Frank Fay
Frank Fay
Frank Fay was an American film and stage actor, emcee, comedian, best known as an actor for having played "Elwood P. Dowd" in the play Harvey by the American playwright Mary Coyle Chase on Broadway. James Stewart played the role in the film version.
Biography
Frank Fay's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Frank Fay
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Frank Fay
Show More Show Less
News
News abour Frank Fay from around the web
Today's Open Thread: #1 Barbara Stanwyck - Big Hollywood
Google News - over 5 years
One of her husbands, actor Frank Fay (he was the original Elwood P. Dowd in the stage version of "Harvey") used to physically abuse her. Once Stanwyck was doing a role where the actor opposite her had to slap her in a scene, but he was so afraid of
Article Link:
Google News article
'Game Development' bei GAMEplaces BUSINESS & LEGAL am 28. Juni - inar.de (Pressemitteilung)
Google News - over 5 years
Frank Fay, Head of Project Management bei Gameforge, zum Thema Projektmanagement in der Gameproduktion Frankfurt am Main, 7. ...Frank Fay, Head of Project Management bei Gameforge, zum Thema Projektmanagement in der Gameproduktion Frankfurt am Main, 7
Article Link:
Google News article
Rain grounding local golf leagues - Sunny South News
Google News - over 5 years
Low team net was also a shared result with Frank Fay, Geo Power, Milt Anstey and Ken Purdue posting a 68 for McDonald Nissan and Wayne Pavey, Cliff Nelson, Marvin Macka nd John Wellman doing the same for College Ford Lincoln
Article Link:
Google News article
Thank you, thank you … - LGBT Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
It was especially nice to spend some time with Academy award winning writer Dustin Lance Black and his most handsome and wonderful partner Frank Fay who is my new Housewives reality shows sister! Lance has become a most articulate and moving public
Article Link:
Google News article
Golf league action underway - Sunny South News
Google News - almost 6 years
Low team net was a three-way tie at 63 with Harvey Nikkel, Bob Young, Frank Fay and Fred Mehlhaff posting it for McDonald Nissan; Doug Gibson, Greg Fisher, James Stretch and Hal Ratzlaff for Simpson Plumbing; and Glen Meyers, George High,
Article Link:
Google News article
DVDS; A Long Way From Brooklyn
NYTimes - almost 7 years
BARBARA STANWYCK must be one of the best represented classical-era stars on DVD. With its new boxed set -- six films on three discs -- Universal all but clears the shelves of any remaining Stanwyck titles in its library (which includes pre-1948 Paramount sound features). A respectable number, though far from all, of her 80-odd vehicles are
Article Link:
NYTimes article
If You're Thinking of Living In/Kinnelon, N.J.; Residential Life Amid Natural Beauty
NYTimes - over 13 years
BUILT down the rugged slopes of the Ramapo Mountains and around half a dozen lakes, the 19.5-square-mile Kinnelon Borough in northeastern Morris County, N.J., has no industry, few stores, no condominiums and only one multifamily housing complex, now under construction. Sidewalks are a rarity, bears are frequent backyard visitors and most of its
Article Link:
NYTimes article
METROPOLITAN DIARY
NYTimes - over 16 years
DEAR DIARY: I was looking for an old fan in the attic and found instead a 48-star flag and the sleek and slender wedding dress I wore 50 years ago when I, too, was sleek and slender. And a scrapbook from the years 1943-1948 with the contents pure New York nostalgia. 1943: City of New York transit pass, 5 cents. Menu: Ed Winston's tropical bar in
Article Link:
NYTimes article
THEATER; A Pair of Players Who Can Play Abandonment With Abandon
NYTimes - about 18 years
FOR one brief misconceived moment ''The Gin Game'' sang. That was in 1986, in a musical loser titled ''Jokers'' at Goodspeed Opera House's Norma Terris Theater in Chester, where a hostile two-hander involving the combative lost souls, Weller Martin and Fonsia Dorsey, visitorless on visitors' day in a decrepit nursing home, was stretched out with
Article Link:
NYTimes article
High School Offers Honors to Alumni
NYTimes - almost 21 years
AS one of his alma mater's most ardent sports boosters, and as a longtime junior team coach, Tom Corbo has maintained close ties with Norwalk High School since his graduation in 1950. He has watched with pride as one of the school's alumni, Calvin Murphy, went on to become an all-America basketball player at Niagara University and then an all-star
Article Link:
NYTimes article
SPOTLIGHT;A Man's Best Friend
NYTimes - over 21 years
Henry Koster's film HARVY (1950) is one up on Broadway: it had James Stewart - MONDAY at 9 P.M. and MONDAY/EARLY TUESDAY at 2:20 A.M. on the DISNEY CHANNEL. In Mary Chase's Pulitzer Prize-winning lark about a tipler and his imagined giant rabbit pal (Harvey), Frank Fay scored as a gentle eccentric. But Stewart's warmth added dimension. The story
