Francis Ford Coppola
Director, producer, screenwriter
Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola is an American film director, producer and screenwriter. He is widely acclaimed as one of Hollywood's most innovative and influential film directors. He epitomized the group of filmmakers known as the New Hollywood, that includes George Lucas, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Robert Altman, Woody Allen, William Friedkin, Peter Bogdanovich, and Brian De Palma who emerged in the early 1970s with unconventional ideas that challenged contemporary film-making.
Biography
Francis Ford Coppola's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Francis Ford Coppola from around the web
Francis Ford Coppola announces 'Apocalypse Now' video game
Yahoo News - 26 days
Classic war film "Apocalypse Now" is getting the video game treatment nearly 40 years on from its theatrical release, proposing "an immersive, psychedelic horror" rather than the usual trigger-happy approach interactive depictions of armed conflict. "I've been watching video games turn into a powerful, meaningful way to tell stories," film director Francis Ford Coppola explains in a pitch video. "A cross-disciplinary team of AAA game developers, motion picture professionals and Interactive creatives are coming together to create a truly unique experience," the pitch explains.
Article Link:
Yahoo News article
What Can An Artist Contribute To A Polarized Political Climate?
Huffington Post - about 1 month
I normally write something for the Huffington Post at least once a month, but I admit that even before the actual election, I began to have a bit of writer's block, which only intensified with the surprise outcome on November 8th. I wasn't sure whether to write about feeling heartbroken and angry, or to attempt to find some Kumbaya spirit and consider ways to bring everyone together using art and music as therapy. I am essentially an optimist, and in most everything I write, I attempt to find some element of hopefulness. I also pride myself on being someone who actually enjoys helping people to find common ground, and using my skills as a writer to negotiate opposing sides. However. This is a toughie. My general practice when something upsets me is to let my mind untangle for a time until words come out that may make sense of my anger and frustration to me and hopefully to others. But especially after the election, the words just weren't coming. I couldn't find the sense in what hap ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
To Make 'The Godfather' His Way, Francis Ford Coppola Waged A Studio Battle
NPR - about 2 months
Coppola was 29 years old when he signed on to direct a film. "I was young and had no power," he says, "so [the studio] figured they could just boss me around." Originally broadcast Nov. 16, 2016.
Article Link:
NPR article
How The Hell Does Kevin's Dad Make So Much Money In 'Home Alone'?
Huffington Post - 2 months
BY ALEX SIQUIG There are certain mysteries that have confounded humans for generations. The Bermuda Triangle. The underwater kingdom of Atlantis. The Voynich Manuscript. Magnets. The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser. And of course, just how the fuck could the dad from Home Alone afford such an insanely luxurious house and a trip for a dozen people (many of them in first class!) to Paris and then Miami on back to back Christmases? The riddle of Peter McCallister’s wealth has reached the attention of none other than LeBron James, who was apparently discussing the nuances of the matter with Kevin Love and Maverick Carter. When the Chosen One feels the moral imperative to bestow his Chosen thoughts to the discourse of the mythology and minutia of the extended Home Alone universe, it’s time to take notice. Who is Peter McCallister and why is he so rich? First, let us turn our attention to the family unit that Peter, as a traditional bland Midwestern pater familias, ostensibly presides over. He is ...
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Huffington Post article
Fresh Air Weekend: Francis Ford Coppola; Casey Affleck
NPR - 3 months
Coppola was 29 years old when he signed on to direct a The Godfather. He battled the studio in order to make the movie his way. Affleck discusses his latest film, Manchester by the Sea.
Article Link:
NPR article
To Make 'The Godfather' His Way, Francis Ford Coppola Waged A Studio Battle
NPR - 3 months
Coppola was 29 years old when he signed on to direct a film. "I was young and had no power," he says, "so [the studio] figured they could just boss me around." But the young director fought back.
