Fay Wray
Actor
Fay Wray
Fay Wray was a Canadian-American actress most noted for playing the female lead in King Kong. Through an acting career that spanned 57 years, Wray attained international stardom as an actress in horror film roles, leading to many considering her as the first "scream queen". After appearing in minor film roles, Wray gained media attention being selected as one of the "WAMPAS Baby Stars".
Biography
Fay Wray's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Fay Wray from around the web
Friends, family recall Eve Craig for her loves, losses, and legacy - Valley News
Google News - over 5 years
Her remains were interred in a family tomb at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, which is the final resting place of such celebrities and historical figures as Don Adams, Mel Blanc, Arthur Miller, Charlie Chaplin, Cecil B. DeMille, Fay Wray, Iron Eyes
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Know It All - San Mateo Daily Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Actress Fay Wray (1907-2004) appeared in over 100 movies in the 1920s and 30s, but she is most famous for her role as Ann Darrow in “King Kong.” She is the unwitting love interest of the big ape that gets abducted atop of the Empire State Building
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The Full Monticello - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
He's designed yachts, governors' mansions, castles, a royal palace, exclusive resorts, television-show sets, a 15-car train and homes for Hollywood icons (Joan Crawford, Ethel Merman and Fay Wray among them). Lines of eyeglasses, china, potpourri and
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All this drama isn't about students, it's about money - Kansas.com
Google News - over 5 years
And let's be honest here, Texas is the Big 12's King Kong and everybody else is Fay Wray. It's not necessarily an ideal situation, and it caused Nebraska athletic director Tom Osborne to get the Huskers as far away from Austin as possible
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Manhattan Lights
NYTimes - over 5 years
RULES OF CIVILITY By Amor Towles 335 pp. Viking. $26.95. The saying ''May you live in interesting times'' has undeniable resonance for the investment executive-turned-/novelist Amor Towles. In 1989, he was set to go to China for two years to teach. When the Tiananmen Square massacre put an abrupt end to that plan, he headed for Manhattan. On his
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Romantic Mischief in 1930s Manhattan - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
With this snappy period piece, Towles resurrects the cinematic black-and-white Manhattan of the golden age of screwball comedy, gal-pal camaraderie and romantic mischief (think of "Stage Door," "Made for Each Other," "My Man Godfrey" and even Fay Wray
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The Kings of The Swingers - The Film Pilgrim
Google News - over 5 years
Once discovered, the gorilla kidnaps actress Ann Darrow (Fay Wray) and is pursued by her lover through the torturous jungle. Eventually, Kong is captured and taken back as a trophy to New York City. King Kong is a monkey that reflects the greed,
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Harry Redmond - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Originally conceived by Merian C Cooper and the British thriller writer Edgar Wallace as a low-budget B-movie, King Kong became an enormous box-office hit, making a star of its female lead, Fay Wray. A crucial part of the picture's popular appeal lay
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The Making Of 'King Kong': Screams, Score And More - NPR
Google News - over 5 years
There are many things that make the 1933 movie King Kong great — the special effects, the image of the giant ape climbing the Empire State Building, Fay Wray's screams — and the score, composed by Max Steiner. "It's a wonderful score, and of course
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The Chimp Who Became Human - Daily Beast
Google News - over 5 years
It's been almost 80 years since King Kong dangled Fay Wray from the Empire State Building, but once again, simian cinema is all the rage in Hollywood. There's the Kevin James comedy The Zookeeper, featuring a gorilla voiced by Nick Nolte,
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Dating Tips From Friends at the Zoo? Of Courserous - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
But it's hard to completely dislike a movie in which Mr. James makes like Fay Wray, hitching a ride on the back of his gorilla pal, Bernie (voiced by Nick Nolte), as Bernie clambers up a bridge. The bridge scene is the culmination of the buddy part of