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Barbara Stanwyck, Actress, Dead at 82
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: Barbara Stanwyck, the luminous star of such classic movies as ''Stella Dallas,'' ''The Lady Eve'' and ''Double Indemnity'' and the award-winning western television series ''The Big Valley,'' died of congestive heart failure late Saturday at St. John's Hospital and Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif. Barbara Stanwyck, the luminous star of
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Barbara Stanwyck, Actress, Is Dead in California at 82
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: Barbara Stanwyck, the luminous protagonist of such classic movies as ''Stella Dallas,'' ''The Lady Eve'' and ''Double Indemnity'' and the award-winning western television series ''The Big Valley'' in the 1960's, died of congestive heart failure yesterday in a hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. She was 82 years old. Barbara Stanwyck, the
Article Link:
NYTimes article
A Producer's Gershwin Coup
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: STILL stage- and star-struck after all these years, the 47-year-old Arthur Whitelaw, who at 23 was described as ''perhaps the youngest producer in the theater'' - and at 17 was indisputably the youngest, and reportedly the first, to bring professional live theater to Smithtown - is scoring a coup in television. STILL stage- and star-struck
Article Link:
NYTimes article
SCOUTING; Touch Football After the N.F.L.
NYTimes - about 30 years
After four years as a backup quarterback in the National Football League, Bob Holly filled the same role this season, but in a far less glamorous milieu - a touch football league. After an outstanding career at Princeton, in 1982 the 6-foot-2-inch quarterback was an 11th-round pick by the Washington Redskins, where he spent two seasons as a backup
Article Link:
NYTimes article
SYRACUSE PREVAILS BY 29-0
NYTimes - over 32 years
Harold Gayden rushed for 94 yards on 13 carries, including touchdowns of 10 and 4 yards, as Syracuse defeated Navy, 29-0, today. Navy played without its starting quarterback, Bill Byrne; its starting tight end, Mark Stevens, and its punter, Mark Colby, who were all injured last week in the 18-17 loss to Notre Dame at Giants Stadium. Navy (3-5-1)
Article Link:
NYTimes article
COLUMBIA LOSES TO LAFAYETTE RALLY, 34-29
NYTimes - over 33 years
Frank Novak passed for four touchdowns and the fullback Craig Williams rushed for the game-winning touchdown with 71 seconds remaining today as Lafayette defeated Columbia, 34-29. Williams's 3-yard plunge capped a 12-play, 75-yard drive that consumed 5 minutes 3 seconds. Columbia had taken a 29-28 lead 5 minutes earlier on an 11-yard pass from John
Article Link:
NYTimes article
MARY CHASE, 74, PLAYWRIGHT WHO WROTE 'HARVEY,' DEAD
NYTimes - over 35 years
Mary Chase, the imaginative playwright who became famous and wealthy by creating an invisible rabbit named Harvey that dwelled in the minds of theater and movie audiences all over the world, died Tuesday in Denver, where she was born 74 years ago. While working in newspaper and promotional jobs, including publicity director for the National Youth
Article Link:
NYTimes article
PATSY KELLY, ACTRESS IS DEAD: PLAYED COMIC ROLES IN FILMS
NYTimes - over 35 years
Patsy Kelly, the pert, rumpled farceur of knockabout movie comedies of the 1930's and 40's who won a Tony Award for her performance as an irascible, wise-cracking maid in the 1971 Broadway revival of ''No, No, Nanette,'' died Thursday in the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif., after a long illness. She was 71 years old
Article Link:
NYTimes article
BARBARA STANWYCK:'I'M A TOMORROW WOMAN'; LOS ANGELES It was after the third or fourth letter came asking where she was buried that Barbara Stanwyck ended a self-imposed retirement to appear in a ''Charlie's Angels'' television segment last year. She had s
NYTimes - almost 36 years
''You have to know when you've had your hour, your place in the sun,'' Miss Stanwyck said on a springlike day in her 73d year. ''I pity an actor who doesn't understand that.'' Her hair is silver - but it has been silver for more than 30 years. When it turned prematurely gray, she refused to dye it, just as she refused to lie about her age.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Frank Fay
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1961
    Age 69
    Died on September 25, 1961.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1943
    Age 51
    Fay made a brief screen comeback in 1943 for the low-budget Monogram Pictures.
