Eric Lindros
retired professional ice hockey player who played 13 seasons in the National Hockey League
Eric Lindros
Eric Bryan Lindros is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey player. Lindros played junior hockey in the OHL for the Oshawa Generals prior to being selected first overall in the 1991 NHL Entry Draft by the Quebec Nordiques. Lindros refused to play for the Nordiques and was eventually traded to the Philadelphia Flyers in June 1992 for a package of players and draft picks including Peter Forsberg. During his OHL career, Lindros led the Generals to a Memorial Cup victory in 1990.
Biography
Eric Lindros's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Eric Lindros from around the web
Eric Lindros Is Entering the Hall of Fame. His Legacy Isn’t Just Hockey.
NYTimes - 3 months
In 13 seasons on the ice, Lindros was talented, controversial and often injured. Since then, he has become a symbol for concussion awareness.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Ice hockey: Lindros, Makarov headline Hall of Fame Class of 2016
Reuters.com - 8 months
(Reuters) - Canadian Eric Lindros, whose impressive National Hockey League career was cut short by injuries, and Russian standout Sergei Makarov were elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame on Monday as part of the Class of 2016.
Article Link:
Reuters.com article
Connor McDavid and Jack Eichel Heralded as N.H.L.’s Next Stars
NYTimes - over 1 year
The two 18-year-old centers have received the type of acclaim that greeted Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux, Eric Lindros and Sidney Crosby.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Hecklers, Hooligans and the Striped-Shirted Maitre D
Huffington Post Sports - over 2 years
As is the case with any human relationship, there are some players and coaches that officials get along with better than others. Likewise, these relationships can change for the better or for the worse over time. As a referee, I generally enjoyed dealing with the players and, to a lesser extent, the coaches. Honestly, I often got my biggest kick out of dealing with hockey fans. As a matter of fact, I have developed some of my closest friendships with hockey fans who heckled me. One time I was in Toronto and there was a man in the stands behind the bench sitting with a stunningly beautiful woman next to him. Throughout the game, he kept up with a running series of heckles aimed at me. Finally, before the start of the third period, I went over to the glass. "Hey, lady," I said, gesturing to the man with her. "Is THAT the only way you can get to a Leafs game? You know, I could get you better seats." Everyone around them laughed. The guy simmered down. After the game, h ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post Sports article
Happy Father's Day
Broad St Hockey - over 3 years
There's something about being a dad that can make even a Penguin likable. Father's Day is pretty special. I've probably written something similar here on previous Father's Days, but I think it bears repeating: For most of us, our dads are the reason we are who we are, and in my case, that means sitting here on a plane, on my way to a hockey game, writing this on a hockey website. I love hockey because of my dad, and hockey is the biggest non-human thing in my life because of his influence. I vaguely remember my first game with my dad, sometime in the early 90s at the Spectrum. But it's hard to forget the hundreds that followed. There was the time when the Hartford Whalers won in overtime and sitting on the couch with dad, I wondered why they were so damn happy. Turns out they had completed a pretty ridiculous comeback. There was a run to the Finals in 1997, during which I excitedly pointed out to all of my friends on a school field trip to Center City the big Flyer ...
Article Link:
Broad St Hockey article
Hart Trophy Winners¢
Fox News - over 3 years
Winners of the National Hockey League's Hart Trophy, awarded annually to the player most valuable to his team: 2013 — Alex Ovechkin, Washington 2012 — Evgeni Malkin, Pittsburgh 2011 — Corey Perry, Anaheim 2010 — Henrik Sedin, Vancouver 2009 — Alexander Ovechkin, Washington 2008 — Alexander Ovechkin, Washington 2007 — Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh 2006 — Joe Thornton, San Jose 2005 — Lockout 2004 — Martin St. Louis, Tampa Bay 2003 — Peter Forsberg, Colorado 2002 — Jose Theodore, Montreal 2001 — Joe Sakic, Colorado 2000 — Chris Pronger, St. Louis 1999 — Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh 1998 — Dominik Hasek, Buffalo 1997 — Dominik Hasek, Buffalo 1996 — Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh 1995 — Eric Lindros, Philadelphia 1994 — Sergei Fedorov, Detroit 1993 — Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh 1992 — Mark Messier, N.Y.
