Gene Krupa
Drummer, Composer, Bandleader
Gene Krupa
Eugene Bertram "Gene" Krupa was an American jazz and big band drummer and composer, known for his highly energetic and flamboyant style.
Biography
Gene Krupa's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Gene Krupa from around the web
"Concert for the Community" starring Lena Prima - Las Vegas Review - Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Q: Can you pull off "Sing Sing Sing" -- the big-band scorcher your dad wrote and the Benny Goodman band turned into a classic with Gene Krupa's legendary drum solo -- with a six-piece band? A: Oh yes. Our drummer, Mark Adams, he does a really great
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Chris Wright pays tribute to Eric Delaney - MusicRadar.com
Google News - over 5 years
To my mind, he was the ultimate showman drummer, the British equivalent of Gene Krupa, and sadly we will not see his like again. As Mike Dolbear comments on his website, if you were to mention his name in the company of younger drummers,
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Ask 411 Music 8.11.11: The Drum Battle Edition - 411mania.com
Google News - over 5 years
"We Are the Knuckleheads by The Bloodhound Gang How many recordings did Gene Krupa and Buddy Rich play on? What were there most famous records? That's way back. Even before my time and I'm as old as dirt. I'm assuming the nature of the question is how
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Whitesnake, last night at the Midland - Pitch Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
Drummer Brian Tichy later launched into a jaw-dropping exhibition that was equal parts John Bonham and Gene Krupa. Near the end, he tossed his sticks into the audience and played with his bare fists. With its strong lead single “Love Will Set You Free
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Richie OKon: Respect for the Jazz Club - JazzTimes Magazine
Google News - over 5 years
By the time I was seven, I'd seen the Benny Goodman Story; but seeing and hearing Gene Krupa is what really turned my world around. I wanted to be a drummer. That was it. Drum lessons in elementary school were 25 cents each
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Meet the Owner: Dreams Music Showcase - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Besides Ringo Starr, his favorite drummers include Buddy Rich, Gene Krupa, Ginger Baker, Chico Hamilton and Mitch Mitchell. Previous gigs: Besides gigging on the rock club circuit for over 20 years, Kellner has also worked as a paramedic and a Sam's
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AugustFest brings back old time rock 'n' roll - Tulsa World
Google News - over 5 years
I remember seeing Goodman and (American jazz and big band drummer) Gene Krupa and I told my dad 'I want to be that guy.' " He started playing the drums at 5 or 6, won an amateur talent competition on Paul Whiteman's "TV Teen Club," joined several
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Local drummer to perform 'Sing, Sing, Sing' Solo At Aug. 13 Big Band Dance - Crossville Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
Gene Krupa made the drum solo famous in 1938 at a Carnegie Hall concert in New York City, when he was with the Benny Goodman Band. Dancers will recognize it as a perfect example of a quickstep. Tickets for dancers and listeners, who would like to
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Stop the music: Caruso family pulls plug on Brookhaven business - Delaware County Daily Times
Google News - over 5 years
In another photo, world-famous jazz drummer Gene Krupa, whose second wife, Patricia Bowler was born in Chester, is performing at the Caruso brothers' studio in 1973. An entire wall is devoted to Marty Caruso, who was music director for former local TV
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Grooving with Granelli - TheChronicleHerald.ca
Google News - over 5 years
But he was also listening to drummers like Gene Krupa, and players like Louis Jordan and Duke Ellington. His uncle played that kind of music. His dad played swing and dixieland music. At eight he was winning rudimental drum contests against guys twice
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Im Zeichen des Swing - Main Post
Google News - over 5 years
Musiklegenden wie Louis Armstrong, Gene Krupa, Frances Langford und das Glenn-Miller-Orchester interpretieren die mitreißenden Melodien. Unter der Regie von Anthony Mann setzt der Film dem Meister des Swing ein Denkmal. Freigegeben ist der Film ab
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Backstage: Walter Salas-Humara on Florizona - Broward-Palm Beach New Times (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
It was here that he initially indulged his love of music, inspired to start playing drums after observing a Gene Krupa imitator on the streets of Little Havana. He later took up guitar and studied art at the University of Florida, where he formed the
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The beat of different drummers - Estevan Mercury
Google News - over 5 years
Many eons ago I had the opportunity to sit behind a full fledged drum set to see if I had the makings of a Ginger Baker, Gene Krupa or Ringo Starr. Nope, I wasn't even able to tinkle that territory. My foot pace on that pedal thing that makes that big
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What a Wonderful World of Jazz - Glen Cove Record Pilot
Google News - over 5 years
Napoleon has also played with musical greats Chico Marx, Charlie Ventura and Gene Krupa and is credited for starring alongside Krupa in the short film Follow that Music. The lively 90-year-old with a seemingly permanent smile and contagious spirit,
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Jersey Dreamers light up the day with big show - Tri-Town News
Google News - over 5 years
“Red, Hot and Blue” is a nostalgic musical journey from the 1940s to the 1960s, focusing on Frank Sinatra, “Jersey Boys” and “Grease,” the Glenn Miller band, Benny Goodman, Gene Krupa, and doowop music. Jersey Dreamers also offers an Italian festival
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TV On the Radio's Dave Sitek Takes On Dinah Washington Classic - antiMUSIC.com
Google News - over 5 years
LA Noire Remixed was released digitally May 17, 2011, and features six '30s-'40s gems from jazz greats Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Jordan, Dinah Washington, Gene Krupa and Lionel Hampton, remixed by Dave Sitek (TV on the Radio),
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Dick Dale still rules as 'King of the Surf Guitar' - NewsOK.com
Google News - over 5 years
“I have all the rhythm in my left hand, and I use the rhythms that Gene Krupa did on his drums,” Dale explained in a recent phone interview from the road. “Gene Krupa was my big hero, and I used to play on my mother's flour cans and sugar cans with the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Gene Krupa
    CHILDHOOD
  • 1973
    In 1973, Krupa died of leukemia and heart failure in Yonkers, New York, aged 64.
