François Truffaut
French screenwriter, director, producer or actor
François Truffaut
François Roland Truffaut was an influential film critic and filmmaker, one of the founders of the French New Wave. In a film career lasting over a quarter of a century, he remains an icon of the French film industry. He was also a screenwriter, producer, and actor working on over twenty-five films.
Biography
François Truffaut's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of François Truffaut
News
News abour François Truffaut from around the web
Ray of inspiration - Boston Herald
Google News - over 5 years
He wrote the screenplay for Melville's “Moby Dick,” directed by John Huston, and his own books were turned into brilliant movies, including “Fahrenheit 451,” directed by Francois Truffaut and starring Julie Christie and Oskar Werner,
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An American quilt - Livemint
Google News - over 5 years
... film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, as the alien spacecraft is about to make contact with the planet Earth, among the people who have gathered to see the landing is a scientist, played by the talented French film director, François Truffaut
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Oddball Japanese Interracial 60's Buddy Film 'Black Sun' Now On Criterion - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Considered the leader at the forefront of what was considred in the 1960's as the Japanese “New Wave” film movement which was inspired by the French New Wave films of Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc Goddard, the opportunity to see any of his films have
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David Nicholls: love, literature and London - Time Out London
Google News - over 5 years
In September, Nicholls is giving a lecture at the Institut Français on the work of François Truffaut, which is interesting given the resemblance between 'One Day' and Truffaut's Antoine Doinel films in which we are invited to grow older with a set of
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Bitter Public Rift Ended New Wave Tango for Godard, Truffaut: Peter Rainer - Bloomberg
Google News - over 5 years
Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut during happier times in "Two in the Wave." The French documentary chronicles the fracturing of their close friendship. Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut during
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Second Look: 'The Complete Jean Vigo' coming Aug. 30 - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
His work influenced many who followed, including François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard. Du Verron stars in the short film "Zéro De Conduite." (Criterion Collection) By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times Minute for minute, there is almost
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White Men Can't Jump - A.V. Club
Google News - over 5 years
The François Truffaut of the sports movie, Bull Durham and Cobb director Ron Shelton made one of his best with White Men Can't Jump. Woody Harrelson plays Billy Hoyle, an amateur basketball player who hustles games not by pretending to suck at hoops,
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Jean-Luc Godard: 'Film is over. What to do?' - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
It is hard to see him as "the shit" fellow New Wave director François Truffaut fell out with in the 1970s. He is even nice about Hollywood, or at least the Hollywood of the 1930s-1950s, "that could make films like no one else could
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Hollywood Grind: Michael, Tom, and Francois - Twitch
Google News - over 5 years
So I don't know how much the words of Francois Truffaut, quoted above, apply to either of the directors behind those two Hollywood studio projects. However, I think it's clear that Michael Bay and Tom Hanks had the public in mind when they conceived
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The Princess of Montpensier/ La Princesse de Montpensier - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
Starring Mélanie Thierry, Gaspard Ulliel, Grégoire Leprince-Ringuet, Lambert Wilson Club, IFI, Dublin, 139 min BACK IN THE 1960s, directors such as Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut and Éric Rohmer formed the nouvelle vague partly as a reaction
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Fresh faces join icons of French cinema - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
It features films from four icons of French cinema: Jean-Luc Godard's latest, “Film Socialisme''; a new print of François Truffaut's “The Soft Skin,'' from 1964; Gérard Depardieu in two films (“Mammuth'' and “My Afternoons With Margueritte'');
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Bernard Herrmann At 100: Master Of The Movie Score - NPR (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Bernard Herrmann's music helped make Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho and Vertigo, Orson Welles' Citizen Kane, François Truffaut's Fahrenheit 451 and Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver into iconic works of art. Composers of film music (and, these days,
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The 400 Blows - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
One could date the start of the American independent film movement with the release in France in 1959 of a picture that heralded the beginning of the French New Wave: François Truffaut's first feature—made when he was 27—and one of the classics of
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Bernard Herrmann at 100 - CBS News
Google News - over 5 years
His collaborations with directors Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Francois Truffaut, Brian De Palma and Martin Scorsese are landmarks in cinema. And while the fiery and temperamental artist became a pariah to many in the Hollywood film industry (he was
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A primer to 'Panic' - Pioneer Press
Google News - over 5 years
He's also there to be interviewed by a French critic who plans to become a filmmaker (Hitchcock did the same with Francois Truffaut, who turned their interviews into a book and also became France's leading director). To enjoy "Panic," you don't need to
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of François Truffaut
    FIFTIES
  • 1984
    Age 52
    He was expected to attend his friend Miloš Forman's Amadeus premiere when he died on 21 October 1984, aged 52, at the American Hospital in Neuilly-sur-Seine in France.
