Eva Perón
Actress and First Lady of Argentina
Eva Perón
María Eva Duarte de Perón was the second wife of President Juan Perón (1895–1974) and served as the First Lady of Argentina from 1946 until her death in 1952. She is often referred to as simply Eva Perón, or by the affectionate Spanish language diminutive Evita. She was born in the village of Los Toldos in rural Argentina in 1919, the fourth of five children.
Biography
Eva Perón's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Eva Perón
News
News abour Eva Perón from around the web
Don't hide from me, Argentina - Charlotte Observer
Google News - over 5 years
Eva Perón's tomb, surprisingly modest in light of her first lady glamour, draws a steady stream of visitors. And everywhere there are angels: holding children, beckoning from domes, and suspended in mid-air flight. My grandparents were Americans
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Interpreting the Latin American Soul - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
The portraits in Krauze's book show one person after another, not all of them intellectuals, succumbing to these kinds of temptations, sometimes on the right (Eva Perón), sometimes the left (Che Guevara), sometimes in a vaguer or, in Krauze's word,
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Eva Peron likely had lobotomy, local doctor finds - Ct Post
Google News - over 5 years
Nijensohn was one of a team of researchers who worked on a paper showing that iconic Argentinian First Lady Eva Peron had a prefrontal lobotomy near the end of her life. Peron died in 1952 after a battle with cervical cancer
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Photo Flash: Ricky Martin Starts Rehearsing for EVITA! - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
Eva Perón used her beauty and charisma to rise meteorically from the slums of Argentina to the presidential mansion as First Lady. She won international acclaim and adoration from her own people as a champion of the poor, while glamour, power and greed
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Musical Theatre Heritage production of 'Evita' an admirable adaptation - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
That's the idea that drives “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and, of course, “Evita,” a romanticized depiction of Eva Peron, the first lady of Argentina, who died of cancer in 1952. In this absorbing musical's
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Robert Trussell | 'Evita' takes the stage again in Musical Theatre Heritage ... - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
As the second wife of Juan Peron, a military officer who rose to the presidency, Eva Peron was a champion of the poor and disadvantaged. She was only 33 when she died of cervical cancer and became a secular saint to her followers
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ARTS, BRIEFLY; For 'Evita,' A New Juan
NYTimes - over 5 years
Michael Cerveris, the Tony Award-winning actor (''Assassins''), will star as Juan Peron in ''Evita,'' a revival of that Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber musical opening on Broadway in the spring of 2012, the show's producers said on Monday. Mr. Cerveris joins a cast that includes the singer Ricky Martin as Che and the Olivier Award winner Elena
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Michael Cerveris to Join Broadway's Evita Revival at Marquis Theatre - TheaterMania.com
Google News - over 5 years
Evita tells the story of Argentina's Eva Peron, who used her beauty and charisma to rise meteorically from the slums of Argentina to the presidential mansion as First Lady. She won international acclaim and adoration from her own people as a champion
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Evita 'given lobotomy while dying of cancer' - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Eva Peron was given a lobotomy to ease her pain and suffering while she was dying of cancer, according to new research. By Fiona Govan, Madrid The controversial treatment Peron, affectionately known as Evita, received during the final stages of uterine
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'Evita': Theatre Winter Haven Production Rises to the Occasion - The Ledger
Google News - over 5 years
Eva Peron had a heck of a juicy story to tell, and it's no wonder that when community theaters decide to revive "Evita," they attract packed crowds like the one Theatre Winter Haven got on Sunday for the matinee of their first production of "Evita" in
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Review: Evita, Leeds Grand Theatre, until July 16 - The Press, York
Google News - over 5 years
Abigail Jaye does not fully fill those shoes in the role of Eva Peron, whose rags-to-riches rise took her from illegitimate beginnings in a poor village to First Lady status as the wife of Argentine dictator Juan Peron (Earl Carpenter)
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Facundo Cabral, celebrated Argentine folk singer, is killed - Washington Post
Google News - over 5 years
He ran away at age 9 to hitchhike the length of Argentina and claimed to have once snuck into the presidential palace in Buenos Aires, where he said he met Eva Peron and persuaded her to help his mother find a job. His adventures, including an early
