's details.
  • 1977
    Age 66
    Mother R.: Eleanor Roosevelt's Untold Story, also with Brough, was published in 1977; The Conservators, a political book, in 1982.
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  • 1975
    Age 64
    A sequel to An Untold Story with James Brough, published in 1975 and titled A Rendezvous With Destiny, carried the Roosevelt saga to the end of World War II.
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  • 1973
    Age 62
    In 1973 he was accused of involvement in an assassination plot on the Bahamanian Prime Minister during the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations hearings on corruption.
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    Published in 1973, the biography also contains valuable insights into FDR's run for vice-president, his rise to the governorship of New York, and his capture of the presidency in 1932, particularly with the help of Louis McHenry Howe.
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  • 1972
    Age 61
    He emigrated to Portugal in 1972, but left for England after the revolution in 1975.
    More Details Hide Details He moved back to the United States, living in Bellevue, Washington, Indian Wells, California, and finally Scottsdale, Arizona. As Roosevelt approached his eightieth year, his final ambition was to "outlive James." However, Roosevelt died at age 80 of heart and liver failure. Brother James died 10 months later in August 1991. Elliott authored numerous books, including a mystery series in which his mother, Eleanor Roosevelt, is the detective. However, these murder mysteries were researched and written by William Harrington. They continued until Harrington's death in 2000, ten years after Elliott's death. Roosevelt described his experiences with his father during five important war conferences in his best-selling book As He Saw It. He also edited FDR: His Personal Letters, published after the war in four volumes. With James Brough, Roosevelt wrote a highly personal book about his parents called The Roosevelts of Hyde Park: An Untold Story, in which he revealed details about the sexual lives of his parents, including his father's relationships with mistress Lucy Mercer and secretary Marguerite ("Missy") LeHand as well as graphic details surrounding the illness that crippled his father.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1968
    Age 57
    In 1968, he and an "alleged mobster front man," Michael J. McLaney, offered Louis P. Mastriana $100,000 to assassinate Prime Minister Lynden O. Pindling.
    More Details Hide Details He was paid $10,000 up front, most of which came from Elliott Roosevelt (as proved by a signature on a check for the money). The assassination plot was conceived after Prime Minister Pindling's failure to issue to a gambling license to an associate of Meyer Lansky, (whom Michael J. McLaney worked for until his conviction in 1971). It was uncovered by Mastriana; he taped all of his conversation with Elliott Roosevelt allegedly using equipment from the US Postal Service. Elliott maintained that this was a lie until his death. Roosevelt was married five times: Roosevelt's military decorations and awards include: Notes Bibliography
  • FORTIES
  • 1952
    Age 41
    After Elliott moved to Miami Beach and Havana with his fourth wife, in 1952, his brother John bought the Hyde Park tract.
    More Details Hide Details Later, the property became Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site. Roosevelt pursued many different careers during his life, including owning a pre-war radio station network (Texas State Network) in Texas and living as a rancher. After brief ventures in Cuba and Colorado, he was involved (not criminally) with a bank embezzlement scandal in Sheldon, Iowa (1960). He again moved to Florida and was elected mayor of Miami Beach, Florida (1965), being unseated two stormy years later. After a business career marked by ties to organized crime, he was investigated by the Senate ("Jackson Committee") in 1973.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1947
    Age 36
    In 1947 she bought from the FDR estate Val-Kill farms, the home she lived in after FDR's death, and deeded the property to Roosevelt.
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    As part of the ongoing "Investigation of the National Defense Program", on August 4, 1947 the subcommittee called Roosevelt and Meyer to testify about the Hollywood and Manhattan parties and women that Meyer had arranged and paid for.
    More Details Hide Details Meyer's extensive financial records during such parties showed him paying $200 for "presents for four girls" and $50 for "girls at hotel (late)." At one point, Roosevelt asked Meyer whether "any of those girls who were paid, were they procured for my entertainment?" Meyer responded "I don't like the word 'procured,' because a girl who attends a party and is given a present is not necessarily 'procured.'" The committee found that Meyer had spent at least $1,000 in picking up Roosevelt's hotel bills as well as his nightclub and party checks, and Faye Emerson's bets at Agua Caliente Racetrack, and that Meyer had arranged for weekends in Palm Springs and Washington, D.C. for Roosevelt and Emerson, who eventually married in December 1944 after Roosevelt divorced his second wife in March 1944. The wedding at the Grand Canyon was also paid for by Meyer.
    In 1947, Roosevelt telephoned Hughes to warn him that a Senate subcommittee (the "Brewster Committee," formerly the "Truman Committee") intended to call them both to account for financial irregularities regarding the XF-11 as well as for Hughes' H-4 Hercules, popularly known as the "Spruce Goose".
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  • 1945
    Age 34
    Roosevelt stated that he flew 89 combat missions and 470 combat hours prior to being called back for his father's funeral in April 1945 (he did not return to active theaters).
    More Details Hide Details These numbers are disputed. His decorations included the Distinguished Flying Cross. He also received the Order of the British Empire, the Croix de Guerre and Legion d'Honneur, the Moroccan Order of Ouissam Alaouite, and the U.S. Legion of Merit. He ended the war holding the Air Medal with reportedly eleven clusters. As a chase pilot for the Operation Aphrodite flights in 1944, Roosevelt said he witnessed the death of Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. over Blythburgh, England (there is no evidence in Aphrodite files that Roosevelt participated in this project, nor did he fly as chase pilot and witness the death of Joseph P. Kennedy. reference: 519.428-1 Aphrodite. Reel No. A5687, Air Force Historical Research Agency, Maxwell AFB, Alabama). After the war, Roosevelt no longer played a significant role in aviation, although he maintained a private pilot's license and owned a small aircraft. He briefly served as president of short-lived Empire Airlines of New York (1946), citing his influence with the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB), which however did not result in route awards. Reported attempts to assist Howard Hughes' TWA in obtaining air routes to the USSR also did not succeed.
