Estelle Taylor
Actor
Estelle Taylor
Estelle Taylor was an American Hollywood actress whose career was most prominent during the silent film era of the 1920s. Born Ida Estelle Taylor in Wilmington, Delaware, the daughter of Harry D Taylor and Ida LaBertha (Barrett) Taylor, Estelle married three times. Her first husband was banker Kenneth Malcolm Peacock, her second was William Harrison "Jack" Dempsey, the world heavyweight boxing champion, and her third, theatrical producer Paul Smith.
Biography
Estelle Taylor's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Estelle Taylor
News
News abour Estelle Taylor from around the web
Merritt: Looking for grandparents' lives in pages of an old diary - Daily News Transcript
Google News - over 5 years
"I forgot to duck" was the great Dempsey quote to his movie star wife, Estelle Taylor, following his surprise defeat, on points, by Tunney, a former marine. Rudolph Valentino, star of many films Gramp and Grammie must have watched at the St. George and
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Google News article
Elles ont toutes été Lucrèce Borgia au cinéma - Tribune de Genève
Google News - over 5 years
Estelle Taylor l'incarne dans «Don Giovanni et Lucrezia Borgia» d'Alan Crossland (si si!) en 1926. Sautons pour arriver au parlant. En 1935, Edwige Feuillère devient la Lucrèce d'Abel Gance. Le film est un peu fauché, mais le bain, révélant les seins
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Google News article
Lon Chaney Movie Schedule: THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, TELL IT TO THE MARINES ... - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Lon Chaney, Lupe Velez, Estelle Taylor. BW-67 mins. 5:00 AM LONDON AFTER MIDNIGHT (1927) In this silent film, vampires are suspected in an unsolved murder. Dir: Tod Browning. Cast: Lon Chaney, Marceline Day, Henry B. Walthall. BW-47 mins
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Google News article
Ronald Colman Movie Schedule: LOST HORIZON, HER NIGHT OF ROMANCE, RAFFLES - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Fay Wray, Estelle Taylor, Warren Hymer. BW-75 mins. 4:15 PM ARROWSMITH (1931) A crusading doctor fights his way through tragedy to find his true calling. Dir: John Ford. Cast: Ronald Colman, Helen Hayes, Richard Bennett. BW-99 mins
Article Link:
Google News article
Con la giornata del bacio, ecco i record più pazzi - TicinOnline.ch
Google News - over 5 years
Il maggior numero di baci nel corso di un film sono stati dati nel 1927 da John Barrymore in „Don Juan“, che ha baciato le sue due partner cinematografiche Estelle Taylor e Mary Astor niente di meno che 127 volte. Nella storia del cinema,
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Google News article
This was Brainerd - May 30 - Brainerd Daily Dispatch
Google News - over 5 years
Starring Richard Dix, Estelle Taylor and Irene Dunne, at the Palace Theatre. Incensed at the bartender of the Iron Exchange buffet, who refused to serve him a drink at half past ten Monday night, a former shoemaker - now working at the railroad - slung
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Google News article
DVDS; Strong, Silent Types (One Very Silent)
NYTimes - over 7 years
'CIRCLE OF IRON' Last month in Bangkok, David Carradine died the lonely death of a businessman on the road. His business -- that of the industrious, itinerant movie star -- had taken him to Thailand to appear in ''Stretch,'' yet another of the modestly budgeted international productions that had come to dominate his career. One of the Willy Lomans
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NYTimes article
When Music Met the Red Carpet
NYTimes - about 8 years
From far left, Estelle, Taylor Swift, M.I.A. and Jason Mraz were among the nominees making a showing on the red carpet at the 51st annual Grammy Awards. More photos of the fashions: nytimes.com/music.