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LOOK Musical Theatre closes out its season at PAC - Tulsa World
Google News - over 5 years
Christina Hager stars as Eva Peron in "Evita," playing at the Williams Theatre in the Tulsa PAC. JEFF LAUTENBERGER / Tulsa World By JAMES D. WATTS JR. World Scene Writer The "Light" is about to go out, and the "circus" is getting ready to leave town
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Police recover purported Eva Peron tiara - AFP
Google News - over 5 years
MADRID — Spanish and Italian police have recovered stolen jewels worth six million euros ($9 million), including a tiara that may have belonged to the late first lady of Argentina Eva Peron, the government said Wednesday. The jewels, snatched in a
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Bristol Hippodrome theatre review: Evita - Guide2Bristol
Google News - over 5 years
I visited the Bristol Hippodrome on Monday 27 June to watch Evita; written in the late 1970s by Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice the show tells the story of Eva Peron, the second wife of Argentine President Juan Peron, from her humble beginnings in
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Video: Eva Peron's Stolen Jewels Found Italy - Gamut News
Google News - over 5 years
This Local News video “Eva Peron's Stolen Jewels Found Italy” is copyright by KWTX – Waco, TX and brought to you by Gamut News. Feel free to share or embed this video but this video may not be broadcast, redistributed or rewritten in whole or part
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Police find Eva Peron's stolen jewels - ABC Online
Google News - over 5 years
Gems from a collection once owned by the late first lady of Argentina, Eva Peron, which had been stolen in Spain two years ago, were found in a luxury hotel in Milan, Italian police said. The jewels, worth 6 million euros, include a set of diamond ... -
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Eva Perón
    THIRTIES
  • 1952
    Age 32
    A memorial was held for the Argentine team during the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki due to Eva Perón's death during those games.
    More Details Hide Details On 9 August, Saturday, the body was transferred to the Congress Building for an additional day of public viewing, and a memorial service attended by the entire Argentine legislative body. The next day, after a final Mass, the coffin was laid on a gun carriage pulled by CGT officials. It was followed by Peron, his cabinet, Eva's family and friends, the delegates and representatives of the Partido Peronista Femenino—then workers, nurses and students of the Eva Peron Foundation. Flowers were thrown from balconies and windows.
    Despite all available treatment, she became emaciated, weighing only by June 1952. Evita died at the age of 33, at 20:25 on Saturday, 26 July 1952.
    More Details Hide Details Radio broadcasts throughout the country were interrupted with the announcement that "The Press Secretary's Office of the Presidency of the Nation fulfills its very sad duty to inform the people of the Republic that at 20:25 hours Mrs. Eva Perón, Spiritual Leader of the Nation, died." Ordinary activities ceased; movies stopped playing; restaurants were closed and patrons were shown to the door. Immediately after Perón's death, the government suspended all official activities for two days and ordered all flags flown at half-staff for ten days. It soon became apparent, however, that these measures fell short of reflecting popular grief. The crowd outside of the presidential residence, where Evita died, grew dense, congesting the streets for ten blocks in each direction. The morning after her death, while Evita's body was being moved to the Ministry of Labour Building, eight people were crushed to death in the throngs. In the following 24 hours, over 2000 people were treated in city hospitals for injuries sustained in the rush to be near Evita as her body was being transported, and thousands more would be treated on the spot. For the following two weeks, lines would stretch for many city blocks with mourners waiting hours to see Evita's body lie at the Ministry of Labour.
    On 4 June 1952, Evita rode with Juan Perón in a parade through Buenos Aires in celebration of his re-election as President of Argentina.
    More Details Hide Details Evita was by this point so ill that she was unable to stand without support. Underneath her oversized fur coat was a frame made of plaster and wire that allowed her to stand. She took a triple dose of pain medication before the parade, and took another two doses when she returned home. In a ceremony a few days after Juan Perón's second inauguration, Evita was given the official title of "Spiritual Leader of the Nation." Although Perón had undergone a hysterectomy performed by the American surgeon George T. Pack, the cancer had metastasized and returned rapidly. She was the first Argentine to undergo chemotherapy (a novel treatment at that time).
  • 1951
    Age 31
    By 1951, it had become evident that her health was rapidly deteriorating.