    Roosevelt continued in that rank in Europe until his father's death on April 12, 1945.
    More Details Hide Details After VE-Day, the Air Forces could no longer find a "suitable vacancy" for him, and he was on leave and had staff duties in the United States. By coincidence, his last day of service was VJ-Day. Roosevelt commanded the following units:
    Following threats of resignation and pressure from "very high topside," in January 1945 General Arnold ordered General Carl Spaatz in England to appoint Roosevelt a rated pilot, and the President submitted his son's name to the Senate for promotion to brigadier general.
    More Details Hide Details By standard rules, Roosevelt was eligible for the rank, but not for the pilot's wings.
    Despite having poor eyesight and being classified 4-F (unfit), he also became a pilot and reportedly flew 89 combat missions by the time of his inactivation from the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) in August 1945.
    More Details Hide Details While Elliott operated from Gander in August 1941, FDR detached him and brother Franklin Jr. to attend the Argentia (Atlantic Charter) summit between Churchill and FDR. In January 1943, Roosevelt accompanied FDR as a military attaché to the Casablanca meeting and the subsequent Cairo and Tehran Conferences in November–December 1943. At a dinner during the Tehran Conference, Joseph Stalin proposed to round up and shoot some fifty thousand officers and technicians after the war, to permanently incapacitate Germany. Roosevelt spoke in favor of the proposal which earned him Stalin's cheers and the vocal and lasting hostility of Churchill who said "I would rather be taken out into the garden here and now and be shot myself". Following a navigator/bombardier course in the fall of 1941 and a brief stint on antisubmarine patrol duty with the 6th Reconnaissance Squadron at Muroc AAB, Roosevelt received a top-secret assignment to carry out clandestine reconnaissance flights over the Sahara, with emphasis on French West Africa, with which the United States was not at war. Having been successful with this (Project Rusty), he was given command of the new 3d Reconnaissance Group at Colorado Springs. From Gibraltar and then Oran, Algeria, he led this unit in Operation Torch, the invasion of Northwest Africa in early November 1942. Elliott (with a pilot) flew the first U.S. reconnaissance missions over the theater in a borrowed RAF de Havilland Mosquito.
    He served as a procurement specialist, navigator, and intelligence and reconnaissance officer and rose to brigadier general by January 1945.
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  • 1944
    Age 33
    Most famously, Elliott claimed that he nearly lost his life when flying through the fireball of the explosion that killed Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. in August 1944.
    More Details Hide Details Air Force records show that a Mosquito photographic airplane did indeed suffer this dramatic fate, but its crew was a pilot and a photographer under Roosevelt's command, and Elliott's participation is unmentioned in official accounts. Elliott's New York Times obituary claimed that he had been twice wounded, and his widow had written (I Love a Roosevelt, 1965) that he had received four purple hearts ("for each of the four times he was wounded"). His discharge papers explicitly state that he was not wounded (although he had close calls in aircraft). Consequently, the Veterans Administration rejected his disability claims. The question of Elliott's veracity in his wartime conference memoirs belongs in context with the many other scandals and controversies he was involved in throughout his career. Congress investigated Elliott numerous times: for the attempted sale of bombers to the USSR (1934); for allegations of broadcast industry corruption (1937–45); for the Blaze affair (his dog's travel on emergency war priority, 1945); for his promotion to general, demanded by his father (1945); for the Hartford loan scandal (1945); for his denunciation of U.S. foreign policy during a visit to the USSR (capped with a visit with Stalin) (1946); for the Hughes F-11 purchase (1947); and for involvement with organized crime and securities fraud in Miami and the Bahamas (1973). Of Elliott's wide-ranging activities, many others attracted political or law enforcement interest, but charges were never referred to the Justice Department.
  • 1941
    Age 30
    In the summer of 1941, Roosevelt searched for and located air base sites in Labrador, Baffin Island, and Greenland, and reported on conditions in Iceland and along the rest of the embryonic North Atlantic ferry route.
    More Details Hide Details During this time, he coordinated closely with FDR, Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and General Arnold. Elliott Roosevelt was the first to interest Churchill in American bases in Africa (first, Bathurst in the Gambia, now Banjul), a step for which his father was not yet ready.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1940
    Age 29
    His appointment in the middle of the 1940 election campaign caused a furious political row, although General Henry H. Arnold, the Chief of the Air Corps, asserted that there was no pressure or nepotism involved.
    More Details Hide Details After brief service at Wright Field, Ohio, Elliott took an intelligence course and served with the 21st Reconnaissance Squadron at the new U.S. facility in Gander, Newfoundland.
    Roosevelt received a captain's commission in the United States Army Air Corps on 23 September 1940, his 30th birthday.
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  • 1935
    Age 24
    After controversial involvement in the Air Mail Scandal and a secret attempt to sell bombers in civilian disguise to the USSR, he was hired as vice president of the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce (see Aerospace Industries Association), a post he held until 1935.
    More Details Hide Details That year he moved to Fort Worth, Texas, and became involved in broadcasting and farming. His eyesight (see Heterochromia iridum) did not permit him to hold a pilot's license.
  • 1933
    Age 22
    Roosevelt had always been interested in flight, and in 1933 he briefly served as general manager of Gilpin Airlines of Glendale, California, a small airline owned by Rep.
    More Details Hide Details Isabella Greenway (D-AZ), a close friend of the family. Later that year he became aviation editor for the William Randolph Hearst papers.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1910
    Born
    Born on September 23, 1910.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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