Fausto Coppi
Cycling legend
Fausto Coppi
Angelo Fausto Coppi, was the dominant international cyclist of the years each side of the Second World War. His successes earned him the title Il Campionissimo, or champion of champions. He was an all-round racing cyclist: he excelled in both climbing and time trialing, and was also a great sprinter. He won the Giro d'Italia five times, the Tour de France twice, and the World Championship in 1953.
Biography
Fausto Coppi's personal information overview.
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Futsal, al via il calcio a 5 - Corriere Cesenate
Google News - over 5 years
La compagine bianconera disputa il campionato di serie C1 e gioca tutte le partite casalinghe al nuovo palasport di Cesena in via Fausto Coppi, davanti al Carisport. Il presidente Stefano Ceccarelli ha confermato, alla guida tecnica,
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28 agosto: Alta Langa Granfondo della nocciola - Paperblog
Google News - over 5 years
Domenica 28 agosto alle ore 10 con partenza a Bossolasco, nei dintorni di Cuneo, si terrà la V edizione della 'Alta Langa Granfondo della nocciola', una gara di granfondo di ciclismo organizzata dall'ASD Fausto Coppi on the road in collaborazione con
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Due percorsi tra colline e noccioleti dell'Alta Langa per la Granfondo di ... - Cuneocronaca.it
Google News - over 5 years
I partecipanti dovranno affrontare quattro salite (due in meno delle 6 previste nel percorso originale) di diversa difficoltà, dedicate, come orami da tradizione, ai grandi nomi del ciclismo del passato: Jacques Anquetil, Fausto Coppi, Charly Gaul e
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Recco: che delusione il racconto su Coppi - Levante News
Google News - over 5 years
La Stampa ha affidato al giornalista-scrittore Marco Albino Ferrari il compito di ricostruire il ritorno di Fausto Coppi in bicicletta, da Caserta dove si trovava a fine guerra, fino a Cstellania, il suo paese in provincia di Alessandria
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Quando Fausto Coppi nel 1945 arrivò a Recco - Levante News
Google News - over 5 years
Marco Albino Ferrari, ha ricostruito sulla Stampa il ritorno a casa, nel 1945 a guerra finita, di Fausto Coppi, in bicicletta, da Caserta alla sua Castellania. Un racconto a tappe, ripercorrendo quelle effettivamente vissute dal campione
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Quattro giorni nelle Terre dei Campionissimi del ciclismo, Fausto Coppi e ... - AT news
Google News - over 5 years
0143.772233 – 772259 e- mail turismo@comune.noviligure.al.it compilando la scheda disponibile sul sito www.comune.noviligure.al.it Quattro giorni nelle Terre dei Campionissimi del ciclismo, Fausto Coppi e Costante Girardengo, per vivere da vicino una
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Cesenatico - Una settimana di lutto per Matteo - Romagna Noi
Google News - over 5 years
Il team Fausto Coppi abbandona le gare ufficiali fino al 19 agosto dopo la notizia della morte del tesserato in seguito a un incidente stradale in auto col padre CESENATICO - "Nel giorno del dolore e del cordoglio, ci piace ricordare il sorriso
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Con Coppi sulle strade della libertà - La Stampa
Google News - over 5 years
Nel 1945, alla fine della guerra, Fausto Coppi tornò a casa, a Castellania, partendo - in bicicletta - da Caserta. Abbiamo rifatto il suo stesso percorso, e lo racconteremo in dieci puntate. Questa è la prima Il primo raggio di luce di quella tiepida
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Tour de France teams push for radio ban to be lifted - Times of India
Google News - over 5 years
"The Tour has become something extremely professional _ there are sponsors who pay millions of dollars to the big teams here _ trying to turn the sport into an amateurish thing, to bring down the technology, to race like Fausto Coppi, is not a good
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Ciclismo: tutti i numeri de La Fausto Coppi Selle San Marco 2011 - Campioni.Cn sport in provincia di Cuneo
Google News - over 5 years
Calato il sipario sull'edizione 2011 de La Fausto Coppi Selle San Marco, è tempo di bilanci e ringraziamenti. Nonostante la modifica subita dal percorso lungo, sono stati tanti gli atleti che hanno deciso di prendere parte alla mitica maratona
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Tour de France: Disgraced Contador's battling may plunge race into turmoil - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
There have been other such Tours, but they are the exception: Bernard Hinault's fightback from a 3min deficit in 1979; further back, Fausto Coppi's epic of 1949 and Charly Gaul in 1954. If Contador were to do something even remotely comparable,
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Con 2180 atleti da tutto il mondo la Fausto Coppi 2011 segna il successo - Campioni.Cn sport in provincia di Cuneo
Google News - over 5 years
E' stato uno dei pochi a non indossare la maglia ufficiale della Fausto Coppi Selle San Marco (da regolamento tutti i partecipanti devono indossare lamaglia fornita dall'organizzazione, pena la squalifica), dal momento che ha partecipato all'evento in
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Photos: Le Tour de France –Through the Years - Denver Post
Google News - over 5 years
(AP Photo) Fausto Coppi of Italy leads the pack ahead of Jean Robic of France on his way to win the 10th stage of the Tour de France cycling race from Lausanne to L'Alpe d'Huez, July 4, 1952. Coppi later won the Tour. AP Photo) Cyclist Raphael
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Alberto Contador to face hostile music in France - Herald Sun
Google News - over 5 years
A fourth win in the Tour would give him his seventh grand tour triumph, equalling Armstrong, Miguel Indurain and Fausto Coppi. Only Eddy Merckx (11), Bernard Hinault (10) and Jacques Anquetil (8) have won more. Despite his Giro victory, Contador tried
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Cycling hard and high on a Tour of his own - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
Fausto Coppi summited ahead of the peloton, the main body of riders, when the mountain was first used as a Tour stage finish in 1952. It has been the site of regular battles since, and is perhaps the race's most famous climb. At race pace, any climb is
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Stuart Pearce's missteps show England's coaches need coaching, too - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
To describe cricket's eternal lack of self-awareness as asinine would be to insult a noble four-legged breed. If Fausto Coppi's long limbs and arched back earned him the nickname of the Heron, Juan Mauricio Soler could be called the Praying Mantis
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Fausto Coppi
    FORTIES
  • 1960
    Age 40
    Died on January 2, 1960.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1959
    Age 39
    In December 1959, the president of Burkina Faso, Maurice Yaméogo, invited Coppi, Raphaël Géminiani, Jacques Anquetil, Louison Bobet, Roger Hassenforder and Henry Anglade to ride against local riders and then go hunting.