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NYTimes article
Dempsey-Tunney: A Daughter's View
NYTimes - over 14 years
To the Sports Editor: With interest I read Jack Cavanaugh's article ''The Long Count Is a Long Memory'' (Sept. 22) and feel that some facts regarding Jack Dempsey should be corrected. I lived with this great man my entire life, moving out only when I attended college. When I reached a responsible age and achieved some talent as a writer, he
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NYTimes article
BackTalk; The Long Count Is a Long Memory
NYTimes - over 14 years
Seventy-five years later, Budd Schulberg still vividly remembers the emotions that engulfed him in less than half a minute's time while he sat in front of a ''big, fancy'' floor-model radio at his parents' Hollywood home. Schulberg, who wrote the boxing novel ''The Harder They Fall,'' and his father, B. T. Schulberg, a well-known movie executive
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NYTimes article
The View From/New Haven; A Filmmaker Unearths Stories of the Struggle for Civil Rights
NYTimes - over 16 years
KARYL K. EVANS, an independent filmmaker, specializes in bringing little-known histories to life. In 1995, she produced and directed a documentary on the Amistad revolt, two years before the Hollywood version was released and well before ''Amistad'' was a household word. Her latest effort is called ''African Americans in Connecticut: Civil War to
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NYTimes article
MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - almost 21 years
SOME classics and near-classics of the 1930's and a later inside-Hollywood fable stand out on the week's movie menu. None - hooray! - are overshow, at least yet. King Vidor's 1931 STREET SCENE creaks a bit as an early, stagy talkie, till the explosive climax. It's a powerful slice of New York tenement life via Elmer Rice's hit drama, with fine cast
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NYTimes article
Harvey T. Boyd; Illustrator, 52
NYTimes - almost 23 years
Harvey T. Boyd, a fashion illustrator, art teacher and painter, died on March 19 at the Cabrini Medical Center in Manhattan. He was 52. The cause was complications from abdominal cancer, his family said. Mr. Boyd taught for 26 years at the Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan, where he was an associate professor of art. He was born in
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NYTimes article
SPORTS OF THE TIMES; Mike Tyson's Toughest Opponent
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: FOR a world heavyweight champion, winning the title is always the easy part. It's the money and the fame that create problems. Mike Tyson has unified the world heavyweight title. Now he's trying to unify his life. FOR a world heavyweight champion, winning the title is always the easy part. It's the money and the fame that create problems.
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NYTimes article
TV: 'DEMPSEY,' TALE OF FIGHT YEARS
NYTimes - over 33 years
THIS month's fight picture is ''Dempsey.'' Beginning at 8 tonight, it is being given three hours on CBS when two would have done nicely. Based on a book written in 1977 by Jack Dempsey with his stepdaughter, Barbara Piatelli Dempsey (he also wrote an autobiography, ''Round by Round,'' in 1940 with M. M. Stearns), Edward DiLorenzo's script manages
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NYTimes article
TELEVISION WEEK; Producing for Kids
NYTimes - over 33 years
One of NBC's major programs aimed at children in the 8-to-12 year old range is titled ''Special Treat.'' The latest ''Special Treat,'' which was produced by the local station WMAQ-TV in Chicago, is called ''Kidstown U.S.A.'' It consists of three segments: A re-creation of explorer Robert Cavelier LaSalle's 1681 canoe trip down the Mississippi River
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Estelle Taylor
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1958
    Age 63
    She died in 1958, after a battle with cancer.
    More Details Hide Details She was interred at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Estelle Taylor was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1620 Vine Street in Hollywood, California. In the 1983 American television biopic Dempsey, Estelle Taylor was portrayed by British actress Victoria Tennant.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1953
    Age 58
    In her later years, Taylor devoted her free time to her pets and was the president and founder of the California Pet Owners' Protective League. In 1953, Taylor served on the City Animal Regulation Commission in Los Angeles, California.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1931
    Age 36
    Her marriage to Dempsey ended in divorce in 1931.
    More Details Hide Details Her third husband was a theatrical producer, Paul Smith. Of her last husband and their marriage, she said: "We have been friends and Paul has managed my stage career for five years, so it seemed logical that marriage should work out for us, but I'm afraid I'll have to say that the reason it has not worked out is incompatibility." She had no children.
  • 1928
    Age 33
    In 1928, she and husband Dempsey starred in a Broadway play titled The Big Fight, loosely based around Dempsey's boxing popularity, which ran for 31 performances at the Majestic Theatre.