Article Link:
NPR article
Looking Back on the Making of ‘The Godfather’ With Francis Ford Coppola
NYTimes - 3 months
Scribbled notes by the director on the original novel and the subsequent screenplay have been turned into a coffee table book.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Donald Trump, New Moves on National Security, and One of Our Oddest Veterans Day Weekends
Huffington Post - 3 months
Is America in eclipse? After a strange Veterans Day weekend, it is decidedly unclear. As I feared for more than a year, a deeply troubled and profoundly perturbed America has fallen through the looking glass into Trumplandia. How different will America be under President Donald Trump? It may be quite a lot, all the way into the fascism that Trump so obviously flirted with throughout his campaign. Or it may be not so much, since Trump seems motivated more by an ethic of success than any coherent ideology. And then there is his erratic nature to consider. As I wrote repeatedly during the campaign, it was Trump's own all too frequently intemperate style that kept him from what could have been a truly substantial victory over a very vulnerable Hillary Clinton. That's why I rated the race as up in the air in my final pre-election column, just as I did all the times when Hillary seemed to have a very large lead. The opportunity for a Trump victory was always obvious; what was not at all ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Musician finds benefactor in personalized 'Dreamland'
LATimes - 3 months
Actor/musician Robert Schwartzman gets into the family business with his directorial debut, “Dreamland,” joining his uncle Francis Ford Coppola and his cousins Sofia and Roman Coppola in making his own stylish, deeply personal art-film. Schwartzman’s work isn’t as inspired as the best of his relatives’,...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Francis Ford Coppola
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 71
    On 11 April 2011, Coppola acquired the iconic Inglenook trademark paying more, he said, for the trademark than he did for the entire estate and announced that the estate would once again be known by its historic original name, Inglenook.
    More Details Hide Details Its grapes are now entirely organically grown and its Inglenook Chablis is one of the five most widely selling wines in US restaurants. George Altamura, a real estate developer announced in 2003 that he had partnered with several people, including Francis Ford Coppola, in a project to restore the Uptown Theater in downtown Napa, California in order to create a live entertainment venue. Coppola is also the owner of Francis Ford Coppola Presents, a lifestyle brand under which he markets goods from companies he owns or controls. It includes films and videos, resorts, cafes, a literary magazine, a line of pastas and pasta sauces called Mammarella Foods and a winery. The Francis Ford Coppola Winery near Geyserville, California, located on the former Chateau Souverain Winery, where he has opened a family-friendly facility, is influenced by the idea of the Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen, with swimming pools, bocce courts and a restaurant.
  • 2009
    Age 69
    In 2009, Coppola released Tetro.
    More Details Hide Details It was "set in Argentina, with the reunion of two brothers. The story follows the rivalries born out of creative differences passed down through generations of an artistic Italian immigrant family." The film received generally positive reviews from critics. On Metacritic, the film has an average metascore of 63% based on 19 reviews. Rotten Tomatoes reported that 68% of critics gave positive reviews based on 71 reviews with an average score of 5.6/10. Overall, the Rotten Tomatoes consensus was: "A complex meditation on family dynamics, Tetros arresting visuals and emotional core compensate for its uneven narrative." Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film 3 stars, praising the film for being "boldly operatic, involving family drama, secrets, generations at war, melodrama, romance and violence". Ebert also praised Vincent Gallo's performance and claimed that Alden Ehrenreich is "the new Leonardo DiCaprio". Todd McCarthy of Variety gave the film a B+ judging that "when Coppola finds creative nirvana, he frequently has trouble delivering the full goods." Richard Corliss of TIME gave the film a mixed review, praising Ehrenreich's performance, but claiming Coppola "has made a movie in which plenty happens, but nothing rings true." It has made $2,636,774 worldwide, against a budget of $5,000,000.
  • 2007
    Age 67
    After a 10-year hiatus, Coppola returned to film direction with Youth Without Youth in 2007, based on the novella of the same name by Romanian author Mircea Eliade.