Article Link:
Fox News article
An interview with Philadelphia Flyers trainer Jim McCrossin
Broad St Hockey - over 4 years
Jeff Angus is the managing editor of DobberHockey and a contributor to various other hockey websites. He has worked in the fitness industry, and over the next few months he is going to be profiling the strength and conditioning departments of all 30 NHL clubs. We're happy to share his piece on Flyers' trainer Jim McCrossin. Jim McCrossin has been with the Philadelphia Flyers organization for over a decade, and a member of the organization for almost two. He's the team's Athletic Trainer and Strength and Conditioning Coach. He is a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC) and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS), as well as a member of the National Athletic Trainers Association, the National Strength and Conditioning Association, and the American Academy of Sports Medicine. Simply put, he knows his stuff. McCrossin has seen his fair share of injuries during his time with the Flyers. He has worked extensively with players who have suffered concussions, from Eri ...
Article Link:
Broad St Hockey article
Thursday Morning Fly By: Sports Other Than Hockey Were Interesting Yesterday
Broad St Hockey - over 4 years
Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers-related news and notes... Travis posted it at 4:40 yesterday afternoon and nobody commented as of publishing, so go look at player scoring chance results on the penalty kill: [BSH] Taking inventory of the Flyers' forwards: [Flyers Faithful] Podcast with Scott Hartnell: [Backhand Shelf] Jan Hlavac - forever to be known as the guy traded for Eric Lindros - is playing in Kladno: [NHL.com] An option Flyers fans would surely support, but is trading cap space a good idea for the NHL? [Puck Daddy] [Backhand Shelf] Ryan Lambert calls Donald Fehr a negotiating genius: [Backhand Shelf] Today's jerseys presented as SNES 8-bit images: [Backhand Shelf]
Article Link:
Broad St Hockey article
Monday Morning Fly By: Welcome Back, Anthony SanFilippo
Broad St Hockey - over 4 years
Today's open discussion thread, complete with your daily dose of Philadelphia Flyers-related news and notes... Anthony SanFilippo is now writing for the Flyers' official web site, and he opens with a story on undrafted free agent Andrew Johnston: [Philadelphia Flyers] Second round pick Anthony Stolarz was pleased with his prospect camp: [CSNPhilly] Brandon Manning had a different approach this year as a result of his time in the NHL: [Daily News] Eric Lindros helped out Dominic Moore raise money for concussion awareness: [CSNPhilly] Looking at just how much impact goons have: [Backhand Shelf] Statistics are all about asking the correct questions - "It's valuable to know how a guy gets around the ice just as long as that doesn't obscure where he's going, if you catch my drift." [NHLNumbers.com]
Article Link:
Broad St Hockey article
16 reasons why the 2011-12 Philadelphia Flyers season was great
Broad St Hockey - almost 5 years
Yet again, the Philadelphia Flyers season has come to an unfortunate end. It's 37 years and counting since our last parade down Broad Street, but that doesn't mean this year was a complete failure. It was a ridiculously entertaining season full of old memories, new memories, hope for the future and appreciation for the past. Some seasons come and go with little fanfare. This one? Not even close. Let's think back on 16 reasons, in no particular order, why this Flyers season was one we'll remember for a long, long time. 1. We watched Claude Giroux emerge into a superstar before our eyes. Peter Laviolette calls him the Best Player In The World, and while that may be up for debate, there's not in single doubt in anybody's mind that he's in the conversation. He was in the running for the scoring title all season, and I'm convinced he'll have at least one of those under his belt in the next few seasons. Oh, and he's only 24 years old. 2. For all his faults, Ilya Bryzgalov i ...
Article Link:
Broad St Hockey article
Flyers announcer Chris Therien really doesn't like Sidney Crosby
Awful Announcing - almost 5 years
Sunday's violent Flyers-Penguins Stanley Cup playoff game resulted in a lot of vicious reactions from all across the internet, with Penguins fans throwing racist insults towards Wayne Simmonds of the Flyers, Flyers fans complaining about the Penguins being dirty whiners, and the mainstream media freaking out about every Sidney Crosby stereotype coming true in one series. Former Flyers player Chris Therien, now one of the team's radio announcers, had some none too pleasant things to say about Crosby. Crossing Broad has both the audio and the transcript. "You know what, Crosby is the one who started that thing. What is to say someone can't just punch his lights right out? Concussion or no concussion. Punch him in the face as hard as you can. He went after Timonen, so you drop a bomb right at his beak, and you let him know, "I don't care about your head, kid, if you're going to pull this stuff in our house." He's going to whine all night and cry all night for penalties, yet he go ...
