Emile Habibi
Arab writer
Emile Habibi
Imil Shukri Habibi was an Israeli-Palestinian writer of Arabic expression and a communist politician, son of a Christian family. In 2005, he was voted the 143rd-greatest Israeli of all time, in a poll by the Israeli news website Ynet to determine whom the general public considered the 200 Greatest Israelis.
Biography
Emile Habibi's personal information overview.
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News
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Spring is so short in Israel - Ha'aretz
Google News - over 5 years
Emile Habibi often used the term, al-farj al-arabi, which freely translated means "the Arab life preserver." When the leaders of Israel were forced into a corner, we would say: "God save us from the Arab life preserver," lest an
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Between worlds - Ahram Online
Google News - almost 6 years
... text are astonishing, and, rooted in the classical Arabic tradition of the literature of the criminal underworld and the maqamat, the book shares characteristics with the work of modern Arab writers like Emile Habibi and Yehia El-Taher Abdalla
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Vivante et libre, la poésie féminine arabe - Lesoir-echos.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Quant à Siham Daoud, poétesse née en 1953 et qui fonda avec le grand romancier Emile Habibi la revue Masharef (Alentours), elle écrit Jaffa, la pluie occupée et aussi : «Je n'attendais pas le coq/ Alors qu'on pend le jour derrière mes murailles»
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Independence Day and the 'Nakba Law' - Jerusalem Post
Google News - almost 6 years
I want you to know who Emile Habibi and Tawfik Toubi are, just like I know who David Ben-Gurion and Moshe Sharett are. If we are to share a brighter future, we must learn about the aliyas to the Holy Land, but also about the exodus of Palestinians
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The Arabic Novel: A New Form of Criticism Required? - MidEastPosts (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
He dips a toe into Emile Habibi's The Pessoptimist, which he says draws on Quranic and other traditions, and another toe into Gamal al-Ghitani's Zayni Barakat. But he doesn't explore further. He doesn't even follow up on the differences between riwaya
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Shekels as tools of the regime - Ha'aretz
Google News - almost 6 years
The issuance of new bills with pictures of writers is a chance for the government to show its concern for Arab citizens - writer Emile Habibi for instance. By Salman Masalha Let's talk about money and power. More precisely, the subject is the set of
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Palestinian Lives
NYTimes - about 11 years
GATE OF THE SUN By Elias Khoury. Translated by Humphrey Davies. 539 pp. Archipelago Books. $26. TO Americans, the novel in Arabic remains on the margins. Nonfiction devoted to the Arab world may be in demand, but interest in Arab literature, even after Naguib Mahfouz's Nobel Prize in 1988, hasn't moved too far past Aladdin and Sinbad. Elias Khoury
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NYTimes article
Correction
NYTimes - over 14 years
The Close Reader column on July 14, about the relation between daily life and intellectual life in Israel at present, referred erroneously to protests against the award of the Israel Prize to an Israeli Arab, Emile Habibi. The award, and the protests, occurred in 1992, not ''recently''; the Israel Prize is given for a life of achievement, not any
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THE CLOSE READER
NYTimes - over 14 years
Ben Yehuda Street in Jerusalem, where the American students used to stand around Sbarro's pizza, chatting each other up, is all but deserted these days. The tourists who regularly thronged the tiny shops where you can buy souvenirs like khaki T-shirts with the insignia of the Israeli Army have fled to more peaceful destinations. The few people
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Ramallah Journal;Suitcase No Longer His Homeland, a Poet Returns
NYTimes - almost 21 years
Staying in a modest hotel room here this week, Mahmoud Darwish seemed no more than a traveler passing through town. But after 26 years in exile, the man Palestinians consider their national poet felt he was coming home. Over several days, Mr. Darwish, a 54-year-old Israeli Arab, had returned to his native Galilee, visited the West Bank and seen
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NYTimes article
Emile Habibi, 73, Chronicler Of Conflicts of Israeli Arabs
NYTimes - almost 21 years
Emile Habibi, an Israeli Arab writer whose depiction of the predicament of Arabs in the Jewish state made him one of the most prominent and popular authors in the Middle East, died today in a hospital in Nazareth. He was 73. The cause was cancer, his family said. Widely read throughout the Arab world and translated into more than a dozen languages,
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Arabs Split on Cultural Ties to Israel
NYTimes - almost 22 years
The Arab world's most famous poet has been expelled from the Arab Writers' Union for meeting with Israeli intellectuals, and the punishment has generated bitter debate among writers and artists across the Middle East. At issue is the whole idea of cultural exchange with Israel, but underlying it is a long-simmering rebellion against pressures Arab
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NYTimes article
Israel and Settlers Must Practice Understanding; Cold-Blooded Killer
NYTimes - almost 23 years