    More Details Hide Details The film was poorly reviewed, currently holding a 30% 'rotten' rating on Rotten Tomatoes. It was made for about $19 million and was given a limited release, only managing $2,624,759 at the box-office. As a result, Coppola announced his plans to produce his own films in order to avoid the marketing input that goes into most films that results in trying to make films appeal to too wide an audience.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1998
    Age 58
    Even though Sagan was shown to have violated some of the terms of the agreement, the case was dismissed in February 1998 because Coppola had waited too long to file suit.
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  • 1996
    Age 56
    Coppola was the jury president at the 1996 Cannes Film Festival and he also took part as a special guest at the 46th International Thessaloniki Film Festival in Greece.
    More Details Hide Details Over the years, Coppola has given contributions to several candidates of the Democratic Party, including Mike Thompson and Nancy Pelosi for the U.S. House of Representatives and Barbara Boxer and Alan Cranston for the U.S. Senate. For quite some time, he had been planning to direct an epic movie named Megalopolis, a story about the aftermath and reconstruction of New York City after a mega-disaster, but after the city was hit by the real life disaster of September 11, the project was suddenly seen as being too sensitive. In 2007 he stated that "I have abandoned that as of now. I plan to begin a process of making one personal movie after another and if something leads me back to look at that, which I'm sure it might, I'll see what makes sense to me."
    During the filming of Contact on December 28, 1996, Coppola filed a lawsuit against Carl Sagan and Warner Bros.
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  • 1991
    Age 51
    But, in mid-1991, Coppola and Warners came to disagreement over the compensation to be paid to Coppola for his directing services on Pinocchio.
    More Details Hide Details The parties deferred this issue and finally a settlement was reached in 1998, when the jurors in the resultant court case awarded Coppola $20 million as compensation for losing the Pinocchio film project. However, they also awarded him a further $60 million in punitive damages on top, stemming from his charges that Warner Bros. sabotaged his intended version. This is the largest civil financial verdict ever against a Hollywood studio.
    In the late 1980s, Coppola started considering concepts for a motion picture based upon the 19th century novel The Adventures of Pinocchio and in 1991, Coppola and Warner Bros. began discussing the project as well as two others involving the life of J.
    More Details Hide Details Edgar Hoover and the children's novel The Secret Garden. These discussions led to negotiations for Coppola to both produce and direct the Pinocchio project for Warners, as well as The Secret Garden (which was made in 1993 and produced by American Zoetrope, but directed by Agnieszka Holland) and Hoover, which never came to fruition. (A film was eventually to be made by Clint Eastwood in 2011 as J. Edgar, which was distributed by Warners.)
  • 1990
    Age 50
    In 1990, he released the third and final chapter of The Godfather series: The Godfather Part III.
    More Details Hide Details While not as critically acclaimed as the first two films, it was still a box office success, earning a revenue of $136 million against a budget of $54 million. Some reviewers criticized the casting of Coppola's daughter Sofia, who had stepped into the leading role of Mary Corleone which had been abandoned by Winona Ryder just as filming began. Despite this, The Godfather Part III went on to gather 7 Academy Award nominations, including Best Director and Best Picture. The film failed to win any of these awards, the only film in the trilogy not to do so. In 1992, Coppola directed and produced Bram Stoker's Dracula. Adapted from Bram Stoker's novel, it was intended to be more faithful to the book than previous film adaptations. Coppola cast Gary Oldman in the film's title role, with Keanu Reeves, Winona Ryder and Anthony Hopkins in supporting roles. The movie became a box-office hit, grossing $82,522,790 domestically, making it the 15th highest-grossing film of the year. It fared even better overseas grossing $133,339,902 for a total worldwide gross of $215,862,692 against a budget of $40 million, making it the 9th highest-grossing film of the year worldwide. The film won Academy Awards for Costume Design, Makeup and Sound Editing.
  • FORTIES
  • 1989
    Age 49
    In 1989 Coppola teamed up with fellow Oscar-winning directors Martin Scorsese and Woody Allen for an anthology film called New York Stories.