    More Details Hide Details Although her diagnosis was withheld from her by Juan, she knew she was not well, and a bid for the vice-presidency was not practical. Only a few months after "the Renunciation", Evita underwent a secret radical hysterectomy in an attempt to eradicate her advanced cervical cancer. In 2011, a Yale neurosurgeon studied Evita's skull x-rays and photographic evidence and said that Perón may have been given a prefrontal lobotomy in the last months of her life, " to relieve the pain, agitation and anxiety she suffered in the final months of her illness."
    In 1951, Evita set her sights on earning a place on the ballot as candidate for vice-president.
    More Details Hide Details This move angered many military leaders who despised Evita and her increasing powers within the government. According to the Argentine Constitution, the Vice President automatically succeeds the President in the event of the President's death. The possibility of Evita becoming president in the event of Juan Perón's death was not something the military could accept. She did, however, receive great support from the working class, the unions, and the Peronist Women's Party. The intensity of the support she drew from these groups is said to have surprised even Juan Perón himself. Fraser and Navarro write that the wide support Evita's proposed candidacy generated indicated to him that Evita had become as important to members of the Peronist party as Juan Perón himself was. On 22 August 1951, the unions held a mass rally of two million people called "Cabildo Abierto." (The name "Cabildo Abierto" was a reference and tribute to the first local Argentine government of the May Revolution, in 1810.) The Peróns addressed the crowd from the balcony of a huge scaffolding set up on the Avenida 9 de Julio, several blocks away from the Casa Rosada, the official government house of Argentina. Overhead were two large portraits of Eva and Juan Perón. It has been claimed that "Cabildo Abierto" was the largest public display of support in history for a female political figure.
    In 1951, Eva Perón announced her candidacy for the Peronist nomination for the office of Vice President of Argentina, receiving great support from the Peronist political base, low-income and working-class Argentines who were referred to as descamisados or "shirtless ones".
    More Details Hide Details However, opposition from the nation's military and bourgeoisie, coupled with her declining health, ultimately forced her to withdraw her candidacy.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1948
    Age 28
    The Fundación María Eva Duarte de Perón was created on 8 July 1948.
    More Details Hide Details It was later renamed to, simply, the Eva Perón Foundation. Its funding began with 10,000 pesos provided by Evita herself. In The Woman with the Whip, the first English language biography of Eva Perón, author Mary Main writes that no account records were kept for the foundation because it was merely a means of funneling government money into private Swiss bank accounts controlled by the Peróns. Fraser and Navarro, however, counter these claims, writing that Ramón Cereijo, Minister of Finance, kept records, and that the foundation "began as the simplest response to the poverty (Evita) encountered each day in her office" and "the appalling backwardness of social services—or charity, as it was still called—in Argentina." Crassweller writes that the foundation was supported by donations of cash and goods from the Peronist unions and private businesses, and that the Confederación General del Trabajo donated three man-days (later reduced to two) of salary for every worker per year. Tax on lottery and movie tickets also helped to support the foundation, as did a levy on casino and revenue from horse races. Crassweller also notes that there were some cases of businesses being pressured to donate to the foundation, with negative repercussions resulting if requests for donations were not met.
  • 1947
    Age 27
    This was the only time in the periodical's history that a South American first lady appeared alone on its cover. (In 1951, Eva appeared again with Juan Perón.) However, the 1947 cover story was also the first publication to mention that Eva had been born out of wedlock.
    More Details Hide Details In retaliation, the periodical was banned from Argentina for several months. After returning to Argentina from Europe, Evita never again appeared in public with the complicated hairdos of her movie star days. The brilliant gold color became more subdued in tone, and even the style changed, her hair being pulled back severely into a heavy braided chignon. Additionally, her extravagant clothing became more refined after the tour. No longer did she wear the elaborate hats and form-fitting dresses of Argentine designers. Soon she adopted simpler and more fashionable Paris couture and became particularly attached to the fashions of Christian Dior and the jewels of Cartier. In an attempt to cultivate a more serious political persona, Eva began to appear in public wearing conservative though stylish tailleurs (a business-like combination of skirts and jackets), which also were made by Dior and other Paris couture houses.
    In 1947, Eva embarked on a much-publicized "Rainbow Tour" of Europe, meeting with numerous dignitaries and heads of state, such as Francisco Franco and Pope Pius XII.