Article Link:
Awful Announcing article
Flyers Vs. Penguins: Eastern Conference Quarterfinals Preview And Predictions
SB Nation Philly - almost 5 years
The Philadelphia Flyers (47-26-9, 103 points, fifth in Eastern Conference) travel west to take on their Atlantic Divisions arch-rivals, the Pittsburgh Penguins (51-25-6, 108 points, fourth in East), in the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals, which begin Wednesday night at the CONSOL Energy Center. Eastern Conference Quarterfinals Schedule Game 1 Wednesday, April 11th at Pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. Game 2 Friday, April 13th at Pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. Game 3 Sunday, April 15th at Philadelphia 3:00 p.m. Game 4 Wednesday, April 18th at Philadelphia 7:30 p.m. Game 5* Friday, April 20th at Pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. Game 6* Sunday, April 22nd at Philadelphia TBD Game 7* Tuesday, April 24th at Pittsburgh TBD * - If necessary Flyers-Penguins Playoff History Even though this is the 44th season for both clubs, there have only been five previous postseason meetings between these two organizations. The Pens were a laughing stock for most of their first nearly-20 years in the NHL, un ...
Article Link:
SB Nation Philly article
Redskins Overpaid, But Others May Wish They Did…
Fan 590 - almost 5 years
I was already thinking of the trials and tribulations of “overpaying” for a superstar a month ago when it leaked out that the Columbus Blue Jackets were attempting to trade star winger Rick Nash.  It’s never easy NOT to overpay.  I mean, how do you “underpay”?  Borderline impossible, isn’t it.  Look at the Eric Lindros deal in the summer of 1992 — not many thought the Flyers had overpaid at the time (Lindros went for: cash, a R1 pick in 1992, a R1 pick in 1993, Chris Simon, Steve Duchense, Ron Hextall, Kerry Huffman, Mike Ricci, and Peter Forsberg).  But think about it now?  It’s INSANE.  But it only became so because Forsberg became Forsberg — if anything Ricci was still meant to be the best player in the deal, and drafted in a Top 5 which included Keith Primeau, Jaromir Jagr, Owen Nolan, and Petr Nedved, his accomplishments don’t match up, in my eyes anyway, to any of those four.  But the Flyers were getting ERIC LINDROS!  It seemed like an easy call to make, but Lindros would only ...
Article Link:
Fan 590 article
Philly fans give Lindros warm welcome
The Daily Gleaner - about 5 years
Eric Lindros stepped out of the dugout to a roar he hadn't heard in Philadelphia in almost 12 years.
Article Link:
The Daily Gleaner article
Eric Lindros basks in fans' applause during Flyers-Rangers Alumni Classic
Penn Live - about 5 years
The superstar who left Philadelphia on bad terms is embraced by a sellout crowd at Citizens Bank Park
Article Link:
Penn Live article
Eric Lindros talks about Winter Classic
philly.com - about 5 years
<a class="fplink fp-79242" href="/eric+lindros">Eric Lindros</a> speaks to the media before the alumni game at the Winter Classic on Dec. 30.
Article Link:
philly.com article
'There's No Such Thing As a Minor Concussion,' UB Doctor Says
University of Buffalo - about 5 years
Dr. John J. Leddy Associate Professor of Clinical Orthopaedics and Director of the UB Concussion Management Clinic University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences leddy@buffalo.edu With the NFL and NHL seasons well under way, Leddy discusses the progress that doctors, teams and athletes have made in understanding concussions and recognizing the seriousness of the injuries. With colleague Barry Willer, Leddy has developed an exercise-based test that helps doctors understand when it’s safe for an athlete to return to play. Athletes treated at Leddy’s concussion management clinic include Toronto Maple Leafs center Tim Connolly, formerly of the Buffalo Sabres. On the need to take concussions seriously:   “There’s no such thing as a minor concussion, and the problem is that once you have one or two, you’re more likely to have a third, fourth o ...
Article Link:
University of Buffalo article
NHL Trade Rumours: Drew Doughty, Luke Schenn, and More - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
I also hope my friend is not right in that this could ruin his career like Eric Lindros (yes, he was amazing at one point). The Buffalo Sabres are looking to move salary. This time it is not because they don&#39;t have the money, this is because they need
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Eric Lindros
    FORTIES
  • 2016
    Age 42
    In June 2016, Lindros was announced as one of four appointees to the 2016 Hockey Hall of Fame induction class, joined by the late Pat Quinn, goaltender Rogie Vachon and Russian winger Sergei Makarov.
