Freddie Bartholomew
Actor
Freddie Bartholomew
Frederick Cecil Bartholomew, known for his acting work as Freddie Bartholomew, was an English-American child actor. One of the most famous child actors of his time, Bartholomew rose to prominence in the 1930s for his work in Hollywood films. He is best known for his starring roles in Captains Courageous (1937) and Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936).
Biography
Freddie Bartholomew's personal information overview.
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News
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Ocean-going adventure in amphitheater - knox.VillageSoup.com
Google News - over 5 years
Spencer Tracy, left, sings to the "leetle feeshes" and young Freddie Bartholomew in the 1937 "Captains Courageous." Camden — As part of the Camden Windjammer Festival, Camden Public Library will present an outdoor screening of the 1937 "Captains
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Google News article
Casting Call: Who Could Play Holden Caulfield? - Gothamist
Google News - over 5 years
In The Catcher In The Rye, Holden Caulfield is described as resembling a child actor from a movie; LIFE.com says analysts have since pinpointed down who that actor was: English-born child actor named Freddie Bartholomew—specifically, as he appeared in
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“REALLY TRULY TRUE?” FICTIONALIZED FACT ON FILM - NewsTime
Google News - over 5 years
It has been quite a time since I read “Crowned Heads”, but I do remember that it featured a child-star (inspired by Freddie Bartholomew, I thought) whose stock film line was the naïve, tautologous question, “Is it really truly true?
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On Tonight: Portrait of a Chef, GOP Debate - Hartford Courant (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
It's Freddie Bartholomew night on Turner Classic Movies, with his appearances in "David Copperfield" (8 pm), "Lloyd's of London" (10:15 pm), "Captains Courageous" (12:15 am), "Listen Darling" (2:30 am) and "Lord Jeff" (4 am)
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O Pequeno Lord - Público.pt
Google News - over 5 years
O filme foi feito para a glória e proveito de Freddie Bartholomew, actor criança que nos anos 30 tentava rivalizar com Shirley Temple, e é um exemplo perfeito do cinema de Hollywood desta sua época de ouro. Texto: Cinemateca Portuguesa Para submeter o
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"Captains Courageous' next in film series at Red Barn Theatre - HollandSentinel.com
Google News - over 5 years
Based on a novel by Rudyard Kipling, this classic adventure tale stars Spencer Tracy in an Oscar-winning performance as Manuel, an old salt who fishes spoiled, rich brat Harvey Cheyne (Freddie Bartholomew) out of the drink. When the vessel's skipper
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Our Gang star Jackie Cooper could always make audiences laugh and cry - The Australian
Google News - almost 6 years
By the mid-30s other child stars were emerging to challenge Cooper and in The Devil is a Sissy (also known as The Devil Takes the Count) he appeared opposite two of them, Mickey Rooney and Freddie Bartholomew. Moreover, while Mayer had wanted Cooper
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TCM Remembers the Legendary Jackie Cooper Friday, May 13 with Nine-Film Tribute - TVbytheNumbers
Google News - almost 6 years
The day will also feature The Devil Is a Sissy (1936), co-starring Freddie Bartholomew and Mickey Rooney, and Tough Guy (1936), with Rin Tin Tin Jr. 6 am – Dinky (1935), with Mary Astor and Roger Pryor. 7:15 am – Divorce in the Family (1932),
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Jackie Cooper Pt.2: SUPERMAN's Perry White, Two-Time Emmy Winner - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
A series of programmers followed, among them Two Bright Boys (1939), once again pairing up Jackie Cooper with Freddie Bartholomew — who by then was sliding fast as well — and What a Life (1939), with Betty Field. In the latter release, Cooper played ... -
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THEATER REVIEW | 'PYGMALION'; Forecast: Rain in Spain, No Chance of Song
NYTimes - over 9 years