    More Details Hide Details Coppola directed the Life Without Zoë segment, starring his sister Talia Shire and also co-wrote the film with his daughter Sofia Coppola. Life Without Zoë was mostly panned by critics and was generally considered the segment that brought the film's overall quality down. Hal Hinson of The Washington Post wrote a particularly scathing review, stating that "It's impossible to know what Francis Coppola's Life Without Zoë is. Co-written with his daughter Sofia, the film is a mystifying embarrassment; it's by far the director's worst work yet."
  • 1986
    Age 46
    In 1986 Coppola released the comedy Peggy Sue Got Married starring Kathleen Turner, Coppola's nephew Nicolas Cage and Jim Carrey.
    More Details Hide Details Much like The Outsiders and Rumble Fish, Peggy Sue Got Married centered around teenage youth. The film earned Coppola positive feedback and provided Kathleen Turner her first and only Oscar nomination. It was the first box-office success for Coppola since Apocalypse Now and the film ranked number 17 on Entertainment Weeklys list of "50 Best High School Movies". The following year, Coppola re-teamed with James Caan for Gardens of Stone, but the film was overshadowed by the death of Coppola's eldest son Gian-Carlo Coppola during the film's production. The movie was not a critical success and performed poorly at the box office, earning only $5.6 million against a budget of $13 million. Coppola directed Tucker: The Man and His Dream the following year. A biopic based on the life of Preston Tucker and his attempt to produce and market the Tucker '48, Coppola had originally conceived the project as a musical with Marlon Brando after the release of The Godfather Part II. Ultimately it was Jeff Bridges who played the role of Preston Tucker. Budgeted at $24 million, the film received positive reviews and earned three nominations at the 62nd Academy Awards, although its $19.65 million box office was a disappointment. Two awards came its way: Martin Landau won the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor and Dean Tavoularis took BAFTA's honors for Best Production Design.
    In 1986, along with producer George Lucas, he was able to indulge himself by making Captain EO, a 17-minute space fantasy for Disney theme parks starring singer Michael Jackson.
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  • 1984
    Age 44
    In 1984 Coppola directed the Robert Evans-produced The Cotton Club.
    More Details Hide Details The film was nominated for several awards, including Golden Globes for Best Director and Best Picture (Drama) and the Oscars for Best Film Editing and Best Art-Direction. However, the film failed miserably at the box-office, recouping only $25.9 million of the $47.9 million privately invested by brothers Fred and Ed Doumani. The same year he directed an episode of Faerie Tale Theatre entitled Rip Van Winkle, where Harry Dean Stanton played the lead role.
  • 1983
    Age 43
    In 1983, he directed The Outsiders, a film adaptation of the novel of the same name by S. E. Hinton.
    More Details Hide Details Coppola credited his inspiration for making the film to a suggestion from middle school students who had read the novel. The Outsiders is notable for being the breakout film for a number of young actors who would go on to become major stars. These included major roles for Matt Dillon, Ralph Macchio and C. Thomas Howell. Also in the cast were Patrick Swayze, Rob Lowe, Emilio Estevez, Diane Lane and Tom Cruise. Matt Dillon and several others also starred in Coppola's related film, Rumble Fish, which was also based on a S. E. Hinton novel and filmed at the same time as The Outsiders on-location in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Carmine Coppola wrote and edited the musical score, including the title song "Stay Gold", which was based upon a famous Robert Frost poem and performed for the movie by Stevie Wonder. The film was a moderate box-office success, drawing a revenue of $25 million against a budget of $10 million.
  • 1982
    Age 42
    Following the disastrous One from the Heart, Coppola co-directed Hammett along with Wim Wenders in the same year. Although Coppola was not credited for his effort, according to one source, "by the time the final version was released in 1982, only 30 percent of Wenders' footage remained and the rest was completely reshot by Coppola, whose mere 'executive producer' credit is just a technicality."
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1979
    Age 39
    The film was overwhelmingly lauded by critics when it finally appeared in 1979 and was selected for the 1979 Cannes Film Festival, winning the Palme d'Or along with The Tin Drum, directed by Volker Schlöndorff.