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The Far Side of Religion: Notes on the Prophet Gary Larson - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The image of pagans offering a sacrificial human to some god or monster (like Fay Wray to King Kong) comes to mind as we look at caterpillars summoning Professor Crutchfeld with a gong. We see him approaching the terrified, tied-up butterfly and the
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What's On Sunday
NYTimes - over 5 years
9 P.M. (13, 49) POIROT XI: HALLOWE'EN PARTY David Suchet, below, continues his stint as the dapper Belgian supersleuth Hercule Poirot in the last of three new mysteries based on the novels by Agatha Christie and presented by ''Masterpiece Mystery!'' In this installment a universally disliked girl, Joyce Reynolds (Macy Nyman), boasts at a Halloween
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One last try saving historic Pine Bluff Saenger theater - Today's THV
Google News - over 5 years
The Saenger Theater opened back in 1924, playing host to the likes of Will Rogers, Harry Houdini and Actress Fay Wray from King Kong. After a rare tour inside the theater Wednesday, we can tell you it will take a lot more than just a few touch ups to
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MONSTER MASH - Queerty
Google News - over 5 years
Make no mistake, Fay Wray—Perkins is like the King Kong of hate. Here's what Mr. Kong had to say about the fabulous building in his cleverly-titled post “A New York State of Blind”: There was no mistaking the message Friday night when the highest
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"Robot" - A.V. Club DC
Google News - over 5 years
The other obvious influence is King Kong, whose tragic story is echoed in the rise and fall of the misunderstood and all too easily duped K-1 Robot, with the good-hearted Sarah Jane Smith in the Fay Wray role. It's worth noting that it's Elisabeth
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Fay Wray
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2004
    Age 96
    In 2004, Wray was approached by director Peter Jackson to appear in a small cameo for the 2005 remake of King Kong.
    More Details Hide Details She met with Naomi Watts, who was to play the role of Ann Darrow. She politely declined the cameo, and claimed the original "Kong" to be the true "King".
  • 2003
    Age 95
    In January 2003, the 95-year-old Wray appeared at the 2003 Palm Beach International Film Festival to celebrate the Rick McKay documentary film Broadway: The Golden Age, by the Legends Who Were There, where she was also honored with a "Legend in Film" award.
    More Details Hide Details In her later years, she also visited the Empire State Building frequently, once visiting in 1991 as a guest of honor at the building's 60th anniversary, and also in May 2004, which was among her last public appearances. Her final public appearance was at an after-party at the Sardi's restaurant in New York City, following the premiere of the documentary film Broadway: The Golden Age, by the Legends Who Were There. Wray married three times – to writers John Monk Saunders and Robert Riskin and the neurosurgeon Sanford Rothenberg (January 28, 1919 - January 4, 1991). She had three children: Susan Saunders, Victoria Riskin, and Robert Riskin, Jr. She became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1933. In her autobiography On The Other Hand: A Life Story she declared herself a Republican.
  • 1998
    Age 90
    On October 3, 1998, she appeared at the Pine Bluff Film Festival, which showed "The Wedding March" (with live orchestral accompaniment).
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  • 1997
    Age 89
    She was approached by James Cameron to play the part of Rose Dawson Calvert for his 1997 blockbuster Titanic with Kate Winslet to play her younger self, but she turned down the role and the part of Rose was given to Gloria Stuart.
    More Details Hide Details She was a special guest at the 70th Academy Awards, where the show's host, Billy Crystal, introduced her as the "Beauty who charmed the Beast". She was the only 1920s Hollywood actress in attendance that evening.
  • 1991
    Age 83
    In 1991, she was crowned Queen of the Beaux Arts Ball presiding with King Herbert Huncke.
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  • 1988
    Age 80
    In 1988, she published her autobiography, On the Other Hand.
    More Details Hide Details In her later years, Wray continued to make public appearances.
  • 1980
    Age 72
    She ended her acting career in the 1980 made-for-television film, Gideon's Trumpet.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1965
    Age 57
    In 1965, she played voodoo practitioner Mignon Germaine in "The Case of the Fatal Fetish".
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  • 1963
    Age 55
    In 1963, she played Mrs. Brubaker in the episode "You're So Smart, Why Can't You Be Good?" of the NBC medical drama about psychiatry, The Eleventh Hour.