It used to drive George Bernard Shaw crazy that theatergoers would leave his ''Pygmalion'' believing the play's leading characters were destined for the altar. ''Disgusting'' was Shaw's word for the notion of a postcurtain wedding for Prof. Henry Higgins, the irascible phoneticist, and Eliza Doolittle, the cockney flower girl whom he teaches to
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NYTimes article
CRITIC'S CHOICE; Movies
NYTimes - over 11 years
THE LIFE AQUATIC WITH STEVE ZISSOU (2004) Saturday at 9 p.m. on Starz Steve (Bill Murray, right) is a world-weary ocean explorer who never lets an opportunity for pop-culture branding pass him by. But now he's angry: His sidekick has been eaten by a shark, and he vows revenge. The comedy that follows, however, bears absolutely no resemblance to
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NYTimes article
Garland's Midnight Blues, Recalled in a TV Portrait
NYTimes - about 13 years
In the twilight of her life Judy Garland sometimes sat alone at night speaking into a tape recorder. ''Do you realize how many people have talked about me, written about me, imitated me?'' she says on tape. ''Well it's high time to stop. This is the story of my life, and I, Judy Garland, am going to talk.'' The tapes -- ''I'm all by myself as
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NYTimes article
David Holt, 76, Once Seen As a Rival to Shirley Temple
NYTimes - over 13 years
David Holt, a former child actor once touted by Paramount Pictures as its answer to Shirley Temple, died on Saturday at his home here. He was 76. The cause was congestive heart failure, his family said. Mr. Holt, who grew up to become a successful jazz musician and songwriter, had a career that never came close to rivaling Ms. Temple's, but he did
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NYTimes article
MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - almost 14 years
THE plot of ANTONIA'S LINE (1995), Marleen Gorris's Oscar-winning Dutch comic drama, is powerfully simple, just the stuff of life everywhere. People meet, make love, have babies, grow old and die. Occasionally there are anomalies (the title character's daughter wants a child but not a husband), surprises (the baby turns out to be a math genius) and
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MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - over 14 years
WHEN a pretty ingenue who has just arrived in Los Angeles and a mysterious amnesia victim have their first lesbian encounter in MULHOLLAND DRIVE (2001), the wide-eyed ingenue (Naomi Watts) asks the other woman, ''Have you ever done this before?'' The amnesiac (Laura Elena Harring) answers, logically, ''I don't know.'' Some of David Lynch's fans had
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NYTimes article
Film; A Mogul Of the Best And Worst Kind
NYTimes - almost 15 years
YES, it's not just hype that somewhere or another, ''Gone With the Wind'' is still and always playing, and has been for more than 60 years, with some young woman watching, and knowing, that she is, or could have been, Scarlett! Where, exactly? My favorite example occurs in Steven Spielberg's ''Empire of the Sun.'' As Shanghai begins to break apart
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NYTimes article
MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - almost 16 years
JUDY BENJAMIN is 29, a happily pampered suburban princess who has just basked in all the attention of being a second-time bride. Then her new husband drops dead during their honeymoon. Understandably depressed, Judy (Goldie Hawn at her most adorable) falls prey to a persuasive Army recruiter. Only after she arrives at boot camp does she realize
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SPARE TIMES; FOR CHILDREN
NYTimes - about 18 years
Theater ''DE LA GUARDA,'' a spectacle that takes place with the performers overhead, swinging from the ceiling while harnessed to long tethers, will offer a special family matinee on Sunday at 3 P.M. The 65-minute work is presented without a stage, as the audience stands in a room like a crowd at a rock club; the music makes its way up to
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Freddie Bartholomew
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1992
    Age 67
    Bartholomew died from heart failure in Sarasota, Florida in January 1992, at the age of 67.