    More Details Hide Details When the film screened at Cannes, he quipped: "My film is not about Vietnam, it is Vietnam." Apocalypse Nows reputation has grown in time and it is now regarded by many as a masterpiece of the New Hollywood era and is frequently cited as one of the greatest movies ever made. Roger Ebert considers it to be the finest film on the Vietnam war and included it on his list for the 2002 Sight & Sound poll for the greatest movie of all time. In 2001, Coppola re-released Apocalypse Now as Apocalypse Now Redux, restoring several sequences lost from the original 1979 cut of the film, thereby expanding its length to 200 minutes. Apocalypse Now marked the end of the golden phase of Coppola's career. His musical fantasy One from the Heart, although pioneering the use of video-editing techniques which are standard practice in the film industry today, ended with a disastrous box-office gross of $636,796 against a US$26 million budget, far from enough to recoup the costs incurred in the production of the movie and he was forced to sell his 23-acre Zoetrope Studio in 1983. He would spend the rest of the decade working to pay off his debts. (Zoetrope Studios finally filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 1990, after which its name was changed to American Zoetrope).
  • 1977
    Age 37
    Since Coppola, two other directors have done the same: Herbert Ross in 1977 with The Goodbye Girl and The Turning Point, and Steven Soderbergh in 2000 with Erin Brockovich and Traffic.
    More Details Hide Details Coppola, however, is the only one to have produced the pictures. Following the success of The Godfather, The Conversation and The Godfather Part II, Coppola began filming Apocalypse Now, an adaptation of Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness set in Cambodia during the Vietnam War (Coppola himself briefly appears as a TV news director). The production of the film was plagued by numerous problems, including typhoons, nervous breakdowns, the firing of Harvey Keitel, Martin Sheen's heart attack, extras from the Philippine military and half of the supplied helicopters leaving in the middle of scenes to go fight rebels and an unprepared Brando with a bloated appearance (which Coppola attempted to hide by shooting him in the shadows). It was delayed so often it was nicknamed Apocalypse When? The 1991 documentary film Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, directed by Eleanor Coppola (Francis's wife), Fax Bahr and George Hickenlooper, chronicles the difficulties the crew went through making Apocalypse Now and features behind-the-scenes footage filmed by Eleanor. After filming Apocalypse Now, Coppola famously stated: "We were in the jungle, there were too many of us, we had access to too much money, too much equipment and little by little, we went insane."
  • 1975
    Age 35
    Sagan had died a week earlier and Coppola claimed that Sagan's novel Contact was based on a story the pair had developed for a television special back in 1975, titled First Contact.
    More Details Hide Details Under their development agreement, Coppola and Sagan were to split proceeds from the project with American Zoetrope and Children's Television Workshop Productions, as well as any novel Sagan would write. The TV program was never produced, but in 1985, Simon & Schuster published Sagan's Contact and Warner Bros. moved forward with development of a film adaptation. Coppola sought at least $250,000 in compensatory damages and an injunction against production or distribution of the film.
  • 1974
    Age 34
    The movie was a critical success and Coppola won his first Palme d'Or at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details During the filming of The Conversation, Coppola wrote the screenplay for The Great Gatsby. However, in the commentary track to the DVD of The Godfather Coppola states, "I don't think that script was actually made." Coppola shot The Godfather Part II parallel to The Conversation and it was the last major American motion picture to be filmed in Technicolor. George Lucas commented on the film after its five-hour-long preview, telling Coppola: "You have two films. Take one away, it doesn't work", referring to the movie's portrayal of two parallel storylines; one of a young Vito Corleone and the other of his son Michael. In the director's commentary on the DVD edition of the film (released in 2002), Coppola states that this film was the first major motion picture to use "Part II" in its title. Paramount was initially opposed to his decision to name the movie The Godfather Part II. According to Coppola, the studio's objection stemmed from the belief that audiences would be reluctant to see a film with such a title, as the audience would supposedly believe that, having already seen The Godfather, there was little reason to see an addition to the original story. However, the success of The Godfather Part II began the Hollywood tradition of numbered sequels. The movie was released in 1974 and went on to receive tremendous critical acclaim, with many deeming it superior to its predecessor.