    More Details Hide Details Played for Canada in:
    On June 27, 2016, Lindros was one of four individuals named to the 2016 Hockey Hall of Fame class, to be inducted in November.
    More Details Hide Details The oldest son of Carl Lindros and Bonnie Roszell-Lindros, Eric has Swedish heritage. The name "Lindros" means "Rose of the Linden tree." His great-grandfather Axel immigrated to Canada from Bredaryd, a small village in Sweden, and Eric is the third generation of the Lindros family to be born in Canada. His father Carl Lindros received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Western Ontario (where he played football, well enough to be drafted 30th overall by the Canadian Football League's Edmonton Eskimos in the 1970 CFL College Draft), and became a chartered accountant. Lindros' mother Bonnie is a registered nurse. Lindros has one brother, Brett, and one sister, Robin. Lindros' younger brother Brett played for the New York Islanders and retired early on May 1, 1996, due to post-concussion syndrome. The book Fire on Ice, co-written by Randy Starkman and published in October 1991 by HarperCollins, chronicled the life and early hockey career of Lindros.
  • THIRTIES
  • 2011
    Age 37
    On December 31, 2011, he played in the 2012 NHL Winter Classic Alumni Game between the New York Rangers and the Philadelphia Flyers.
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  • 2010
    Age 36
    On May 9, 2010, Lindros, along with his mother Bonnie, supermodel/actress Monika Schnarre and a few other Canadian notables, helped Habitat for Humanity Toronto by recognizing Mother's Day by building homes.
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  • 2009
    Age 35
    Lindros cut ties with the NHLPA, however, on February 3, 2009, resigning as ombudsman after 15 months on the job.
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  • 2007
    Age 33
    On November 11, 2007, three days after his retirement, the National Hockey League Players' Association (NHLPA) appointed Lindros to the newly created position of NHLPA ombudsman.
    More Details Hide Details Lindros had been involved with the organization throughout his career.
    On the day of his retirement, November 8, 2007, it was also announced that Lindros had donated $5 million to the London Health Sciences Centre.
    More Details Hide Details This donation supports programs such as the Fowler Kennedy Sport Medicine Clinic, and is one of the largest personal donations by a Canadian sports figure.
    Lindros officially announced his retirement on November 8, 2007, in London at the age of 34.
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    He would play in 49 regular season games collecting 26 points, and three games in the 2007 playoffs.
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  • 2006
    Age 32
    Lindros signed a one-year contract for the 2006–07 season with Dallas on July 17, 2006.
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    After a 27-game absence, Lindros returned to the Toronto lineup on February 28, 2006, his 33rd birthday, against the Washington Capitals.
    More Details Hide Details His return was brief, however, as he re-injured his wrist while taking a slapshot in a game against the Ottawa Senators on March 4, effectively ending his season. He had surgery on the wrist at the Hand and Upper Limb Centre in London, Ontario, two days after the game.
  • 2005
    Age 31
    After a steady start to his tenure with Toronto in which he recorded 22 points in 32 games, Lindros suffered a tear of a ligament in his left wrist against the Dallas Stars on December 10, 2005.
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    On August 11, 2005, after the NHL labour dispute had cancelled the 2004–05 season, Lindros signed a one-year, $1.55 million contract with the Maple Leafs for the 2005–06 season.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 2003
    Age 29
    In 2003–04, Lindros' eighth concussion limited him to just 39 games, though he did collect 32 points.
    More Details Hide Details He again became an unrestricted free agent after the season.
  • 2002
    Age 28
    Though 2002–03 was the first injury-free season of his career, he struggled to match his previous season, scoring just 53 points in 81 games.
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  • 2001
    Age 27
    In 2001–02, Lindros averaged a little over a point a game with 37 goals and 36 assists for 73 points in 72 games.
    More Details Hide Details His impressive start also led to his seventh and final All-Star selection, but due to an injury he was unable to participate and was replaced by teammate Mike York.
    Bobby Clarke eventually traded Lindros to the New York Rangers on August 20, 2001, in exchange for Jan Hlaváč, Kim Johnsson, Pavel Brendl and a 2003 third-round draft choice (Štefan Ružička).
