Estelle Winwood
stage, actress
Estelle Winwood
Estelle Winwood was an English stage and film actress who moved to the United States in mid-career and became celebrated for her longevity.
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Estelle Winwood's personal information overview.
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Santa Estelle - La Repubblica
Google News - over 5 years
O almeno cos' pensava Estelle Winwood, santa del giorno e attrice più longeva della storia del cinema. Estelle nacque a Londra nel 1883. A 5 anni capisce che vuole fare l'attrice. La madre è felice, il padre si dispera. Ovviamente, Estelle vince e
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Google News article
'THE PRODUCERS'; Strange Humor
NYTimes - almost 16 years
To the Editor: The Nazis nudniks? J. Hoberman's favorable assessment of Mel Brook's strange humor is appalling. I live in a Florida retirement community and am a moderator for a film course. I have for years refused to show ''The Producers'' because of 1) the embarrassing scenes of Zero Mostel and the aged Estelle Winwood and 2) the unfunny
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NYTimes article
FILM; When The Nazis Became Nudniks
NYTimes - almost 16 years
IT'S springtime for Hitler and Germany, winter for Poland and France,'' the uniformed tenor warbles. ''Come on, Germans -- go into your dance!'' His command is the cue for a stage full of goose-stepping chorines in storm trooper caps and lederhosen hot pants to take their places in a rotating swastika formation, filmed from an overhead angle like
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NYTimes article
THEATER REVIEW; What Becomes a Legend Most? Three Plays?
NYTimes - over 16 years
It must have seemed like a good idea. Why else would would theatergoers be faced this season with three plays about Tallulah Bankhead (1903-1968), the actress who comes attached to the adjective legendary? In the beginning was ''Tallulah Hallelujah!,'' with Tovah Feldshuh as the legend. Yet to come is ''Tallulah,'' a one-woman show with Kathleen
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NYTimes article
THEATER; Nothing Matters, Only Style and Words
NYTimes - over 17 years
ALL the ages of classical and modern drama are ever ripe for re-invention. Transport Electra to post-Civil War New England, Richard III to Nazi Germany and Antigone to the battle of the homeless in contemporary New York. A theatrical distillation of ideas and feelings crosses time and cultural differences. But the transplanting or updating of Oscar
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NYTimes article
TELEVISION REVIEW;Life After Drag: Unreality Endures
NYTimes - over 20 years
The world of the drag queen might look glamorous these days. Chic research projects have included Mike Nichols collecting information on the international club circuit for his film "The Birdcage" and Mick Jagger preparing for a transvestite role in his next film, which apparently needs an Estelle Winwood look-alike. But as tonight's "P.O.V."
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NYTimes article
Critic's Notebook; Where Legends Were Born, Ghosts of Glory Linger
NYTimes - almost 27 years
LEAD: The marquee at the Lyric Theater on West 42d Street often promises ''Two Horrifying Hits.'' But inside, once past the garish posters, the popcorn and video games, a theatergoer can look up at the wide arching ceiling and feel emanations of the performers who once played the Lyric and who helped to make 42d Street between Seventh and Eighth
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CRITICS' CHOICES; Broadcast TV
NYTimes - over 31 years
Movie buffs have a holiday weekend bonanza - no less than eight nostalgic treats of wide variety on Saturday night. At 8 P.M., Channel 5 offers a rare showing of ''The Green Pastures'' (1936), from Marc Connelly's long-running stage classic. This is a gently humorous fable - a simplistic depiction of Biblical stories and heaven, as told by a black
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BROADWAY
NYTimes - over 32 years
SHE'S been Rock Hudson's maid and Rhoda's mother and Rosie, the quicker picker-upper, and next spring, after an absence of almost 25 years, her address is once again going to be ''Nancy Walker-Broadway.'' Miss Walker, who starred in the original productions of ''Best Foot Forward'' and ''Girl Crazy,'' and whose last glow on the Great White Way was
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NYTimes article
ESTELLE WINWOOD, AN ACTRESS WHOSE CAREER BEGAN IN 1888
NYTimes - over 32 years
Estelle Winwood, an actress for nearly a century, died Wednesday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Los Angeles. She was 101 years old. Among her hundreds of appearances on stage, screen and television, Miss Winwood was perhaps best known for playing the Fairy Godmother to Leslie Caron's Cinderella in the 1955 movie ''The Glass
