Faye Emerson
American actor
Faye Emerson
Faye Margaret Emerson was an American film actress and television interviewer known as "The First Lady of Television". Beginning in 1941, she acted in many Warner Brothers films. In 1944, she played one of her more memorable roles as Zachary Scott's former wife in The Mask of Dimitrios. She was born to Lawrence and Emma (Smythe) in the tiny community of Elizabeth in Allen Parish in southwestern Louisiana.
Biography
Faye Emerson's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Faye Emerson
News
News abour Faye Emerson from around the web
Citrus brought stars and national publicity - News Chief
Google News - over 5 years
"The Garry Moore Show" and "I've Got a Secret," with Moore as host, were firsts, staged in the Lake Silver Amphitheatre with stars such as Jayne Meadows, Faye Emerson, Henry Morgan, Bill Cullen, Durwood Kirby and Rocky Graziani. The year was 1957
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Google News article
Hyde Park movie theater, drive-in have illustrious history - Poughkeepsie Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Opening night at the 500-seat single-screen showplace was a major event in the community with motion picture and television actress Faye Emerson joining the festivities. Emerson was Roosevelt's third wife and lived with him at Top Cottage
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Google News article
Today's Birthdays - Sports Radio ESPN 1420
Google News - over 5 years
Actress Faye Emerson. (Born 1917) She appeared in such films as "Destination: Tokyo" and "Uncertain Glory." Actress Pamela Brown. (Born 1917) She appeared in several films including "Wuthering Heights" and "Cleopatra." Actor Craig Stevens
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Google News article
OFFBEAT: Happy 70th anniversary to commercial TV with nod to Carol Burnett - nwitimes.com
Google News - over 5 years
While none of the late greats of TV like "Mr. Television" Milton "Uncle Milty" Berle, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, Arthur Godfrey, Faye Emerson, Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy and Arlene Francis are here today to mark the occasion, fortunately,
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Google News article
Van Johnson, 92, Dies; Affable Matinee Idol
NYTimes - about 8 years
Van Johnson, one of the last surviving matinee idols of Hollywood's golden age, an actor whose affable charm and boyish good looks helped make him a star during World War II, died on Friday in Nyack, N.Y. He was 92. His death, at the Tappan Zee Manor assisted-living facility, was announced by a spokesman, Daniel Demello. Mr. Johnson was the boy
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ON LANGUAGE; Cleavage Umbrage
NYTimes - over 9 years
Cleavage, a word once associated with a deep rift in Republican ranks, has now appeared within the Democratic Party. ''Good riddance to the Democratic Leadership Council'' was the incendiary subhead of an article on the Op-Ed page of The Times two weeks ago. The author, Noam Scheiber, is senior editor of The New Republic, once a media bastion of
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Isabel Bigley, 80, Tony-Winning 'Guys and Dolls' Star, Dies
NYTimes - over 10 years
Isabel Bigley, who won a Tony award in 1951 playing Sarah Brown, the Salvation Army missionary who falls in love with a handsome gambler in the raucous Broadway hit ''Guys and Dolls,'' died Saturday in Los Angeles. She was 80, and lived in Los Angeles and Rancho Mirage, Calif. The cause was pulmonary disease, her son Lawrence Barnett Jr. said. With
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NYTimes article
Skitch Henderson, 87, 'Tonight' Show Bandleader, Dies
NYTimes - over 11 years
Skitch Henderson, the conductor, pianist and radio and television entertainer who provided music and repartee for the ''Tonight'' show in the 1950's and 60's and who founded and led the New York Pops, died on Tuesday at his home in New Milford, Conn. He was 87. His death was announced by James M. Johnson, executive director of the Pops. With his
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THE GUIDE
NYTimes - almost 12 years
Best Bet: Being Ella Carolyn Brown, a singer from Amityville, has been a devoted Ella Fitzgerald fan, she said, ever since ''I was a child and my grandma sang her songs all the time.'' These days, Ms. Brown has a chance to portray her idol, appearing in ''Home With Ella Fitzgerald,'' at the Educational and Cultural Center of the Ward Melville
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A Pied-à-Terre Designed By a President; F. D. R. Never Slept Here, But Entertained Dignitaries And Enjoyed Rendezvous
NYTimes - over 15 years
Franklin Delano Roosevelt was more than the nation's longest-serving president and wartime leader, social reformer, sailor, fisherman, dog lover and stamp collector in chief. He was also a budding architect in the tradition of Thomas Jefferson. For more than two years in the late 1930's, while grappling with the Depression and Fascist aggression,
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Gil Fates, 86, a TV Producer Of Shows Like 'What's My Line?'
