Floyd Abrams
Attorney
Floyd Abrams
Floyd Abrams is an American attorney at Cahill Gordon & Reindel. He is an expert on constitutional law, and many arguments in the briefs he has written before the United States Supreme Court have been adopted as United States Constitutional interpretative law as it relates to the First Amendment and free speech. He is the William J. Brennan Jr. Visiting Professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University.
Biography
Floyd Abrams's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Floyd Abrams from around the web
Floyd Abrams, America's free speaker
LATimes - over 3 years
He's blazed a trail for freedom of the press from the Pentagon Papers case to protecting reporters' sources. Where there's smoke arising from a free-speech matter, you're likely to find the fiery attorney Floyd Abrams. He's blazed a trail for freedom of the press from the Pentagon Papers case to protecting reporters' sources. He's just as incendiary when he's fighting forced warning labels on cigarettes and championing the Citizens United court decision. Abrams' memoir, " Friend of the Court ," arrives as news media and government are again at loggerheads over reporters' phone records and revelations-by-leak of widespread domestic surveillance — all burning issues for him.
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LATimes article
U.S. Attorney General Infringing on 1st Amendment?
Fox Business News - over 3 years
‘Friend of the Court’ author Floyd Abrams on the Department of Justice scandal.
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Fox Business News article
The Lead: Classified leaks a problem?
CNN - over 3 years
First Amendment expert Floyd Abrams says Justice Department overstepped its bounds in pursuing Fox reporter James Rosen.
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CNN article
Why the underwear-bomber leak infuriated the Obama administration
Reuters Canada - almost 4 years
Journalists gasp and growl whenever prosecutors issue lawful subpoenas ordering them to divulge their confidential sources or to turn over potential evidence, such as notes, video outtakes or other records. It’s an attack on the First Amendment, It’s an attack on the First Amendment, It’s an attack on the First Amendment, journalists and their lawyers chant. Those chants were heard this week, as it was revealed that Department of Justice prosecutors had seized two months’ worth of records from 20 office, home and cell phone lines used by Associated Press journalists in their investigation into the Yemen underwear-bomber leaks. First Amendment radicals — I count myself among them — resist any and all such intrusions: You can’t very well have a free press if every unpublished act of journalism can be co-opted by cops, prosecutors and defense attorneys. First Amendment attorney Floyd Abrams speaks for most journalists when he denounces the “breathtaking scope” of the AP subpoenas. But ...
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Reuters Canada article
Judith Miller, top attorney weigh in on Fox News' First Amendment fight
Fox News - almost 4 years
Former New York Times reporter Judith Miller spent 85 days in jail in 2005 protecting the identity of her Bush administration source, who was involved in the controversial disclosure of a CIA employee's identity. Her attorney during the legal battle was Floyd Abrams, known as one of the top First Amendment lawyers in the country. Miller and Abrams both stopped by "American Live w/Megyn Kelly" on Friday to discuss the case of FoxNews.com reporter Jana Winter, who could go to jail for refusing to reveal her source for an exclusive story in the aftermath of the July 20, 2012, movie theater massacre in Aurora, Colo. A Colorado judge is expected to decide Wednesday whether Winter will be called to testify. Click for full coverage of Fox News' First Amendment fight.
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Fox News article
Well, So Much For Those Graphic Cigarette Warning Labels
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
RICHMOND, Va. — The U.S. government is abandoning a legal battle to require that cigarette packs carry a set of large and often macabre warning labels depicting the dangers of smoking and encouraging smokers to quit. Instead, the Food and Drug Administration will go back to the drawing board and create labels to replace those that included images of diseased lungs and the sewn-up corpse of a smoker, according to a letter from Attorney General Eric Holder obtained by The Associated Press. The government had until Monday to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review an appeals court decision upholding a ruling that the requirement violated First Amendment free speech protections. "In light of these circumstances, the Solicitor General has determined ... not to seek Supreme Court review of the First Amendment issues at the present time," Holder wrote in a Friday letter to House Speaker John Boehner notifying him of the decision. Some of the nation's largest tobacco comp ...
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Huffington Post article
Ira Glasser: Feinstein, Levin and McCain on the Wrong Side of Free Speech
Huffington Post - about 4 years
On Dec. 19, 2012, three United States Senators -- Dianne Feinstein, writing officially as the Chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Carl Levin, as Chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee and John McCain, as the Ranking Member of the Senate Armed Services Committee -- wrote an extraordinary letter to Sony Pictures, quarreling with the way Sony's film Zero Dark Thirty portrayed the role of torture in eliciting useful information in the pursuit of Osama bin Laden, and asking the filmmakers to consider changing their film to conform to the three Senators viewpoint. Today, 28 defenders of free speech and the First Amendment, which bars Congress, and government generally, from coercing or intimidating citizens to conform their opinions and views to those that the government prefers, wrote to every Senator and to the leaders of the House of Representatives, to protest what the three Senators did. I was among those who signed the letter. Also among the signator ...