    More Details Hide Details The Rangers would also receive a 2003 first-round draft pick if Lindros were to suffer a concussion in the pre-season or the first 50 games of the regular season, and did not return to action for at least 12 months.
  • 2000
    Age 26
    After Lindros was cleared to play in December, the Flyers refused to deal his rights to the Toronto Maple Leafs, as he preferred, and Lindros sat out the entire 2000–01 season.
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  • 1999
    Age 25
    The 1999–2000 season would be Lindros' last as a Flyer.
    More Details Hide Details Having suffered his second concussion of the season (fourth overall) in March, Lindros criticized the team's trainers for failing to diagnose a concussion as he played with symptoms following a hit he suffered in a game against the Boston Bruins two weeks prior. Clarke then stripped Lindros of the captaincy for his actions. Lindros sat out the remainder of the regular season and suffered another concussion while rehabilitating for a return to the lineup. Lindros ultimately returned for Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals against the New Jersey Devils; he scored the lone goal in a 2–1 Flyers loss, and in Game 7, suffered yet another concussion after a hit by Devils defenceman Scott Stevens. The Flyers lost Game 7, 2–1 and the series despite leading three games to one, and Lindros became a restricted free agent during the off-season. He refused to accept a two-way qualifying offer with a minor league provision from the Flyers, who still owned his rights.
    During an April 1, 1999, game against the Nashville Predators, Lindros suffered what was diagnosed as a rib injury.
    More Details Hide Details Later that night, the teammate he was sharing a hotel room with, Keith Jones, discovered Lindros lying in a tub, pale and cold. In a call to the Flyers, the trainer was told to put Lindros on a plane that was returning to Philadelphia with injured teammate Mark Recchi. But Jones insisted that Lindros be taken to a nearby hospital and it was discovered Lindros had a collapsed lung caused by internal bleeding of his chest wall. Lindros' father wrote the Flyers a letter in which he stated that if the trainer had followed team orders, Eric would be dead, a statement supported by the doctors who treated him in Nashville.
    Lindros would suffer a second concussion in January 1999 that sidelined him for two games.
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  • 1998
    Age 24
    Lindros' relationship with Flyers General Manager Bobby Clarke soon deteriorated. He and Clarke feuded in the media, with Clarke questioning his toughness; Lindros spent many games on the injured reserve and suffered a series of concussions, the first in 1998 from a hit delivered by Pittsburgh's Darius Kasparaitis that sidelined him for 18 games.
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    In 1998, Lindros, at just 25 years of age, was ranked number 54th on The Hockey News list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players of all time.
    More Details Hide Details The only player of comparable age was 37th-ranked Jaromír Jágr, who was 26 at the time.
  • 1997
    Age 23
    Lindros led the Flyers to the 1997 Stanley Cup Finals, handily defeating the Pittsburgh Penguins, Buffalo Sabres and the New York Rangers in five games apiece.
    More Details Hide Details In the Finals, however, the Flyers were swept in four games by the Detroit Red Wings; Lindros' only goal came with 14 seconds left in the third period of Game 4. As a franchise player, Lindros was expected to carry the team, but he had not lived up to expectations nor had he shown leadership during the Finals series. Detroit Head Coach Scotty Bowman used the fitness-oriented defence pairing of Nicklas Lidström and Larry Murphy against Lindros' Legion of Doom line instead of sending out—as everyone, including the Flyers, expected—Vladimir Konstantinov to engage in a physical confrontation.
  • 1995
    Age 21
    He scored over 40 goals in each of his first two seasons and won the Hart Memorial Trophy as MVP in the lockout-shortened season of 1995 after scoring 29 goals and 41 assists in 46 games and leading the Flyers to their first playoff appearance in six years.
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  • 1994
    Age 20
    In September 1994, Lindros succeeded Kevin Dineen as Flyers captain.
    More Details Hide Details Along with John LeClair and Mikael Renberg, he played on the dreaded "Legion of Doom" line.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1993
    Age 19
    Lindros has also represented Canada's senior team at the World Hockey Championships, leading the squad in scoring at the 1993 tournament.
    More Details Hide Details In Olympic play, Lindros represented Canada three times (1992, 1998 and 2002), winning a silver medal in 1992 and gold in 2002.