    More Details Hide Details Géminiani remembered: "I slept in the same room as Coppi in a house infested by mosquitos. I'd got used to them but Coppi hadn't. Well, when I say we 'slept', that's an overstatement. It was like the safari had been brought forward several hours, except that for the moment we were hunting mosquitos. Coppi was swiping at them with a towel. Right then, of course, I had no clue of what the tragic consequences of that night would be. Ten times, twenty times, I told Fausto 'Do what I'm doing and get your head under the sheets; they can't bite you there'". Both caught malaria and fell ill when they got home. Géminiani said: "My temperature got to 41.6 °C... I was delirious and I couldn't stop talking. I imagined or maybe saw people all round but I didn't recognise anyone. The doctor treated me for hepatitis, then for yellow fever, finally for typhoid".
    In 1959, he wasn't a racing cyclist any more.
    More Details Hide Details He was just clinging on tentait de sauver les meubles." Jacques Goddet wrote in an appreciation of Coppi's career in L'Équipe: "We would like to have cried out to him Stop!' And as nobody dared to, destiny took care of it". Raphaël Géminiani said of Coppi's domination: When Fausto won and you wanted to check the time gap to the man in second place, you didn't need a Swiss stopwatch. The bell of the church clock tower would do the job just as well. Paris–Roubaix? Milan–San Remo? Lombardy? We're talking 10 minutes to a quarter of an hour. That's how Fausto Coppi was.
    Pierre Chany said he was first to be dropped each day in the Vuelta a España in 1959.
    More Details Hide Details Criterium organisers frequently cut their races to 45 km to be certain that Coppi could finish, he said. "Physically, he wouldn't have been able to ride even 10km further. He charged himself drugs before every race". Coppi, said Chany, was "a magnificent and grotesque washout of a man, ironical towards himself; nothing except the warmth of simple friendship could penetrate his melancholia. But I'm talking of the end of his career. The last year! In 1959! I'm not talking about the great era.
  • 1954
    Age 34
    Its president, Bartolo Paschetta, wrote on 8 July 1954: "Dear Fausto, yesterday evening St. Peter made it known to me that the news adultery had caused him great pain".
    More Details Hide Details Bruna Ciampolini refused a divorce. To end a marriage was shameful and still illegal in some parts of the country. Coppi was shunned and spectators spat at him. He and Giulia Occhini had a son, Faustino.
  • 1953
    Age 33
    He was also 1953 world road champion.
    More Details Hide Details In 1952 Coppi won on the Alpe d'Huez, which had been included for the first time that year. He attacked six kilometres from the summit to rid himself of the French rider, Jean Robic. Coppi said: "I knew he was no longer there when I couldn't hear his breathing any more or the sound of his tyres on the road behind me". He rode like "a Martian on a bicycle", said Raphaël Géminiani. "He asked my advice about the gears to use, I was in the French team and he in the Italian, but he was a friend and normally my captain in our everyday team, so I could hardly refuse him. I saw a phenomenal rider that day". Coppi won the Tour by 28m 27s and the organiser, Jacques Goddet, had to double the prizes for lower placings to keep other riders interested. It was his last Tour, having ridden three and won two.
    He won the Giro d'Italia five times (1940, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953), the Tour de France twice (1949 and 1952), and the World Championship in 1953.
    More Details Hide Details Other notable results include winning the Giro di Lombardia five times, the Milan–San Remo three times, as well as wins at Paris–Roubaix and La Flèche Wallonne and setting the hour record (45.798 km) in 1942. Coppi was one of five children born to Domenico Coppi and Angiolina Boveri, who married on 29 July 1914. Fausto was the fourth child, born at 5:00 pm on 15 September 1919. His mother wanted to call him Angelo, but his father preferred Fausto. He was named Angelo Fausto but was known most of his life as Fausto.