NYTimes - almost 17 years
Gil Fates, an executive producer of some of the leading television game and panel shows of the 1950's and 60's, died on May 1 at Beth Israel Medical Center in Manhattan. He was 86 and lived in Greenwich, Conn. In more than 35 years with Goodson-Todman Productions, Mr. Fates helped to create programs like ''Beat the Clock,'' ''Winner Take All,''
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Downhill From Honor to Derision
NYTimes - about 18 years
MY PILGRIM'S PROGRESS Media Studies, 1950-1998 By George W. S. Trow 279 pages. Pantheon. $24. The first thing to note about George W. S. Trow's new book is that, as with his best-known previous work, the cult classic ''Within the Context of No Context,'' there is something interesting on every page and something brilliant on many of them. In ''My
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Michael Dewell, 62, a Producer And Translator of Stage Classics
NYTimes - almost 23 years
Michael Dewell, a producer, writer and translator who mounted theatrical classics on tour and on Broadway, died on Friday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 62. The cause was lung cancer, said Mary Bryant, a friend. Mr. Dewell was a co-founder of the National Repertory Theater, which received a Tony Award in 1965 for its work in producing classical
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Antiquities From Not So Long Ago
NYTimes - over 23 years
THE cultural attic has been emptied at the American Museum of the Moving Image. This quietly spectacular five-year-old museum, part of the Kaufman-Astoria Studios in Queens, has filled its capacious third-floor gallery with hundreds of pieces of historical video and film equipment that conjure memories of a family's early television set or
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Arthur Milford, 89, Film Editor, Is Dead; Winner of 2 Oscars
NYTimes - about 25 years
Arthur Eugene Milford, a film editor who won Academy Awards for editing Frank Capra's "Lost Horizon" (1937) and Elia Kazan's "On the Waterfront" (1954), died on Dec. 23 at Santa Monica Hospital in California. He was 89 years old. He died of pneumonia, said his wife, Dorothy. Mr. Milford was born in Lamar, Colo., and entered silent films as a
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Robert Q. Lewis, 71, Comedian And TV Host and Panelist, Dies
NYTimes - about 25 years
Robert Q. Lewis, a radio comedian, television host and panelist who was known as much for his fey wit as his trademark horn-rimmed glasses, died on Wednesday at Century City Hospital in Los Angeles. He was 71 years old. He died of emphysema, said Peggy Bigelow, a friend. Mr. Lewis was perhaps best known for his frequent guest-host appearances on
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'If I Stood Up Earlier...'
NYTimes - about 26 years
The dark terror of the television lacklisting days (1950-1955) now seems far off, and most of us who were caught in the middle of the storm have developed fuzzy memories -- perhaps deliberately. And we dig into our consciences to examine the part we played in that shameful era. Like the French after the liberation, we all claim to have been part of
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Elliott Roosevelt, General and Author, Dies at 80
NYTimes - over 26 years
Elliott Roosevelt, a World War II Air Corps general, a breeder of Arabian horses and an author whose works included a series of mystery novels that cast his mother, the First Lady, as an amateur detective, died yesterday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 80 years old. Mr. Roosevelt died of congestive heart failure, his wife, the former
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NYTimes article
Review/Television; Late-Night Chitchat Additions: Pat Sajak and Arsenio Hall
NYTimes - about 28 years
LEAD: One show is affably low-key, in the mode of Johnny Carson and easy-listening radio. One show is affably low-key, in the mode of Johnny Carson and easy-listening radio. The other program is glitzy, aggressively friendly, hyperkinetic. Take your choice. The formats are the latest entries in television's late-night talk shows. The Carson
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Faye Emerson
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1983
    Age 65
    Emerson moved to Spain and spent the rest of her life in seclusion. She died in 1983, aged 65, from stomach cancer in Deià, Majorca.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1957
    Age 39
    Next year, she married band leader and conductor Lyle "Skitch" Henderson in the same town; the couple divorced in 1957 in Acapulco, Mexico.
