Farah Pahlavi
Empress of Iran
Farah Pahlavi
Farah Pahlavi, Her Imperial Majesty, Empress of Iran is the former Queen and Empress of Iran. She is the widow of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the Shah of Iran, and the only person to hold the title of Empress since pre-Islamic Iran. She was Queen consort of Iran from 1959 until 1967 and Empress consort from 1967 until exile in 1979.
Biography
Farah Pahlavi's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of Farah Pahlavi
News
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Despotfruar landar mjukare - Sydsvenskan
Google News - over 5 years
Farah Pahlavi, Iran. 73 år. Gifte sig 1959 med shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. Var betydligt populärare än maken. Flydde 1979 med honom och barnen undan revolutionen. Tvingades resa från land till land och söka asyl. Blev änka 1980
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Google News article
Lionel Duroy : le chagrin, la colère et la ruine - Suite101.fr
Google News - over 5 years
Duroy continue à écrire, et prête sa plume à d'autres pour rédiger leurs mémoires (Ingrid Betancourt, Farah Pahlavi, Sylvie Vartan, Mireille Darc, J.-M. Bigard...). Mais il n'est pas encore débarrassé de son enfance. En 2010 paraît Le chagrin (éd
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Google News article
El presidente sirio, ¿más cerca de España? - Heraldo de Aragón
Google News - over 5 years
Farah Pahlavi, la tercera mujer del último Sha de Irán, pese a no haber establecido nunca su residencia en España de forma oficial, ha visitado durante décadas nuestro país, donde en los años 80 poseía diversas propiedades inmobiliarias en Mallorca,
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Bijan Pakzad, Designer and Billboard King, Remembered - LA Weekly (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Other luminaries appeared via video: HIM Empress Farah Pahlavi holding forth about proud Iranian Bijan and his love for her late husband, the Shah; George HW Bush congratulating Bijan and wishing him "continued success" before Bijan's son, Nicolas,
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Aménagement du territoire :L'Etat parie sur la création d'emplois et la croissance - Le Soleil
Google News - almost 6 years
Il ya aussi le projet « Farah Pahlavi », la création de pôles de développement avec la coopération iranienne. Les Terres neuves ont connu un début de réalisation. Le projet "Keur Farah Pahlavi" n'a pas connu de réalisation. Le seul rescapé de ce projet
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World Press on Iran, Turkey and the Caucasus (May 5-6, 2011) - vestnik kavkaza
Google News - almost 6 years
The photographer said that he asked permission of Iran's empress to take it: “At the time, you couldn't charter a plane and start taking photographs from it – you couldn't do that in Iran today, either – so I wrote to the then empress, Farah Pahlavi,
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Photographer Georg Gerster's best shot - The Guardian
Google News - almost 6 years
At the time, you couldn't charter a plane and start taking photographs from it – you couldn't do that in Iran today, either – so I wrote to the then empress, Farah Pahlavi, to ask her permission. She put a small passenger plane and two pilots at my
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A NIGHT OUT WITH | GEOFFREY ZAKARIAN; He Doesn't Comp (Much)
NYTimes - over 6 years
IT was Thursday night at the Lambs Club, and Geoffrey Zakarian, the chef, stood in the center of the kitchen, peering into an iPhone app called Total Control, which was streaming live video from his security cameras. Mr. Zakarian's attention to detail, it seems, is rivaled only by his gusto for control. ''There's me!'' he said excitedly, pointing
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Iranians Shine, Assisted By Expatriate
NYTimes - over 7 years
IN recent months biennials around the world have dedicated special sections to a hot new field: Middle Eastern artists. And many of the most celebrated hail from Iran, like Farhad Moshiri of Tehran, whose paintings covered with Swaroski crystal-encrusted calligraphy have brought $1 million-plus at auction, or Shirin Neshat of New York, widely
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NYTimes article