    More Details Hide Details Biographers Fraser and Navarro write that the tour had its genesis in an invitation the Spanish leader had extended to Juan Perón. For political reasons it was decided that Eva, rather than Juan Perón, should make the visit. Fraser and Navarro write that Argentina had only recently emerged from its "wartime quarantine", thus taking its place in the United Nations and improving relations with the United States. Therefore, a visit to Franco, with António Salazar of Portugal the last remaining west European authoritarian leaders in power, would be diplomatically frowned upon internationally. Fraser and Navarro write that Eva decided that, if Juan Perón would not accept Franco's invitation for a state visit to Spain, then she would. Advisors then decided that Eva should visit many European countries in addition to Spain. This would make it seem that Eva's sympathies were not specifically with Franco's fascist Spain but with all of Europe. The tour was billed not as a political tour but as a non-political "goodwill" tour.
  • 1946
    Age 26
    After becoming the first lady in 1946, Evita had her birth records altered to read that she had been born to married parents, and placed her birth date three years forward, making herself younger.
    More Details Hide Details Shortly after Evita's death, Dr. Pedro Ara was approached to embalm the body. Fraser and Navarro write that it is doubtful that Evita ever expressed a wish to be embalmed, and suggest that it was most likely Juan Perón's decision. Ara was a professor of anatomy who had studied in Vienna and maintained an academic career in Madrid. His work was occasionally referred to as "the art of death." His highly advanced embalming technique consisted of replacing the corpse's blood with glycerine, which preserved all organs including the brain and created a lifelike appearance, giving the body the appearance of "artistically rendered sleep." Ara was known in Buenos Aires society for his work. Among the people he had embalmed was Spanish composer Manuel de Falla. Ara claims that his embalming of Evita's corpse began on the night of her death and that by the next morning, "the body of Eva Perón was completely and infinitely incorruptible" and suitable for display to the public.
    After his release from prison, Juan Perón decided to campaign for the presidency of the nation, which he won in a landslide. Eva campaigned heavily for her husband during his 1946 presidential bid.
    More Details Hide Details Using her weekly radio show, she delivered powerful speeches with heavy populist rhetoric urging the poor to align themselves with Perón's movement. Though she had become wealthy from her radio and modeling success, she highlighted her own humble upbringing as a way of showing solidarity with the impoverished classes. Along with her husband, Eva visited every corner of the country, becoming the first woman in Argentina's history to appear in public on the campaign trail with her husband. Eva's appearance alongside her husband often offended the establishment of the wealthy, the military, and those in political life. However, she was very popular with the general public who knew her from her radio and motion picture appearances. It was during this phase of her life that she first encouraged the Argentine population to refer to her not as "Eva Perón" but simply as "Evita", which is a Spanish diminutive or affectionate nickname roughly equivalent to "Little Eva" or "Evie."
    Juan Perón was elected President of Argentina in 1946; during the next 6 years, Eva Perón became powerful within the pro-Peronist trade unions, primarily for speaking on behalf of labor rights.
    More Details Hide Details She also ran the Ministries of Labor and Health, founded and ran the charitable Eva Perón Foundation, championed women's suffrage in Argentina, and founded and ran the nation's first large-scale female political party, the Female Peronist Party.
  • 1945
    Age 25
    Eva and Juan were married discreetly in a civil ceremony in Junín on 18 October 1945 and in a church wedding on 9 December 1945.
    More Details Hide Details
    Eva Perón has often been credited with organizing the rally of thousands that freed Juan Perón from prison on 17 October 1945.
    More Details Hide Details This version of events was popularized in the movie version of the Lloyd Webber musical. Most historians, however, agree that this version of events is unlikely. At the time of Perón's imprisonment, Eva was still merely an actress. She had no political clout with the various labor unions, and it is claimed that she was not well-liked within Perón's inner circle, nor was she liked by many within the film and radio business at this point. When Juan Perón was imprisoned, Eva Duarte was suddenly disenfranchised. In reality, the massive rally that freed Perón from prison was organized by the various unions, such as General Labor Confederation, or CGT as they came to be known. To this day, the date of 17 October is something of a holiday for the Justicialist Party in Argentina (celebrated as Día de la Lealtad, or "Loyalty Day"). What would follow was shocking and nearly unheard of. The well connected and politically rising star, Juan Peron, married Eva. Despite Eva's childhood illegitimacy, and having an uncertain reputation, Peron was in love with Eva, and her loyal devotion to him even while he had been under arrest touched him deeply, and so he married her, providing a respectability she had never known.