    More Details Hide Details The seven-minute Warner Bros. cartoon The Major Lied 'Til Dawn (1938) includes a caricature of Bartholomew as his Little Lord Fauntleroy role. Bartholomew was also caricatured, along many other Hollywood celebrities, in the eight-minute 1938 Disney cartoon Mother Goose Goes Hollywood – in this case as his character from the film Captains Courageous. Reflecting the movie, Freddie falls into the sea and is saved by Spencer Tracy's character. A non-alcoholic cocktail — a parallel of the Shirley Temple — which combines ginger ale with lime juice, known as a "Freddie Bartholomew cocktail", is named for the star. Although his name isn't mentioned, Freddie Bartholomew is referred to in J. D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye, as a figure whom Holden Caulfield looks like — specifically, Bartholomew's most iconic role as Harvey Cheyne in Captains Courageous (1937), referred to by the character Sunny as the kid in the movie "who falls off a boat".
  • 1991
    Age 66
    In 1991 he was filmed in several interview segments for the documentary film MGM: When the Lion Roars (1992).
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1977
    Age 52
    Bartholomew and Aileen divorced by early 1977.
    More Details Hide Details He eventually remarried again, and remained married to his third wife, Elizabeth, for the rest of his life. Suffering from emphysema, Bartholomew retired from television by the late 1980s. He eventually moved with his family to Bradenton, Florida.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1964
    Age 39
    In 1964 he was made a vice president of radio and television at the company.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1954
    Age 29
    In 1954, Bartholomew began working for Benton & Bowles, a top New York advertising agency, as a television producer and director.
    More Details Hide Details At Benton & Bowles, Bartholomew produced shows such as The Andy Griffith Show, and produced or directed several high-quality television soap operas including As the World Turns, The Edge of Night and Search for Tomorrow.
  • 1953
    Age 28
    Bartholomew divorced his first wife in 1953, and in December of that year he married television chef and author Aileen Paul, whom he had met at WPIX.
    More Details Hide Details With Aileen he had a daughter, Kathleen Millicent Bartholomew, born in March 1956, and a son, Frederick R. Bartholomew, born in 1958. The family, including stepdaughter Celia Ann Paul, lived in Leonia, New Jersey. This was an era in which advertising firms created and produced radio and television shows.
  • 1949
    Age 24
    Preferring to be known as Fred C. Bartholomew, he became the television director of independent television station WPIX in New York City from 1949 through 1954.
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    Upon his return to the United States in 1949, and in rather desperate circumstances, Bartholomew switched to the new and burgeoning medium of television.
    More Details Hide Details He shifted from performer to television host and director to television producer and executive.
  • 1948
    Age 23
    He spent most of 1948 touring small American theaters, and in November 1948 left without his wife for an Australian tour as a night-club singing, patter and piano act.
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  • 1947
    Age 22
    In 1947, Bartholomew appeared as himself in a five-minute cameo in the otherwise all-black musical film Sepia Cinderella, relating his post-war efforts to have a successful vaudeville routine and telling a few gags onscreen.
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  • 1946
    Age 21
    In 1946 he was in a radio play in an episode of Inner Sanctum Mystery.
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    After distressing experiences including a devastating auto accident and performing unsuccessfully in a play in Los Angeles, in 1946 Barthlomew married publicist Maely Daniele.
    More Details Hide Details Daniele, six years Bartholomew's senior, was a twice-divorced woman, and his marriage to her caused a serious and permanent rift with his aunt, who moved back to England. The marriage was not a happy one.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1944
    Age 19
    Bartholomew had one film role in 1944, in the low-budget comedy The Town Went Wild.
    More Details Hide Details The film reunited him with Jimmy Lydon, with whom he had starred in Tom Brown's School Days, Naval Academy, and Cadets on Parade. This ended up being Bartholomew's penultimate film performance, and his last for seven years. Bartholomew's efforts to revive his film career were unsuccessful; and efforts performing in regional theaters and vaudeville did not spark a comeback either.
    During training he fell and injured his back, was hospitalized for seven months and was discharged on January 12, 1944.
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  • 1943
    Age 18
    World War II military service interrupted Bartholomew's career even further. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Force on January 13, 1943, at the age of 18, and worked in aircraft maintenance.