PARIS JOURNAL; France Mourns and Celebrates the Ultimate Couturier
NYTimes - over 8 years
Two shopgirls in their uniform red jackets and black blouses stared down from the windows above the Elena Miro shop on the Rue du Faubourg St.-Honoré on Thursday, as the fashion world gathered below to mourn Yves Saint Laurent. Elena Miro is across the narrow street, blocked by the police, from the St.-Roch Church, sometimes considered ''the
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THE TALK; Masterpiece Basement
NYTimes - about 9 years
If you happened to be in Tehran between 1977 and 1979, you might have seen the incredible collection of 19th- and 20th-century Western masterpieces on display at the Iranian capital's newly inaugurated Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. Only a handful of Westerners have seen it since, making a trip to the museum's basement one of the art world's
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Recycling Opulence and Helping a Good Cause
NYTimes - almost 10 years
SOMEONE'S dream kitchen sits waiting in an industrial space in the Black Rock section of Bridgeport. Its custom-milled cabinets and marble countertops embrace high-end faucets, hardware and appliances -- Sub-Zero refrigerator, Miele dishwasher, a handsome French-made Lacanche stove. Here at Measure for Measure, a store that also sells ''green''
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Arts, Briefly
NYTimes - over 11 years
Rare Beatles Items in London Pop Auction The first draft of the lyrics for ''I'm Only Sleeping,'' written by John Lennon in 1966 for the Beatles' groundbreaking album ''Revolver,'' is expected to fetch more than £200,000 ($366,407) at Christie's in London on Sept. 28. Other likely highlights of the pop memorabilia sale are the only existing
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NYTimes article
The Last Empress
NYTimes - almost 13 years
AN ENDURING LOVE By Farah Pahlavi. Translated by Patricia Clancy. Illustrated. 447 pp. New York: Miramax Books. $24.95. IN a television interview with Barbara Walters in 1977, two years before he was overthrown in a popular revolution, Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi talked bluntly -- about women and his wife. The interview went like this: Walters: I'm
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THE WAY WE LIVE NOW: 2-29-04: QUESTIONS FOR FARAH PAHLAVI; A Life in Exile
NYTimes - almost 13 years
Q: Your new memoirs, ''An Enduring Love: My Life With the Shah,'' offer a reverential look at your late husband, Reza Pahlavi, who ruled Iran from 1941 until he was toppled in 1979. He was above all a patriot who wanted progress and modernity in our country. I tell my life as I lived it. In the 25 years since he was overthrown by the Islamic
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NYTimes article
In Defense of the Shah: The Widow's Tale
NYTimes - almost 17 years
To the Editor: Your April 16 front-page article ''How a Plot Convulsed Iran in '53 (and in '79)'' makes unjust remarks about my late husband, Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlevi. It also gives a partial account of the events of 1953. My husband at first supported Prime Minister Mohammed Mossadegh in the fight for the nationalization of Iran's oil industry.
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NYTimes article
Relatives and Dignitaries Gather To Honor Margaret Rockefeller
NYTimes - almost 21 years
The bell of St. James Episcopal Church in Manhattan tolled 80 times yesterday as 2,000 family members and friends stood in tribute at a memorial service for Margaret Rockefeller. Mrs. Rockefeller, a philanthropist and the wife of David Rockefeller, the former chairman of the Chase Manhattan Bank, died on March 26 at the age of 80. Five generations
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Farah Pahlavi
    THIRTIES
  • 2004
    Farah Pahlavi continues to appear at certain international royal events, such as the 2004 wedding of Crown Prince Frederik of Denmark, the 2010 wedding of Prince Nikolaos of Greece and Denmark and the 2011 wedding of Albert II, Prince of Monaco.
    More Details Hide Details Farah Pahlavi currently has three grandchildren (granddaughters) through her son Reza Pahlavi and his wife Yasmine. Farah Pahlavi also has one granddaughter through her late son Alireza Pahlavi and his companion Raha Didevar.