    More Details Hide Details He was teamed with comedian Billy Gilbert for a series of wartime comedies, but walked out after the opener, Spotlight Scandals. Fay was replaced by another comedian more congenial to Gilbert, Shemp Howard. After the end of World War II, he had third billing in a movie called Love Nest. Although very talented, Fay was disliked by most of the people he worked with because of his enormous ego. Actor Robert Wagner wrote that Fay was " one of the most dreadful men in the history of show business. Fay was a drunk, an anti-Semite, and a wife-beater, and Barbara Stanwyck had had to endure all of that", while according to actor and comedian Milton Berle “Fay’s friends could be counted on the missing arm of a one-armed man.” Berle, who was Jewish, claimed to have once hit Fay in the face with a stage brace after Fay, on seeing Berle watching his act from offstage, called out, "Get that little Jew bastard out of the wings".
  • FORTIES
  • 1937
    Age 45
    Their troubled marriage is thought by some to be the basis of the 1937 film A Star is Born, in which the previously unknown wife shoots to stardom while her husband's career goes into sharp decline.
    More Details Hide Details In January 1946, just months after Nazi Germany had been defeated, a rally of ten thousand white supremacists gathered at Madison Square Garden for a pro-Fascist event called "The Friends of Frank Fay." Born as Francis Anthony Donner in San Francisco, California, to Irish Catholic parents, he took the professional name of Frank Fay after concluding that his birth name was not suitable for the stage.
  • 1935
    Age 43
    The marriage reportedly soured when Fay's career was eclipsed by Stanwyck's success, and they divorced in 1935.
    More Details Hide Details Fay's Broadway talent and early success in talkies with his pre-Code risque humor did not bode well with the rising conservative movement ushered in by the Great Depression. Fay played in a series of films in which he was cast as a debonair lover, irresistible to women, that frequently threw in suggestive jokes (e.g., on homosexuality and sex). He was successful as a revue and nightclub comedian and master of ceremonies and appeared frequently on radio shows. He was cast in a bit part as master of ceremonies in the night club sequence of Nothing Sacred (1937). As late as the 1950s, one of his most enduring routines was taking a popular song and analysing the "senseless" lyrics, for example "Tea for Two":
  • THIRTIES
  • 1930
    Age 38
    He helped her jump-start her career in films, and she was given a contract by Warner Bros. late in 1930.
    More Details Hide Details Their only film appearance together was a brief skit in the short film The Stolen Jools (1931). They adopted a son, Dion, on December 5, 1932.
    Fay quickly found himself associated with musical films, and this led to a decline in his popularity when the public became sick of musicals late in 1930.
    More Details Hide Details In his next film, God's Gift to Women (1931), the musical sequences were cut for the American release, though they were retained for other countries. Fay failed to get the rave reviews he had previously enjoyed. He attempted to produce his own picture in 1932 and struck a deal with Warner Bros. to have them release his film. This film was titled A Fool's Advice (1932) and proved to be only moderately successful.
  • 1929
    Age 37
    When talkies arrived, Warner Bros. studio was eager to put him under contract along with a host of other famous stage personalities. Fay was cast as master of ceremonies in Warner Bros.' most expensive production of 1929, the all-star color all-talking revue The Show of Shows (1929).
    More Details Hide Details Based on the success of that film, Fay was quickly signed up for an all-Technicolor musical comedy entitled Under a Texas Moon (1930), in which he also displayed his singing abilities. The movie was a box office success and made a hit of the theme song, also titled "Under a Texas Moon". Fay sang the theme song several times throughout the picture. Another expensive picture, Bright Lights (1930), an extravagant all-Technicolor musical, quickly followed. Fay also starred in The Matrimonial Bed (1930), a Pre-Code comedy in which he sang the song "Fleur d'Amour" twice.
  • 1928
    Age 36
    Fay married Barbara Stanwyck in 1928, when she was relatively unknown.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1918
    Age 26
    He enjoyed considerable success as a variety artist starting around 1918, telling jokes and stories in a carefully planned "off the cuff" manner that was very original for the time.
    More Details Hide Details Jack Benny stated that he modeled his early stage character on Fay. During the 1920s, Fay was vaudeville's highest-paid headliner, earning $17,500 a week.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1891
    Born
    Born on November 17, 1891.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)