    By early 1945, a group of Army officers called the GOU for "Grupo de Oficiales Unidos" (United Officers Group), nicknamed "The Colonels", had gained considerable influence within the Argentine government. President Pedro Pablo Ramírez became wary of Juan Perón's growing power within the government, but was unable to curb that power. On 24 February 1944, Ramírez signed his own resignation paper, which Fraser and Navarro claim was drafted by Juan Perón himself.
    More Details Hide Details Edelmiro Julián Farrell, a friend of Juan Perón, became President. Juan Perón returned to his job as Labor Minister. Fraser and Navarro claim that, by this point, Perón was the most powerful man in the Argentine government. On 9 October 1945 Juan Perón was arrested by his opponents within the government who feared that due to the strong support of the descamisados, the workers and the poor of the nation, Perón's popularity might eclipse that of the sitting president. Six days later, between 250,000 and 350,000 people gathered in front of the Casa Rosada, Argentina's government house, to demand Juan Perón's release, and their wish was granted. At 11 pm, Juan Perón stepped on to the balcony of the Casa Rosada and addressed the crowd. Biographer Robert D. Crassweller claims that this moment was very powerful because it was very dramatic and recalled many important aspects of Argentine history. Crassweller writes that Juan Perón enacted the role of a caudillo addressing his people in the tradition of Argentine leaders Rosas and Yrigoyen. Crassweller also claims that the evening contained "mystic overtones" of a "quasi-religious" nature.
    A desire to expunge this part of her life might have been a motivation for Eva to arrange the destruction of her original birth certificate in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details When Duarte suddenly died and his mistress and their children sought to attend his funeral, there was an unpleasant scene at the church gates. Although Juana and the children were permitted to enter and pay their respects to Duarte, they were promptly directed out of the church. Mrs. Juan Duarte did not want her husband's mistress and children at the funeral and, as those of the legitimate wife, her orders were respected.
    It is thought that in 1945 the adult Eva Perón created a forgery of her birth certificate for her marriage.
    More Details Hide Details Eva Perón spent her childhood in Junín, Buenos Aires province. Her father, Juan Duarte, was descended from French Basque immigrants, meanwhile her mother Juana Ibarguren, was descended from Spanish Basque immigrants. Juan Duarte, a wealthy rancher from nearby Chivilcoy, already had a wife and family there. At that time in rural Argentina, it was not uncommon for a wealthy man to have multiple families. When Eva was a year old, Duarte returned permanently to his legal family, leaving Juana Ibarguren and her children in penury. Ibarguren and her children were forced to move to the poorest area of Junín. Los Toldos was a village in the dusty region of Las Pampas, with a reputation as a desolate place of abject poverty. To support herself and her children, Ibarguren sewed clothes for neighbors. The family was stigmatized by the abandonment of the father and by the illegitimate status of the children under Argentine law, and was consequently somewhat isolated.
  • 1944
    Age 24
    It was at this gala, on 22 January 1944, that Eva Duarte first met Colonel Juan Perón.
    More Details Hide Details Eva promptly became the colonel's mistress. Eva referred to the day she met her future husband as her "marvelous day". Fraser and Navarro write that Juan Perón and Eva left the gala together at around two in the morning. Fraser and Navarro claim that Eva Duarte had no knowledge of or interest in politics prior to meeting Perón. Therefore, she never argued with Perón or any of his inner circle, but merely absorbed what she heard. Juan Perón later claimed in his memoir that he purposefully selected Eva as his pupil, and set out to create in her a "second I." Fraser and Navarro, however, suggest that Juan Perón allowed Eva Duarte such intimate exposure and knowledge of his inner circle because of his age: he was 48 and she was 24 when they met. He had come to politics late in life, and was therefore free of preconceived ideas of how his political career should be conducted, and he was willing to accept whatever aid she offered him.