  • 2003
    In 2003, Farah Pahlavi wrote a book about her marriage to Mohammad Reza entitled An Enduring Love: My Life with the Shah.
    More Details Hide Details The publication of the former Empress's memoirs attracted international interest. It was a best-seller in Europe, with excerpts appearing in news magazines and the author appearing on talk shows and in other media outlets. However, opinion about the book, which Publishers Weekly called "a candid, straightforward account" and the Washington Post called "engrossing", was mixed. Elaine Sciolino, the The New York Timess Paris bureau chief, gave the book a less than flattering review, describing it as "well translated" but "full of anger and bitterness". But National Review's Reza Bayegan, an Iranian writer, praised the memoir as "abounding with affection and sympathy for her countrymen." In 2009 the Persian-Swedish director Nahid Persson Sarvestani released a feature length documentary about Farah Pahlavi's life, entitled The Queen and I. The film was screened in various International film festivals such as IDFA and Sundance. In 2012 the Dutch director Kees Roorda made a theater play inspired by the life of Farah Pahlavi in exile. In the play Liz Snoijink acted as Farah Diba.
  • 2001
    She first settled in Williamstown, Massachusetts, but later bought a home in Greenwich, Connecticut. After the death of her daughter Princess Leila in 2001, she purchased a smaller home in Potomac, Maryland, near Washington, D.C., to be closer to her son and grandchildren.
    More Details Hide Details Farah now divides her time between Washington, D.C, and Paris. She also makes an annual July pilgrimage to the late Shah's mausoleum at Cairo's al-Rifa'i Mosque. Farah supports charities, including the Annual Alzheimer Gala IFRAD (International Fund Raising for Alzheimer Disease) held in Paris.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1981
    After the Shah's death, the exiled Shahbanu remained in Egypt for nearly two years. President Sadat gave her and her family use of Koubbeh Palace in Cairo. A few months after President Sadat’s assassination in October 1981, the Shabanu and her family left Egypt.
    More Details Hide Details President Ronald Reagan informed her that she was welcome in the United States.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1972
    This was achieved with the help of the brothers Houshang and Mehdi Mahboubian, the most prominent Iranian antiquities dealers of the era, who advised the Empress from 1972 to 1978.
    More Details Hide Details With these artifacts she founded several national museums (many of which still survive to this day) and began an Iranian version of the National Trust. Museums and cultural centres created under her guidance include the Negarestan Cultural Center, the Reza Abbasi Museum, the Khorramabad Museum with its valuable collection of Lorestān bronzes, the National Carpet Gallery and the Abgineh Museum for ceramics and glass works. Aside from building a collection of historic Iranian artifacts, the Empress also expressed interest in acquiring contemporary Western and Iranian art. To this end, she put her significant patronage behind the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art. The fruits of her work in founding and expanding that institution are perhaps the Empress' most enduring cultural legacy to the people of Iran. Using funds allocated from the Government, the Empress took advantage of a somewhat depressed art market of the 1970s to purchase several important works of Western art. Under her guidance, the Museum acquired nearly 150 works by such artists as Pablo Picasso, Claude Monet, George Grosz, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, and Roy Lichtenstein. Today, the collection of the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art is widely considered to be one of the most significant outside Europe and the United States. It is somewhat remarkable then, according to Parviz Tanavoli, a modern Iranian sculptor and a former Cultural Adviser to the Empress, that the impressive collection was amassed for "tens, not hundreds, of millions of dollars".
  • OTHER
  • 1967
    This occasionally controversial event was held annually from 1967 until 1977 and featured live performances by both Iranian and Western artists.
    More Details Hide Details The majority of her time, however, went into the creation of museums and the building of their collections. Historically a culturally rich country, the Iran of the 1960s had little to show for it. Many of the great artistic treasures produced during its 2,500-year history had found their way into the hands of foreign museums and private collections. It became one of the Empress's principal goals to procure for Iran an appropriate collection of its own historic artifacts. To that end, she secured from her husband's government permission and funds to "buy back" a wide selection of Iranian artifacts from foreign and domestic collections.