    More Details Hide Details At the time of his death, he still had numerous films in preparation. His goal was to make 30 films and then retire to write books for his remaining days. He was five films short of his personal goal. He is buried in Paris' Montmartre Cemetery. The 400 Blows was released in 1959 to much critical and commercial acclaim. Truffaut received a Best Director award from the Cannes Film Festival, the same festival that had banned him only one year earlier. The film follows the character of Antoine Doinel through his perilous misadventures in school, an unhappy home life and later reform school. The film is highly autobiographical. Both Truffaut and Doinel were only children of loveless marriages; they both committed petty crimes of theft and truancy from the military. Truffaut cast Jean-Pierre Léaud as Antoine Doinel. Léaud was seen as an ordinary boy of 14 who auditioned for the role after seeing a flyer, but interviews filmed after the film's release (one is included on the Criterion DVD of the film) reveal Léaud's natural sophistication and an instinctive understanding of acting for the camera. Léaud and Truffaut collaborated on several films over the years. Their most noteworthy collaboration was the continuation of the Antoine Doinel character in a series of films called "The Antoine Doinel Cycle".
  • 1983
    Age 51
    In July 1983, Truffaut rented France Gall and Michel Berger's house outside Honfleur, Normandy (composing for Philippe Labro's film, Rive droite, rive gauche) when he had a first stroke and was diagnosed with a brain tumor.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1980
    Age 48
    One of Truffaut's final films gave him an international revival. In 1980, his film The Last Metro garnered twelve César Award nominations with ten wins, including Best Director.
    More Details Hide Details Truffaut's final movie was shot in black and white. It gives his career almost a sense of having bookends. Confidentially Yours is Truffaut's tribute to his favorite director, Alfred Hitchcock. It deals with numerous Hitchcockian themes, such as private guilt vs. public innocence, a woman investigating a murder, anonymous locations, etc. Among Truffaut's films, a series features the character Antoine Doinel, played by the actor Jean-Pierre Léaud. He began his career in The 400 Blows at the age of fourteen, and continued as the favorite actor and "double" of Truffaut. The series continued with Antoine and Colette (a short film in the anthology Love at Twenty), Stolen Kisses (in which he falls in love with Christine Darbon alias Claude Jade), Bed and Board about the married couple Antoine and Christine—and, finally, Love on the Run, where the couple go through a divorce.
  • 1976
    Age 44
    Truffaut's 1976 film Small Change gained a Golden Globe Nomination for Best Foreign Film.
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  • 1975
    Age 43
    In 1975, Truffaut gained more notoriety with The Story of Adele H. Isabelle Adjani in the title role earned a nomination for a Best Actress Oscar.
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  • 1973
    Age 41
    Day for Night won Truffaut a Best Foreign Film Oscar in 1973.
    More Details Hide Details The film is probably his most reflective work. It is the story of a film crew trying to finish their film while dealing with all of the personal and professional problems that accompany making a movie. Truffaut plays the director of the fictional film being made. This film features scenes shown in his previous films. It is considered to be his best film since his earliest work. Time magazine placed it on their list of 100 Best Films of the Century (along with The 400 Blows).
  • THIRTIES
  • 1968
    Age 36
    He had affairs with many of his leading ladies: in 1968 he was engaged to actress Claude Jade; Truffaut and actress Fanny Ardant lived together from 1981 to 1984 and had a daughter, Joséphine Truffaut (born 28 September 1983).
    More Details Hide Details Truffaut was an atheist.
  • 1966
    Age 34
    As for Truffaut, his first non-French film was an 1966 adaptation of Ray Bradbury's classic science fiction novel Fahrenheit 451, showcasing Truffaut's love of books.
    More Details Hide Details His only English-speaking film was a great challenge for Truffaut, because he barely spoke English himself. This was also his first film shot in color. The larger scale production was difficult for Truffaut, who had worked only with small crews and budgets. Truffaut worked on projects with varied subjects. The Bride Wore Black (1968), a brutal tale of revenge, is a stylish homage to the films of Alfred Hitchcock (once again starring Jeanne Moreau). Mississippi Mermaid (1969), with Catherine Deneuve, is an identity-bending romantic thriller. Stolen Kisses (1968) and Bed and Board (1970) are continuations of the Antoine Doinel Cycle. And The Wild Child (1970) included Truffaut's acting debut in the lead role of 18th century physician Jean Marc Gaspard Itard. Two English Girls (1971) is the female reflection of the same love story as "Jules et Jim". It is based on a story written by Henri-Pierre Roche, who also wrote Jules and Jim. It is about a man who falls equally in love with two sisters, and their love affair over a period of years.
  • 1963
    Age 31
    In 1963, Truffaut was approached to direct an American film called Bonnie and Clyde, with a treatment written by Esquire journalists, David Newman and Robert Benton intended to introduce the French New Wave to Hollywood.