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  • 1940
    Age 15
    For RKO distribution, he performed in Swiss Family Robinson and Tom Brown's School Days in 1940.
    More Details Hide Details And as World War II deepened, Columbia had him star in three military-related films: Naval Academy (1941), Cadets on Parade (1942), and Junior Army (1942).
  • 1938
    Age 13
    MGM then re-teamed him for the fourth and fifth times with Mickey Rooney in Lord Jeff (1938) and A Yank at Eton (1942), and he co-starred with Judy Garland in the lightweight MGM musical Listen, Darling in 1938.
    More Details Hide Details In 1939 Universal re-teamed him for the third and fourth times with Jackie Cooper in The Spirit of Culver and Two Bright Boys.
    In 1938, Twentieth Century Fox hired Bartholomew for the lead in their film of Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped.
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    This fall in popularity stemmed not only from the quality of the roles and his conflicts with MGM, but also from the fact that by late 1938 he was a tall, nearly 6-foot teenager, and the fact that the world was focusing on the growing problems of World War II and therefore the literary classics and costume dramas Bartholomew excelled at were less in fashion.
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  • 1937
    Age 12
    The extreme financial drain of his birth parents' ongoing custody battles prompted Bartholomew's aunt to demand a raise in his salary from MGM in July 1937, leveraged by the huge success of Captains Courageous.
    More Details Hide Details She threatened to break his MGM contract in order to find a better-paying studio. The contract battle kept Bartholomew out of work for a year, causing among other things the postponement and eventual loss of his planned lead in a film of Rudyard Kipling's Kim, and the loss of his planned lead in Thoroughbreds Don't Cry with Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney. Bartholomew eventually resumed acting through 1942, in mostly lesser-quality films and roles, only three out of 11 of which were with MGM, and after 1938 he was less popular than in his heyday.
  • 1936
    Age 11
    By April 1936, following the very popular Little Lord Fauntleroy, Bartholomew's success and level of fame caused his long-estranged birth parents to attempt to gain custody of him and his fortune.
    More Details Hide Details A legal battle of nearly seven years ensued, resulting in nearly all the wealth that Bartholomew amassed being spent on attorneys' and court fees, and payouts to his birth parents and two sisters.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1934
    Age 9
    Bartholomew and his aunt emigrated to the United States in August 1934, and MGM gave him a seven-year contract.
    More Details Hide Details David Copperfield, which also featured Basil Rathbone, Maureen O'Sullivan, W.C. Fields and Lionel Barrymore, was a success, and made Bartholomew an overnight star. He was subsequently cast in a succession of prestigious film productions with some of the most popular stars of the day. Among his successes of the 1930s were Anna Karenina (1935) with Greta Garbo and Fredric March; Professional Soldier (1935) with Victor McLaglen and Gloria Stuart; Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936) with Dolores Costello and C. Aubrey Smith; Lloyd's of London (1937) with Madeleine Carroll and Tyrone Power; The Devil is a Sissy (1936) with Mickey Rooney and Jackie Cooper; and Captains Courageous (1937) with Spencer Tracy. Captains Courageous, which contains Bartholomew's most iconic performance, was the movie he most enjoyed working on. The film took an entire year to make, and much of it was shot off the coasts of Florida and Catalina Island, California. Bartholomew said, "For a kid, it was like one long outing. Spencer Tracy, Lionel Barrymore, Mickey Rooney, Melvyn Douglas and I — we all grew very close toward one another in those 12 months. When the shooting was finished, we cried like a bunch of babies as we said our goodbyes."
  • 1930
    Age 5
    His first film role came by the age of six, in 1930.
    More Details Hide Details He also pursued acting studies at the Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts in London, and appeared in a total of four minor British films. American filmmakers George Cukor and David O. Selznick saw him on a 1934 scouting trip to London and chose him for the young title role in their MGM film David Copperfield (1935).
  • 1924
    Born
    Born on March 28, 1924.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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