    Her significance was exemplified by her part in the 1967 Coronation Ceremonies, where she was crowned as the first shahbanu (empress) of modern Iran.
    More Details Hide Details It was again confirmed when the Shah named her as the official regent should he die or be incapacitated before the Crown Prince's 21st birthday. The naming of a woman as regent was highly unusual for a Middle Eastern or Muslim monarchy. From the beginning of her reign, the Empress took an active interest in promoting culture and the arts in Iran. Through her patronage, numerous organizations were created and fostered to further her ambition of bringing historical and contemporary Iranian Art to prominence both inside Iran and in the Western world. In addition to her own efforts, the Empress sought to achieve this goal with the assistance of various foundations and advisers. Her ministry encouraged many forms of artistic expression, including traditional Iranian arts (such as weaving, singing, and poetry recital) as well as Western theatre. Her most recognized endeavour supporting the performing arts was her patronage of the Shiraz Arts Festival.
  • 1959
    It was during such a meeting in 1959 at the Iranian Embassy in Paris that Farah Diba was first presented to Mohammed Reza Pahlavi. After returning to Tehran in the summer of 1959, the Shah and Farah Diba began a carefully choreographed courtship, orchestrated in part by the Shah's daughter Princess Shahnaz. The couple announced their engagement on 23 November 1959. Farah Diba married Shah Mohammed Reza on 20 December 1959, aged 21.
    More Details Hide Details The young Queen of Iran (as she was styled at the time) was the object of much curiosity and her wedding received worldwide press attention. Her gown was by Yves Saint Laurent, then a designer at the house of Dior, and she wore the newly commissioned Noor-ol-Ain Diamond tiara. After the pomp and celebrations associated with the Imperial wedding, the success of this union became contingent upon the Queen’s ability to produce a male heir. Although he had been married twice before, the Shah’s previous marriages had given him only a daughter who, under agnatic primogeniture, could not inherit the throne. The pressure for the young Queen was acute. The Shah himself was deeply anxious to have a male heir as were the members of his government. Furthermore, it was known that the dissolution of the Shah's previous marriage to Queen Soraya had been due to her infertility.
  • 1948
    Farah enjoyed an extremely close bond with her father and his unexpected death in 1948 deeply affected her.
    More Details Hide Details This situation furthermore left the young family in a difficult financial state. In these reduced circumstances, they were forced to move from their large family villa in northern Tehran into a shared apartment with one of Farideh Ghotbi's brothers. The young Farah Diba began her education at Tehran's Italian School, then moved to the French Jeanne d'Arc School until to age of sixteen and later to the Lycée Razi. She was an accomplished athlete in her youth and became captain of her school's basketball team. Upon finishing her studies at the Lycée Razi, she pursued an interest in architecture at the École Spéciale d'Architecture in Paris, where she was a student of Albert Besson. Many Iranian students who were studying abroad at this time were dependent on State sponsorship. Therefore, when the Shah, as head of state, made official visits to foreign countries, he frequently met with a selection of local Iranian students.
  • 1938
    Farah Diba was born on 14 October 1938 in the Iranian capital Tehran, to an upper-class family.
    More Details Hide Details Born as Farah Diba, she was the only child of Captain Sohrab Diba (1899–1948) and his wife, Farideh Ghotbi (1920–2000). Pahlavi's father's family is of Iranian Azerbaijani origin. In her memoir, the former Shahbanu writes that her father's family were natives of Iranian Azerbaijan while her mother's family were from Lahijan on the Iranian coast of the Caspian Sea. Through her father, Farah came from a relatively affluent background. In the late 19th century her grandfather had been an accomplished diplomat, serving as the Iranian Ambassador to the Romanov Court in Moscow, Russia. Her own father was an officer in the Imperial Iranian Armed Forces and a graduate of the prestigious French Military Academy at St. Cyr.
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