  • 1942
    Age 22
    As a result of her success with radio dramas and the films, Eva achieved some financial stability. In 1942, she was able to move into her own apartment in the exclusive neighborhood of Recoleta, on 1567 Calle Posadas. The next year Eva began her career in politics, as one of the founders of the Argentine Radio Syndicate (ARA). On 15 January 1944, an earthquake occurred in the town of San Juan, Argentina, killing some 10,000 people.
    More Details Hide Details In response, Perón, who was then the Secretary of Labour, established a fund to raise money to aid the victims. He devised a plan to have an "artistic festival" as a fundraiser, and invited radio and film actors to participate. After a week of fundraising, all participants met at a gala held at Luna Park Stadium in Buenos Aires to benefit earthquake victims.
    In 1942, Eva experienced some economic stability when a company called Candilejas (sponsored by a soap manufacturer) hired her for a daily role in one of their radio dramas called Muy bien, which aired on Radio El Mundo (World Radio), the most important radio station in the country at that time.
    More Details Hide Details Later that year, she signed a five-year contract with Radio Belgrano, which assured her a role in a popular historical-drama program called Great Women of History, in which she played Elizabeth I of England, Sarah Bernhardt, and the last Tsarina of Russia. Eventually, Eva Duarte came to co-own the radio company. By 1943, Eva Duarte was earning five or six thousand pesos a month, making her one of the highest-paid radio actresses in the nation. Pablo Raccioppi, who jointly ran Radio El Mundo with Eva Duarte, is said to have not liked her, but to have noted that she was "thoroughly dependable". Eva also had a short-lived film career, but none of the films in which she appeared were hugely successful. In one of her last films, La cabalgata del circo (The Circus Cavalcade), Eva played a young country girl who rivaled an older woman, the movie's star, Libertad Lamarque.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1936
    Age 16
    In 1936, Eva toured nationally with a theater company, worked as a model, and was cast in a few B-grade movie melodramas.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1935
    Age 15
    On 28 March 1935, she had her professional debut in the play Mrs. Perez (la Señora de Pérez), at the Comedias Theater.
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  • 1934
    Age 14
    It is often reported that Eva traveled to Buenos Aires by train with tango singer Agustín Magaldi. However, biographers Marysa Navarro and Nicholas Fraser maintain that this is unlikely, as there is no record of the married Magaldi performing in Junín in 1934 (and, even if he had, he usually traveled with his wife).
    More Details Hide Details Eva's sisters maintain that Eva traveled to Buenos Aires with their mother. The sisters also claim that Doña Juana accompanied her daughter to an audition at a radio station and arranged for Eva to live with the Bustamante family, who were friends of the Duarte family. While the method of Eva's escape from her bleak provincial surroundings is debated, she did begin a new life in Buenos Aires. Upon arrival in Buenos Aires, Eva Duarte was faced with the difficulties of surviving without formal education or connections. The city was especially overcrowded during this period because of the migrations caused by the Great Depression.
    In her autobiography, she explained that all the people from her own town who had been to the big cities described them as "marvelous places, where nothing was given but wealth". In 1934, at the age of 15, Eva escaped her poverty-stricken village when, according to popular myth, she ran off with a young musician to the nation's capital of Buenos Aires.
    More Details Hide Details The young couple's relationship would end almost as quickly as it began, but Eva remained in Buenos Aires. She began to pursue jobs on the stage and the radio, and eventually became a film actress. Eva had a series of relationships, and via some of these men she did acquire a number of her modeling appointments. She bleached her natural black hair to blond, a look she would maintain for the duration of her life.
  • 1933
    Age 13
    Eva's love of acting was reinforced when, in October 1933, she played a small role in a school play called Arriba estudiantes (Students Arise), which Barnes describes as "an emotional, patriotic, flag-waving melodrama."
    More Details Hide Details After the play, Eva was determined to become an actress.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1922
    Age 2
    Eva's autobiography, La Razón de mi Vida, contains no dates or references to childhood occurrences, and does not list the location of her birth or her name at birth. According to Junín's civil registry, a birth certificate shows that one María Eva Duarte was born on 7 May 1922.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1919
    Born
    Her baptismal certificate, however, lists the date of birth as 7 May 1919 under the name Eva María Ibarguren.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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