To the Editor: "The tyrant dies and his rule is over; the martyr dies and his rule begins." Soren Kierkegaard's words have never been more applicable than in the wake of Baruch Goldstein's antihuman, anti-Jewish act of barbarism in Hebron. Condemnation of the massacre was swift and thoroughgoing. Yet Dr. Goldstein's horrific deed has been magnified
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NEWS SUMMARY
NYTimes - almost 23 years
International 2-9 AUTO THEFT PLAGUES BRITAIN With drivers in England and Wales almost twice as likely as those in the United States to become victims of car theft, antitheft technology has become a kind of national obsession in Britain as people try to stay one step ahead of the thieves. A1 RUSSIA'S POLLUTED NORTH Once a place of unparalleled
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MIDEAST ACCORD: Arabs and Jews; Reflections on Accord: New Hopes, Old Fears
NYTimes - over 23 years
An Athlete's Widow Ankie Rekhess-Spitzer is the widow of Andrei Spitzer, one of 11 Israeli athletes killed at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich by gunmen of the Black September group in the Palestine Liberation Organization. On Sunday, a day before the signing of the Israeli-Palestinian peace accords, she joined relatives of other victims at a
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Jerusalem Journal; To a Novelist of Nazareth, Laurels and Loud Boos
NYTimes - almost 25 years
When Israel marks its independence day on Thursday, it will award its highest literary honor for the first time to an Israeli Arab writer, an act of cultural recognition that has set off fierce debate in Arab intellectual circles. The dispute centers on whether the writer, Emile Habibi, a 70-year-old novelist from Nazareth and chronicler of the
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NYTimes article
Palestinian Perversion of the Holocaust
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: Peace is a form of reason. Peace is a form of reason. In the Middle East, however, reason is a reed. It is bested, on a regular basis, by memory, desire and dream. The minds and the hearts of Israelis and Palestinians are cluttered by sacred histories, by traditions of pain, by superstitions about the other, that feel more precious than
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NYTimes article
ALL ABOARD THE FLYING CARPET
NYTimes - almost 31 years
ARAB FOLKTALES Edited and translated by Inea Bushnaq. Illustrated. 386 pp. New York: Pantheon Books. $19.95. THE introduction to ''Arab Folktales,'' an anthology of 130 stories collected and translated by Inea Bushnaq, begins with a comparison of the arts of embroidery and storytelling in the Arab world. The elaborate stitching that traditionally
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Emile Habibi
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1996
    Age 74
    He died in 1996 in Nazareth and was buried according to his request in Haifa.
    More Details Hide Details His gravestone reads (at Habibi's own request): "Emile Habibi – Remained in Haifa."
  • 1992
    Age 70
    In 1992, he received the Israel Prize for Arabic literature.
    More Details Hide Details His willingness to accept both reflected his belief in coexistence, though his acceptance of the Israel Prize set off a debate among the Arabic intellectual community. Habibi was accused of legitimizing what they considered Israel's "anti-Arab" policy. Habibi replied to the accusations: "A dialogue of prizes is better than a dialogue of stones and bullets," he said. "It is indirect recognition of the Arabs in Israel as a nation. This is recognition of a national culture. It will help the Arab population in its struggle to strike roots in the land and win equal rights". 1969: Sudāsiyyat al-ayyām al-sittah 1974: Al-Waqāʾiʿ al-gharībah fī 'khtifāʾ Saʿīd Abī 'l-Naḥsh al-Mutashāʾil (translated as The Secret Life of Saeed the Pessoptimist) 1976: Kafr Qāsim (Kafr Kassem) 1980: Lakʿ bin Lakʿ (play) 1991: Khurāfiyyat Sarāyā Bint al-Ghūl (translated as Saraya, the Ogre's Daughter)
    His last novel, published in 1992, was Saraya, the Ogre's Daughter.
    More Details Hide Details In it he has a character state: "There is no difference between Christian and Muslim: we are all Palestinian in our predicament" In 1990, Habibi received the Al-Quds Prize from the PLO.
  • FORTIES
  • 1972
    Age 50
    In 1972 he resigned from the Knesset in order to write his first novel: The Secret Life of Saeed the Pessoptimist, which became a classic in modern Arabic literature.
    More Details Hide Details The book depicts the life of an Palestinian, employing black humour and satire. It was based on the traditional anti-hero Said in Arab literature. In a playful way it deals with how it is for Arabs to live in the state of Israel, and how one who has nothing to do with politics is drawn in to it. He followed this by other books, short stories and a play.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1954
    Age 32
    Habibi began writing short stories in the 1950s, and his first story, "The Mandelbaum Gate" was published in 1954.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1951
    Age 29
    He served in the Knesset between 1951 and 1959, and again from 1961 until 1972, first as a member of Maki, before breaking away from the party with Tawfik Toubi and Meir Vilner to found Rakah.
    More Details Hide Details In 1991, after a conflict about how the party should deal with the new policies of Mikhail Gorbachev, he left the party.
  • 1947
    Age 25
    Habibi was one of the leaders of the Palestine Communist Party during the Mandate era. He supported the 1947 UN Partition Plan.
    More Details Hide Details When Israel became a state he helped form the Israeli Communist Party (Maki).
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1922
    Age 0
    Born in 1922.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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