  • 1951
    Age 31
    Coppi's career declined after the scandal. He had already been hit in 1951 by the death of his younger brother, Serse Coppi, who crashed in a sprint in the Giro del Piemonte and died of a cerebral haemorrhage.
    More Details Hide Details Coppi could never match his old successes.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1949
    Age 29
    Coppi won the 1949 Tour de France by almost half an hour over everyone except Bartali.
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    During the 1949 Giro he left Gino Bartali by 11 minutes between Cuneo and Pinerolo.
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    Twice, 1949 and 1952, Coppi won the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de France in the same year, the first to do so.
    More Details Hide Details He won the Giro five times, a record shared with Alfredo Binda and Eddy Merckx.
  • 1948
    Age 28
    By the 1948 world championship at Valkenburg, South Holland in the Netherlands, both climbed off rather than help the other.
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  • 1946
    Age 26
    In the 1946 Milan–San Remo he attacked with nine others, five kilometres into a race of 292 km.
    More Details Hide Details He dropped the rest on the Turchino climb and won by 14 minutes. He also won Paris–Roubaix and La Flèche Wallonne (1950).
    The veteran writer Pierre Chany said that from 1946 to 1954 Coppi was never once recaught once he had broken away from the rest.
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    In 1946 he resumed racing and achieved remarkable successes which would be exceeded only by Eddy Merckx.
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  • 1943
    Age 23
    Officers favoured him at first to keep him riding his bike, but in March 1943 they sent him to North Africa.
    More Details Hide Details There he was taken prisoner by the British between Mateur and Medjez-el-Bab on 13 April 1943. He was kept in a prisoner of war camp, where he shared plates with the father of Claudio Chiappucci, who rode the Tour in the 1990s. He was given odd jobs to do. The British cyclist Len Levesley said he was astonished to find Coppi giving him a haircut. Levesley, who was on a stretcher with polio, said: "I should think it took me all of a full second to realise who it was. He looked fine, he looked slim, and having been in the desert, he looked tanned. I'd only seen him in cycling magazines but I knew instantly who he was. So he cut away at my hair and I tried to have a conversation with him, but he didn't speak English and I don't speak Italian. But we managed one or two words and I got over to him that I did some club racing. And I gave him a bar of chocolate that I had with me and he was grateful for that and that was the end of it".
  • 1942
    Age 22
    In 1942 he set a world hour record (45.798 km at the Velodromo Vigorelli in Milan) which stood for 14 years until it was broken by Jacques Anquetil in 1956.
    More Details Hide Details His career was then interrupted by the Second World War.
  • 1940
    Age 20
    His first large success was in 1940, winning the Giro d'Italia at the age of 20.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1939
    Age 19
    But at Varzi on 7 May 1939 he won one of the races counting to the season-long national independent championship.
    More Details Hide Details He finished seven minutes clear of the field and won his next race by six minutes.
    Cavanna suggested in 1939 that Coppi should become an independent, a class of semi-professionals who could ride against both amateurs and professionals.
    More Details Hide Details He sent Coppi to the Tour of Tuscany that April with the advice: "Follow Gino Bartali!" He was forced to stop with a broken wheel.
  • 1938
    Age 18
    A regular caller at the butcher's shop in Novi Ligure was a former boxer who had become a masseur, a job he could do after losing his sight, in 1938.
    More Details Hide Details Giuseppe Cavanna was known to friends as Biagio. Coppi met him that year, recommended by another of Cavanna's riders.
    Coppi took a racing licence at the start of 1938 and won his first race, at Castelleto d'Orba, near the butcher's shop.
    More Details Hide Details He won alone, winning an alarm clock.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1927
    Age 7
    Coppi had poor health as a child and showed little interest in school. In 1927 he wrote "I ought to be at school, not riding my bicycle" after skipping lessons to spend the day riding a family bike which he had found in a cellar, rusty and without brake blocks.
    More Details Hide Details He left school at age 13 to work for Domenico Merlani, a butcher in Novi Ligure more widely known as Signor Ettore. Cycling to and from the shop and meeting cyclists who came there interested him in racing. The money to buy a bike came from his uncle, also called Fausto Coppi, and his father. Coppi said: "... uncle was a merchant navy officer on a petrol tanker, and a real cycling fan. He was touched when he heard of my passion for the bike and decided that I deserved a real tool for the job on which I had set my heart, instead of the rusty old crock I was pushing around. I just cried with joy when my kind uncle gave me the 600 lire that were to make my dream come true. I knew from advertisements I had seen in the local papers that for 600 lire I could get a frame built to my measurements in Genoa. Out of my slender savings I took enough for the train fare to Genoa and back, gave my measurements, and handed over the 600 lire. I would have to buy the fittings and tyres from my errand-boy salary. Oh how my legs used to ache at night through climbing all those stairs during the day! But I'm glad I did, because it surely made my legs so strong".
  • 1919
    Born
    Born on September 15, 1919.
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