  • 1992
    Age 18
    At the 1992 NHL Entry Draft, the Nordiques worked out trades involving Lindros with both the Philadelphia Flyers and New York Rangers.
    More Details Hide Details The Flyers trade had the Nordiques receiving Steve Duchesne, Ron Hextall, Kerry Huffman, Mike Ricci, the rights to Peter Forsberg, the Flyers' first-round pick in 1992 (seventh overall) and 1993 and $15 million. The trade with the Rangers had the Nordiques receiving Tony Amonte, Alexei Kovalev, John Vanbiesbrouck, Doug Weight, three first-round picks (in 1993, 1994 and 1996) and $12 million. Additionally, if Vanbiesbrouck was declared an unrestricted free agent, James Patrick would have replaced him in the deal. The Flyers, believing they had consummated their deal with the Nordiques first, filed a complaint and the NHL announced an independent arbitrator would be appointed. On June 30, 1992, 11 days after the draft, arbitrator Larry Bertuzzi ruled in favor of the Flyers. Bertuzzi determined that the Flyers and Nordiques had agreed to a trade 80 minutes before the Rangers and Nordiques had reached their agreement. Since the Flyers used the 1992 pick to select Ryan Sittler and Quebec had no interest in Sittler, the Flyers and Nordiques had to agree on a substitution for the pick. On July 21, Bertuzzi ruled that Chris Simon and the Flyers' 1994 first-round pick would be added to the trade.
    While he awaited a trade, Lindros spent the time playing with the Generals and also participated in the 1992 Winter Olympics, winning a silver medal with Canada.
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  • 1991
    Age 17
    Lindros was selected first overall by the Quebec Nordiques in the 1991 NHL Entry Draft.
    More Details Hide Details Lindros had signaled in advance that he would never play for the Nordiques, citing the city's isolation, lack of marketing potential, and French character; the team selected him anyway. Nordiques President Marcel Aubut publicly announced that they would make Lindros the centrepiece of their franchise turnaround, and refused to trade Lindros, saying that he would not have a career in the NHL as long as he held out. Because of Lindros' popularity and hype, it is alleged that NHL President Gil Stein intervened to get the Nordiques to trade him, as it would otherwise damage the image of the League.
  • 1990
    Age 16
    During the 1990–91 season, Lindros won the Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy as top scorer, the Red Tilson Trophy as MVP, the CHL Player of the Year award and the CHL Top Draft Prospect Award.
    More Details Hide Details The Generals returned to the Robertson Cup finals, facing Sault Ste. Marie. The series was one of the more dramatic in OHL history given Lindros's attitude toward the team, with fans from the Soo loudly jeering him every time he touched the puck. The Greyhounds upset the heavily-favoured defending champions in a six-game series, winning the last game on home ice. On March 6, 2008, the Generals retired his jersey number 88, the second number to be retired by the franchise, and it was declared Eric Lindros Day in Oshawa.
    Lindros helped lead the Generals to the 1990 J.
    More Details Hide Details Ross Robertson Cup, and a 1990 Memorial Cup victory.
    He played parts of three seasons for the Generals from 1990 to 1992.
    More Details Hide Details During that time, he scored 180 goals, 200 assists, 380 points and had 437 penalty minutes in 157 games played.
    Internationally, Lindros represented Canada at the World Junior Championships three times (1990, 1991 and 1992), winning gold medals in 1990 and 1991.
    More Details Hide Details He is Canada's all-time points leader at the World Junior Championships with 31 points, five points ahead of Jordan Eberle and Brayden Schenn.
    During his OHL career, Lindros led the Generals to a Memorial Cup victory in 1990.
    More Details Hide Details Prior to being drafted in 1991, Lindros captured the Red Tilson Trophy as the Most Outstanding Player in the OHL, and also was named the CHL Player of the Year. Lindros was born in London, Ontario, but grew up in Toronto. Lindros began his National Hockey League (NHL) career with the Flyers during the 1992–93 season. He was an exemplary power forward, and averaged more than a point per game. His hard-nosed style caused him to miss significant time with injuries, and he had many problems with concussions. Lindros captured the Hart Memorial Trophy and Lester B. Pearson Award after the lockout-shortened 1994–95 season. In August 2001, Lindros joined the New York Rangers via trade. He then signed with the Toronto Maple Leafs for the 2005–06 season before finishing his career in 2006–07 with the Dallas Stars.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1973
    Born
    Born on February 28, 1973.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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