    More Details Hide Details Although he was interested enough to help in script development, Truffaut ultimately declined, but not before interesting Jean-Luc Godard and American actor and would be producer, Warren Beatty, the latter of whom proceeded with the film with director Arthur Penn.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1962
    Age 30
    In 1962, Truffaut directed his third movie, Jules and Jim, a romantic drama starring Jeanne Moreau.
    More Details Hide Details Over the next decade, Truffaut had varying degrees of success with his films.
  • 1959
    Age 27
    After seeing Orson Welles' Touch of Evil at the Expo 58, he was inspired to make his feature film debut in 1959 with Les Quatre Cents Coups (The 400 Blows).
    More Details Hide Details This film was an instant success and won him a prize at the Cannes Film Festival. This film and the following films were successful even with the low budget he had to make the films. He also acted, appearing in Steven Spielberg's 1977 film Close Encounters of the Third Kind, where he played scientist Claude Lacombe.
  • 1957
    Age 25
    Truffaut was married to Madeleine Morgenstern from 1957 to 1965, and they had two daughters, Laura (born 1959) and Eva (born 1961).
    More Details Hide Details Madeleine was the daughter of Ignace Morgenstern, managing director of one of France's largest film distribution companies, and was largely responsible for securing funding for Truffaut's first films.
  • 1955
    Age 23
    After having been a critic, Truffaut decided to make films of his own. He started out with the short film Une Visite in 1955 and followed that up with Les Mistons in 1957.
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  • 1954
    Age 22
    In 1954, Truffaut wrote an article called "Une Certaine Tendance du Cinéma Français" ("A Certain Trend of French Cinema"), in which he attacked the current state of French films, lambasting certain screenwriters and producers.
    More Details Hide Details The article resulted in a storm of controversy. Truffaut later devised the auteur theory, which stated that the director was the "author" of his work; that great directors such as Renoir or Hitchcock have distinct styles and themes that permeate all of their films. Although his theory was not widely accepted then, it gained some support in the 1960s from American critic Andrew Sarris. In 1967, Truffaut published his book-length interview of Hitchcock, Hitchcock/Truffaut (New York: Simon and Schuster).
  • TEENAGE
  • 1950
    Age 18
    Truffaut joined the French Army in 1950, aged 18, but spent the next two years trying to escape.
    More Details Hide Details Truffaut was arrested for attempting to desert the army. Bazin used his various political contacts to get Truffaut released and set him up with a job at his newly formed film magazine Cahiers du cinéma. Over the next few years, Truffaut became a critic (and later editor) at Cahiers, where he became notorious for his brutal, unforgiving reviews. He was called "The Gravedigger of French Cinema" and was the only French critic not invited to the Cannes Film Festival in 1958. He supported Bazin in the development of one of the most influential theories of cinema itself, the auteur theory.
  • 1948
    Age 16
    After starting his own film club in 1948, Truffaut met André Bazin, who would have great effect on his professional and personal life.
    More Details Hide Details Bazin was a critic and the head of another film society at the time. He became a personal friend of Truffaut's and helped him out of various financial and criminal situations during his formative years.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1939
    Age 7
    He was eight years old when he saw his first movie, Abel Gance's Paradis Perdu (Paradise Lost) from 1939.
    More Details Hide Details It was there that his obsession began. He frequently played truant from school and would sneak into theaters because he didn't have enough money for admission. After being expelled from several schools, at the age of fourteen he decided to become self-taught. Two of his academic goals were to watch three movies a day and read three books a week. Truffaut frequented Henri Langlois' Cinémathèque Française where he was exposed to countless foreign films from around the world. It was here that he became familiar with American cinema and directors such as John Ford, Howard Hawks and Nicholas Ray, as well as those of British director Alfred Hitchcock.
  • 1932
    Age 0
    Truffaut was born in Paris on 6 February 1932.
    More Details Hide Details His mother was Janine de Montferrand. His mother's future husband, Roland Truffaut, accepted him as an adopted son and gave him his surname. He was passed around to live with various nannies and his grandmother for a number of years. It was his grandmother who instilled in him her love of books and music. He lived with his grandmother until her death when Truffaut was eight years old. It was only after his grandmother's death that he lived with his parents for the first time. The identity of Truffaut's biological father was unknown, though a private detective agency in 1968 revealed that their inquiry into the matter led to a Roland Levy, a Jewish dentist from Bayonne. Truffaut's mother's family disputed the findings but Truffaut himself believed and embraced them. Truffaut would often stay with friends and try to be out of the house as much as possible. His best friend throughout his youth and until his death was Robert Lachenay, who was the inspiration for the character René Bigey in The 400 Blows and would work as an assistant on some of Truffaut's films. It was the cinema that offered him the greatest escape from an unsatisfying home life.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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