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  • 1961
    Age 53
    Wray appeared in a 1961 episode of The Real McCoys titled "Theatre in the Barn".
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  • 1960
    Age 52
    Another 1960 role was that of Mrs. Staunton, with Gigi Perreau as her daughter, in the episode "Flight from Terror" of the ABC adventure series, The Islanders.
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    In 1960, she appeared as Clara in an episode of 77 Sunset Strip, "Who Killed Cock Robin?".
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  • 1959
    Age 51
    In 1959, Wray was cast as Tula Marsh in the episode "The Second Happiest Day" of the CBS anthology series Playhouse 90.
    More Details Hide Details Other roles around this time were in the episodes "Dip in the Pool" and "The Morning After" of CBS's Alfred Hitchcock Presents.
    In 1959, she portrayed murder victim Lorna Thomas in "The Case of the Watery Witness".
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  • 1958
    Age 50
    Wray appeared in three episodes of CBS's courtroom drama Perry Mason, the first of which was "The Case Of The Prodigal Parent" (episode 1-36) aired June 7, 1958.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1955
    Age 47
    In 1955, Wray appeared with fellow WAPMAS Baby Star, Joan Crawford in Queen Bee.
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  • 1953
    Age 45
    Wray was cast in the 1953-54 ABC situation comedy, The Pride of the Family, as Catherine Morrison.
    More Details Hide Details Paul Hartman played her husband, Albie Morrison. Natalie Wood and Robert Hyatt played their children, Ann and Junior Morrison, respectively.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1942
    Age 34
    She retired from acting in 1942 after her second marriage but due to financial exigencies soon resumed her acting career, and over the next three decades, Wray appeared in several film roles and also frequently on television.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1928
    Age 20
    The following year, Wray was signed to a contract with Paramount Pictures. In 1928, director Erich von Stroheim cast her as the main female lead in his film The Wedding March, released by Paramount.
    More Details Hide Details While the film was noted for its high budget and production values, it was a financial failure, but gave Wray her first lead role. Wray stayed with Paramount to make more than a dozen films and to make the transition from silent films to "talkie" films. After leaving Paramount, Wray signed to various film companies. Under these deals, Wray was cast in various horror films, including Doctor X. However, her greatest known films were produced under her deal with RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. Her first film under RKO was The Most Dangerous Game (1932), co-starring Joel McCrea and shot at night on the same jungle sets that were being used for King Kong during the day, with the leads from both films, Wray and Robert Armstrong, appearing in both movies. The Most Dangerous Game was followed by Wray's most memorable film, King Kong. According to Wray, Jean Harlow had been RKO's original choice, but because MGM put Harlow under exclusive contract during the preproduction phase of the film, she became unavailable and Wray was approached by director Merian C. Cooper to play the role of Ann Darrow, the blonde captive of King Kong. Wray was paid $10,000 to play the role. The film was a commercial success. Wray was reportedly proud that the film saved RKO from bankruptcy. Wray's role would become the one with which she would be most associated.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1926
    Age 18
    In 1926, the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers selected Wray as one of the "WAMPAS Baby Stars", a group of women whom they believed to be on the threshold of movie stardom.
    More Details Hide Details She was at the time under contract to Universal Studios, mostly co-starring in low-budget Westerns opposite Buck Jones.
  • 1923
    Age 15
    In 1923, Wray appeared in her first film at the age of 16, when she landed a role in a short historical film sponsored by a local newspaper.
    More Details Hide Details In the 1920s, Wray landed a major role in the silent film The Coast Patrol (1925), as well as uncredited bit parts at the Hal Roach Studios.
  • 1919
    Age 11
    In 1919, the Wray family returned to Salt Lake City, and then relocated to Hollywood, where Fay attended Hollywood High School.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1912
    Age 4
    Her family returned to the United States a few years after she was born; they moved to Salt Lake City in 1912 and moved to Lark, Utah in 1914.
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  • 1907
    Born
    Born on September 15, 1907.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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