    More Details Hide Details Former brother-in-law James Roosevelt wrote that "after an incident involving some teen-age girls he (Skitch) was dropped from Johnny Carson's Tonight TV show and his career went into eclipse. Faye's marriage to Skitch hit the skids. She didn't have much luck in her married life, but she endures, and we think of her fondly."
  • 1950
    Age 32
    In January 1950, Faye obtained a divorce in Cuernavaca, Mexico.
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  • 1948
    Age 30
    In December 1948, Faye Emerson slit her wrists and was briefly hospitalized.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1947
    Age 29
    The marriage began breaking up by 1947.
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  • 1944
    Age 26
    In December 1944, Hughes and Meyer provided the funding and airplanes for Faye and Elliott's marriage at the rim of the Grand Canyon.
    More Details Hide Details When Elliott went back to Europe, he named his reconnaissance aircraft "My Faye". After some months in Beverly Hills in 1945, the couple resided with Eleanor Roosevelt at Hyde Park, New York. They had no children.
  • 1943
    Age 25
    However, Faye's activities in the movie industry were not conducive to a stable marriage, and though it produced one son, William Crawford, Jr., the marriage was over by the time Faye met President Franklin D. Roosevelt's son, Colonel Elliott Roosevelt, in August 1943.
    More Details Hide Details Howard Hughes was instrumental in bringing the two together when Colonel Roosevelt visited the Hughes Aircraft Company to evaluate the proposed Hughes XF-11. Though Elliott was married, Faye and he linked up, strongly urged on by the generous efforts of Hughes and his social facilitator, Johnny Meyer. Emerson later asserted that despite her doubts, Hughes urged her to advance the relationship, and she could not defy him.
  • 1942
    Age 24
    A film she made with Van Johnson in 1942, Murder in the Big House, was re-released under a new title later in the decade after Emerson began to make a name for herself in a new medium, television.
    More Details Hide Details In 1948, she made a move to TV and began acting in various anthology series, including The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre, The Philco Television Playhouse, and Goodyear Television Playhouse. She served as host for several short-lived talk shows and musical/variety shows, including Paris Cavalcade of Fashions (1948) and The Faye Emerson Show (CBS, 1950). Although The Faye Emerson Show lasted only one season, it gave her wide exposure because her time slot immediately followed the CBS Evening News and alternated weeknights with the popular The Perry Como Show. According to author Gabe Essoe in The Book of TV Lists, on one of the show's segments, her low-cut gown slipped and "she exposed her ample self coast to coast." The show was broadcast from a studio CBS built on the sixth floor of the Stork Club building. The studio, a complete replica of the Stork Club's Cub Room, was built for The Stork Club, also seen on CBS beginning in 1950.
  • 1940
    Age 22
    Emerson was born to Lawrence and Emma (née Smythe) Emerson in the tiny community of Elizabeth, Louisiana. She moved with her mother to San Diego before the World War II, where she took up acting and by 1940 was a Hollywood starlet.
    More Details Hide Details Emerson appeared in a number of crime dramas, co-starring with Zachary Scott in three: The Mask of Dimitrios (1944), Danger Signal (1945) and Guilty Bystander (1950). She co-starred with John Garfield in the film noir Nobody Lives Forever and opposite Jane Wyman in another mystery, Crime by Night.
  • 1938
    Age 20
    Emerson married her first husband, William Crawford, a naval aviator, in 1938.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1917
    Born
    Born on July 8, 1917.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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