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NYTimes article
GOING OUT GUIDE
NYTimes - over 33 years
PORTER'S PARIS The Medicine Show Theater Ensemble will extend its run of Cole Porter's musical ''Paris'' for three weeks, beginning tonight. ''Paris,'' which dates from 1928, is vintage Porter - a rapid-fire fantasy that combines familiar material such as ''Let's Do It'' and ''Let's Misbehave'' with more obscure set numbers. In addition, three
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NYTimes article
ESTELLE WINWOOD TURNING 100 FEISTILY
NYTimes - about 34 years
On the brink of her 100th birthday Monday, Estelle Winwood tipples Gallo cream sherry, plays bridge three times a week and smokes three packs of cigarettes a day. Wearing metallic brown brocade and a huge triangular hat, gold bracelets on both arms and black patent-leather pumps, and looking like a cross between a medieval queen and a carving of an
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NYTimes article
Audrey Kelley Roos, a Writer Of Mystery Novels and Plays
NYTimes - about 34 years
Audrey Kelley Roos, a mystery writer and playwright, died yesterday of cancer on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. She was 70 years old and lived in Edgartown, on Martha's Vineyard. She collaborated with her husband, William E. Roos, on a number of mystery novels, including ''Made Up to Kill,'' ''Ghost of a Chance,'' ''Requiem for a Blonde,'' ''Murder in
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Estelle Winwood
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1984
    Age 101
    Winwood died in her sleep in Woodland Hills, California, in 1984, at age 101.
    More Details Hide Details She was interred in the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery.
  • 1946
    Age 63
    She made no cinematic films during the 1940s, but expressed a willingness to participate in the new medium of television, starring in a television production of Blithe Spirit in 1946.
    More Details Hide Details During the 1950s, she appeared more frequently in television than she did in film in such series as Robert Montgomery Presents, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and The Donna Reed Show. She played the character Hortense in the episode "Where's There's a Will" (August 30, 1960) on the ABC sitcom The Real McCoys starring Walter Brennan. Her few films from that period include The Glass Slipper (1955), The Swan (1956), and 23 Paces to Baker Street (1956). Her other film credits include Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959), The Misfits (1961), The Magic Sword (1962), The Notorious Landlady (1962), Dead Ringer (1964), Camelot (1967) and The Producers (1968). She later denigrated the last film, saying she could not imagine why she had done it except for the money. Her other work for television included guest roles in Dennis the Menace, The Twlight Zone, Thriller, Dr. Kildare, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., The Name of the Game, Bewitched, Batman, Love, American Style, Cannon, Police Story, and an excellent, showcasing, last episode of Perry Mason, entitled "The Final Fadeout", in which she plays a fading actress who ends up as a second defendant.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1916
    Age 33
    She moved to the U.S. in 1916 and made her Broadway début in New York City.
    More Details Hide Details Until the beginning of the 1930s, she divided her time between New York City and London. Throughout her career, her first love was the theatre; and, as the years passed, she appeared less frequently in London and became a frequent performer on Broadway, appearing in such plays as A Successful Calamity (1917), A Little Journey (1918), Spring Cleaning (1923), The Distaff Side (1934), The Importance of Being Earnest (which she also directed, 1939), When We Are Married (1939), Ladies in Retirement (1940), The Pirate (1942), Ten Little Indians (1944), Lady Windermere's Fan (1947), and The Madwoman of Chaillot (1948). Like many stage actors of her era, she expressed a distaste for films and resisted the offers she received during the 1920s. Finally, she relented and made her film début in Night Angel (1931), but her scenes were cut before the film's release. Her official film début came in The House of Trent (1933), and Quality Street (1937) was her first role of note.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1883
    Age 0
    Born Estelle Ruth Goodwin in Lee, Hundred of Blackheath, Kent, in 1883, she decided at the age of five that she wanted to be an actress.
    More Details Hide Details With her mother's support, but her father's disapproval, she trained with the Lyric Stage Academy in London, before making her professional debut in Johannesburg at the age of 20. During the First World War, she joined the Liverpool Repertory Company before moving on to a career in London's West End.
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