  • 1970
    Age 30
    Coppola co-wrote the script for Patton in 1970 along with Edmund H. North.
    More Details Hide Details This earned him his first Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. However, it was not easy for Coppola to convince Franklin J. Schaffner that the opening scene would work. Coppola later revealed in an interview: "When the title role was offered to George C. Scott, he remembered having read Coppola's screenplay earlier. He stated flatly that he would accept the part only if they used Coppola's script. 'Scott is the one who resurrected my version,' says Coppola." The movie opens with Scott's rendering of Patton's famous military "Pep Talk" to members of the Third Army, set against a huge American flag. Coppola and North had to tone down Patton's actual language to avoid an R rating; in the opening monologue, the word "fornicating" replaced "fucking" when criticizing the The Saturday Evening Post. Over the years, this opening monologue has become an iconic scene and has spawned parodies in numerous films, political cartoons and television shows.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1969
    Age 29
    In 1969, Coppola took it upon himself to subvert the studio system which he felt had stifled his visions, intending to produce mainstream pictures to finance off-beat projects and give first-time directors their chance to direct.
    More Details Hide Details He decided he would name his future studio "Zoetrope" after receiving a gift of zoetropes from Mogens Scot-Hansen, founder of a studio called Lanterna Film and owner of a famous collection of early motion picture-making equipment. While touring Europe, Coppola was introduced to alternative filmmaking equipment and inspired by the bohemian spirit of Lanterna Film, he decided he would build a deviant studio that would conceive and implement creative, unconventional approaches to filmmaking. Upon his return home, Coppola and George Lucas searched for a mansion in Marin County to house the studio. However, in 1969, with equipment flowing in and no mansion found yet, the first home for Zoetrope Studio became a warehouse in San Francisco on Folsom Street. The studio went on to become an early adopter of digital filmmaking, including some of the earliest uses of HDTV. In his book The American Cinema, Andrew Sarris wrote, "Coppola is probably the first reasonably talented and sensibly adaptable directorial talent to emerge from a university curriculum in film-making... He may be heard from more decisively in the future."
    The film introduced to him George Lucas, who became his lifelong friend as well as production assistant in his next film The Rain People in 1969.
    More Details Hide Details It was written, directed and initially produced by Coppola himself, though as the movie advanced, he exceeded his budget and the studio had to underwrite the remainder of the movie. The film won the Golden Shell at the 1969 San Sebastian Film Festival.
  • 1967
    Age 27
    This movie brought him some critical acclaim and eventually his Master of Fine Arts Degree from UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television in 1967.
    More Details Hide Details Following the success of You're a Big Boy Now, Coppola was offered the reins of the movie version of the Broadway musical Finian's Rainbow, starring Petula Clark in her first American film and veteran Fred Astaire. Producer Jack L. Warner was nonplussed by Coppola's shaggy-haired, bearded, "hippie" appearance and generally left him to his own devices. He took his cast to the Napa Valley for much of the outdoor shooting, but these scenes were in sharp contrast to those obviously filmed on a Hollywood soundstage, resulting in a disjointed look to the film. Dealing with outdated material at a time when the popularity of film musicals was already on the downslide, Coppola's result was only semi-successful, but his work with Clark no doubt contributed to her Golden Globe Best Actress nomination.
  • 1965
    Age 25
    In 1965, Coppola won the annual Samuel Goldwyn Award for the best screenplay (Pilma, Pilma) written by a UCLA student.
    More Details Hide Details This secured him a job as a scriptwriter with Seven Arts. In between, he co-wrote the scripts for This Property Is Condemned (1966) and Is Paris Burning? (1966). However, with fame still eluding him and partly out of desperation, Coppola bought the rights to the David Benedictus novel You're a Big Boy Now and fused it with a story idea of his own, resulting in You're a Big Boy Now (1966). This was his UCLA thesis project that also received a theatrical release via Warner Bros.