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Huffington Post article
The case for torture warrants - Reuters Blogs (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
In my debates with two prominent civil libertarians, Floyd Abrams and Harvey Silverglate, both have acknowledged that they would want nonlethal torture to be used if it could prevent thousands of deaths, but they did not want torture to be officially
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Google News article
Flash Mob Violence and the Constitution - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
When large numbers of San Francisco residents, alerted by cellphone text messaging, appeared at Justin Herman Plaza on Valentine's Day in 2006 to engage in a joyous public pillow fight, they began a yearly tradition that is regretted
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Google News article
Is Glitter Bombing an Assault? It's a Matter of Degree, Floyd Abrams Says - ABA Journal
Google News - over 5 years
The Times consulted First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams. who said the issue is all a matter of degree. “Touching someone's body can be criminal,” he said in an email. “But it's awfully unlikely that there would be a prosecution if it's just a bit of
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Google News article
Glittering Rage - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
“I don't think you'd get much disagreement that like so much else in the law, it's all a matter of degree,” the First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams said in an e-mail. “Touching someone's body can be criminal. But it's awfully unlikely that there would
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Google News article
LETTERS; On Anti-Semitism and the Mideast
NYTimes - over 5 years
To the Editor: Re ''Jews in a Whisper'' (column, Aug. 21): Roger Cohen's acute depiction of the perpetuation of British anti-Semitism recalls the description of it in ''Trials of the Diaspora,'' Anthony Julius's epic study of the topic. ''It is not Jew-hatred that we must write of,'' Mr. Julius concludes, ''but Jew-distrust ... it is a story of
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NYTimes article
Big tobacco's argument is all smoke and mirrors - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Their attorney, Floyd Abrams, maintains it violates the right to free speech to require these makers of a lawful product to essentially urge the public not to buy it. The size of the government warning labels, with images such as a man blowing smoke
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Google News article
Big Tobacco Sues FDA To Block Graphic Pictures, Coolness On Packaging - Gothamist
Google News - over 5 years
Attorney for the plaintiffs, the esteemed Floyd Abrams, tells CNN, "We think it violates the First Amendment for the government to require people who purchase a lawful product to essentially urge prospective purchases not to buy it
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Google News article
Former Gazette reporter, political consultant Milam dies - Charleston Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Then-prosecutor Cletis Hanley appealed to the US Supreme Court, where famed First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams won a second victory for the newspaper. Ever since, US news media have been free to identify accused juveniles, although West Virginia law
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Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Floyd Abrams
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2005
    Age 68
    In his 2005 book Speaking Freely, he outlines his knowledge of and perspective on these influential cases (listed in the main article above).
    More Details Hide Details Abrams said these cases showcase the work that has been done on free speech in the United States. Fellow Supreme Court attorney Lee Levine, in a book review, wrote that "the modern history of the freedom of the press in this country is intimately associated with the career and work of Floyd Abrams." His career matured in the late 1960s, right after the Supreme Court decided New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (1964). He has worked on the Pentagon Papers and Branzburg v. Hayes (1972), to Landmark Communications v. Virginia (1978) and Smith v. Daily Mail Publishing Co. (1979), to Nebraska Press Association v. Stuart (1976). He has defended numerous clients, including the Brooklyn Museum of Art from Rudolph Giuliani over the Sensation exhibition, NBC from Wayne Newton, and Al Franken from a trademark lawsuit brought by Fox News Channel over the use of the phrase "Fair and Balanced" in the title of his book. He is currently representing five tobacco companies including R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and Lorillard Tobacco in their lawsuit against the Food and Drug Administration over graphic warning labels on cigarette packs, contending that requiring graphic warning labels on a lawful product cannot withstand constitutional scrutiny. The Association of National Advertisers and the American Advertising Federation have also filed a brief in the suit. In August 2012, in a 2-1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., upheld a lower court ruling that the federal government's warning labels violated the First Amendment.
  • FORTIES
  • 1981
    Age 44
    He was also a Visiting Lecturer at Columbia Law School from 1981-85.
    More Details Hide Details Abrams appearance before the Supreme Court as an advocate of the First Amendment has put him in a class of prominent and still-working legal scholars who have shaped American understanding of their fundamental rights under the United States Constitution.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1974
    Age 37
    He returned to Yale as a Visiting Lecturer from 1974 to 1980, and again from 1986-89.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1956
    Age 19
    Abrams earned his undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 1956, and his Juris Doctor from Yale Law School in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details He lives in New York City with wife Efrat. Together they have a son, Dan Abrams of ABC, and a daughter, Judge Ronnie Abrams of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He is a member of the Constitution Project's Liberty and Security Committee and a patron of the Media Legal Defence Initiative. From 1961 to 1963, Abrams clerked for Judge Paul Leahy of the United States District Court for the District of Delaware.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1936
    Born
    Born on July 9, 1936.
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