    More Details Hide Details Taylor made a successful transition to sound films or "talkies." Her first sound film was the comical sketch Pusher in the Face (1929). Notable sound films in which she appeared include Street Scene (1931), with Sylvia Sidney; the Academy Award for Best Picture-winning Cimarron (1931), with Richard Dix and Irene Dunne; and Call Her Savage (1932), with Clara Bow. Taylor's last film appearance was in Jean Renoir's The Southerner (1945).
  • 1926
    Age 31
    Despite being ill with arthritis, she won the supporting role of Mary, Queen of Scots in Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall (1924), starring Mary Pickford. "I've since wondered if my long illness did not, in some measure at least, make for realism in registering the suffering of the unhappy and tormented Scotch queen," she told a reporter in 1926.
    More Details Hide Details She played Lucretia Borgia in Don Juan (1926), Warner Bros. ' first feature-length film with synchronized Vitaphone sound effects and musical soundtrack. The film also starred John Barrymore, Mary Astor and Warner Oland. Variety praised her characterization of Lucretia: "The complete surprise is the performance of Estelle Taylor as Lucretia Borgia. Her Lucretia is a fine piece of work. She makes it sardonic in treatment, conveying precisely the woman Lucretia is presumed to have been." She was supposed to have co-starred in a film with Rudolph Valentino, but he died just before production was to begin. One of her last silent films was New York (1927), featuring Ricardo Cortez and Lois Wilson.
  • 1925
    Age 30
    She was finally divorced from Peacock in January 1925, before marrying her second husband "Jack" Dempsey, the world heavyweight boxing champion.
    More Details Hide Details They lived in Los Feliz in a Hollywood celebrity enclave called Laughlin Park.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1920
    Age 25
    She made her stage debut in the musical Come On, Charlie. After relocating to Hollywood, she began taking bit parts in films. One of Taylor's earliest successes was in 1920 in Fox's While New York Sleeps with Marc McDermott.
    More Details Hide Details She and McDermott play three sets of characters in different time periods. This film was lost for decades, but has been recently discovered and screened at a film festival in Los Angeles. She starred opposite John Gilbert in Monte Cristo (1922); the New York Herald critic wrote that "Miss Taylor was as effective in the revenge section of the film as she was in the first or love part of the screened play. Here is a class of face that can stand a close-up without becoming a mere speechless automaton." One of her most memorable roles is that of Miriam, the sister of Moses (portrayed by Theodore Roberts), in the biblical prologue of Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments (1923), one of the most successful films of the silent era. Her performance in the DeMille film was considered a great acting achievement.
  • 1919
    Age 24
    After her stage debut in 1919, Taylor began appearing in small roles in World and Vitagraph films.
    More Details Hide Details She achieved her first notable success with While New York Sleeps (1920), in which she played three different roles, including a "vamp." She was a contract player of Fox Film Corporation and, later, Paramount Pictures, but for the most part of her career she freelanced. She became famous and was commended by critics for her portrayals of historical women in important films: Miriam in The Ten Commandments (1923), Mary, Queen of Scots in Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall (1924), and Lucrezia Borgia in Don Juan (1926). Although she made a successful transition to sound films, she retired from film acting in 1932 and decided to focus entirely on her singing career.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1911
    Age 16
    Taylor married three times. Her first husband was banker Kenneth Malcolm Peacock, whom she married in 1911.
    More Details Hide Details She separated from him in order to pursue her acting career in New York.
    In 1911, she married bank cashier Kenneth M. Peacock.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1903
    Age 8
    Harry and Ida divorced in 1903, and Ida later married vaudevillian Harry J. Boylan.
    More Details Hide Details Estelle's sister, Helen Taylor (1898–1990), was cast in supporting roles in a few silent films of the 1920s. Taylor was raised by her maternal grandparents, Charles Christopher Barrett and Ida Lauber. Her childhood ambition was to become a stage actress. When she was ten years old she sang the role of "Buttercup" in an amateur performance of H.M.S. Pinafore in Wilmington. She attended high school and college in Wilmington.
  • 1894
    Born
    Born on May 20, 1894.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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