  • 1962
    Age 22
    Coppola was hired as an assistant by Roger Corman and his first job for Corman was to dub and re-edit a Russian science fiction film, Nebo zovyot, which he turned into a sex-and-violence monster movie entitled Battle Beyond the Sun, released in 1962.
    More Details Hide Details Impressed by Coppola's perseverance and dedication, Corman hired him as dialogue director on Tower of London (1962), sound man for The Young Racers (1963) and associate producer of The Terror (1963). While on location in Ireland for The Young Racers in 1963, Corman, ever alert for an opportunity to produce a decent movie on a shoestring budget, persuaded Coppola to make a low-budget horror movie with funds left over from the movie. Coppola wrote a brief draft story idea in one night, incorporating elements from Hitchcock's Psycho, and the result impressed Corman enough to give him the go-ahead. On a budget of $40,000 ($20,000 from Corman and $20,000 from another producer who wanted to buy the movie's English rights), Coppola directed in a period of nine days Dementia 13, his first feature from his own screenplay. The film recouped its expenses and later became a cult film among horror buffs. It was on the sets of Dementia 13 that he met his future wife Eleanor Jessie Neil.
    Coppola enrolled in UCLA Film School for graduate work in film. There he directed a short horror film called The Two Christophers inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's "William Wilson", and Ayamonn the Terrible, a film about a sculptor's nightmares coming to life, before directing the experimental softcore comedy Tonight for Sure in 1962.
    More Details Hide Details At UCLA, Coppola met Jim Morrison. He later used Morrison's song "The End" in Apocalypse Now. The company that hired him for Tonight for Sure brought him back to re-cut a German film titled Mit Eva fing die Sünde an directed by Fritz Umgelter. He added some new 3-D color footage and earned a writer's and director's credit for The Bellboy and the Playgirls, also a box-office failure.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1955
    Age 15
    He entered Hofstra College in 1955 with a major in theater arts.
    More Details Hide Details There he was awarded a scholarship in playwriting. This furthered his interest in directing theater despite the disapproval of his father, who wanted him to study engineering. Coppola was profoundly impressed after seeing Sergei Eisenstein's October: Ten Days That Shook the World, especially with the movie's quality of editing. It was at this time Coppola decided he would go into cinema rather than theater. Coppola says he was tremendously influenced to become a writer early on by his brother, August, in whose footsteps he would also follow by attending both of his brother's alma maters: Hofstra and UCLA. Coppola also gives credit to the work of Elia Kazan and for its influence on him as a director. Amongst Coppola's classmates at Hofstra were James Caan, Lainie Kazan and radio artist Joe Frank. He later cast Lainie Kazan in One from the Heart and Caan in The Rain People and The Godfather.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1948
    Age 8
    The winery displays several of Coppola's Oscars along with memorabilia from his movies, including Vito Corleone's desk from The Godfather and a restored 1948 Tucker Sedan as used in Tucker: The Man and His Dream.
    More Details Hide Details Included in the Francis Ford Coppola Presents lifestyle brand are several hotels and resorts around the world. The Blancaneaux Lodge in Belize, which from the early 1980s was a family retreat until it was opened to the public in 1993 as a 20-room luxury resort and The Turtle Inn, in Placencia, Belize, (both of which have won several prestigious awards including "Travel + Leisure's World's Best: Best Resort in Central & South America"); La Lancha in Lago Petén Itzá, Guatemala; Jardin Escondido in Buenos Aires, Argentina and Palazzo Margherita in Bernalda, Italy. In San Francisco, Coppola owns a restaurant named Cafe Zoetrope, located in the Sentinel Building where American Zoetrope is based. It serves traditional Italian cuisine and wine from his personal estate vineyard. For 14 years from 1994, Coppola co-owned the Rubicon restaurant in San Francisco along with Robin Williams and Robert De Niro. Rubicon closed in August 2008.
  • 1939
    Born
    Born in 1939.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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