    More Details Hide Details He was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery in Calumet City, Illinois. In the 1930s, Krupa became the first endorser of Slingerland drums. At Krupa's urging, Slingerland developed tom-toms with tuneable top and bottom heads, which immediately became important elements of virtually every drummer's setup. Krupa developed and popularized many of the cymbal techniques that became standards. His collaboration with Armand Zildjian of the Avedis Zildjian Company developed the modern hi-hat cymbals and standardized the names and uses of the ride cymbal, crash cymbal, splash cymbal, pang cymbal, and swish cymbal. He is also credited with helping to formulate the modern drum set, being one of the first jazz drummers (for that recording studio) to use a bass drum, in a recording session in December 1927. One of his bass drums, a Slingerland 14 X 26, inscribed with Benny Goodman's and Krupa's initials, is preserved at the Smithsonian museum in Washington, D.C.
  • OTHER
  • 1959
    In 1959, The Gene Krupa Story was released theatrically in America.
    More Details Hide Details In 1978, Krupa became the first drummer inducted into the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame. Rhythm, the UK's best-selling drum magazine, voted Gene Krupa the third most influential drummer ever, in a poll conducted for its February 2009 issue. Voters included over 50 top-name drummers. Actor Gary Burghoff, of the TV series M*A*S*H, had been a friend of Krupa. In the episode "Showtime", the finale to Season One recorded in March 1973, Burghoff played a drum solo on the kit using a playing style modeled after Krupa. When Krupa died, he left a drum kit to Burghoff. Krupa wrote, or co-wrote, the following songs: "Some Like It Hot" (1939) with Frank Loesser and Remo Biondi, "Disc Jockey Jump" with Gerry Mulligan, "Manhattan Transfer" with Elton Hill, "Drum Boogie" with Roy Eldridge, "Drummin' Man", "Bolero at the Savoy" with Jimmy Mundy, "Feelin' Fancy", "He's Gone", "Wire Brush Stomp", "Jam on Toast", "The Big Do", "Murdy Purdy" with Jimmy Mundy, "Hard, Hard Roxy", pt. 2, "Full Dress Hop", "Swing is Here" with Chu Berry, "To Be or Not to Be-Bop", "Quiet and Roll 'Em" with Sam Donahue, "Sweetheart, Honey, Darlin' Dear", "Boogie Blues", "I Should Have Kept on Dreaming","Apurksody", "The Babe Takes a Bow", "Blues of Israel", "Blues Krieg". "Some Like It Hot" has been recorded by Charlie Barnet, Red Norvo, Nat King Cole, and Judy Ellington.
    Krupa remarried in 1959 to Patty Bowler.
    More Details Hide Details In 1943, Krupa was arrested for possession of two marijuana cigarettes and was given a 90-day jail sentence, of which he served 84 days. He was also charged with, but acquitted of, contributing to the delinquency of a minor. He was exonerated/acquitted of all charges when it was subsequently proven that the entire episode was a trumped-up "frame", as the prosecution's key witness was paid to falsely testify against Krupa. In the 1960s his house in Yonkers, New York was almost totally destroyed by fire. He continued to live in the parts of the house that were inhabitable.
    In 1959, the movie biography The Gene Krupa Story was released; Sal Mineo portrayed Krupa, and the film featured a cameo appearance by Red Nichols.
    More Details Hide Details During the 1950s Krupa often appeared at the Metropole, near Times Square in Manhattan. He continued to perform in famous clubs in the 1960s, including the Showboat Lounge in NW Washington DC. Increasingly troubled by back pain, he retired in the late 1960s and opened a music school. One of his pupils was Kiss drummer Peter Criss, whilst Jerry Nolan from The New York Dolls was another, as evidenced by the drumming similarities between Kiss's "100,000 Years" and The New York Dolls's "Jet Boy". Krupa occasionally played in public in the early 1970s until shortly before his death. One such late appearance occurred in 1972 at a jazz concert series sponsored by the New School in New York. Krupa appeared onstage with other well-known musicians including trumpeter Harry James and the younger jazz saxophonist Gerry Mulligan. The presumption was that the 500 or so audience members were drawn by Mulligan's contemporary appeal, but when, during the second tune, Krupa took a 16-bar break, the room erupted, the crowd leaping to its feet and creating a deafening roar of unanimous affection. In effect, Krupa remained a seminal performer up to his death, even while playing for a huge audience perhaps half his age.
  • 1954
    In 1954, Krupa returned to Hollywood to appear in such films as The Glenn Miller Story and The Benny Goodman Story.
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  • 1946
    He made a cameo appearance in the 1946 film The Best Years of Our Lives.
    More Details Hide Details His athletic drumming style, timing methods and cymbal technique evolved during this decade to fit in with changed fashions and tastes, but he never quite adjusted to the bebop style of jazz.
  • 1943
    In 1943, his arrest for possession of marijuana (see below) forced the breakup of his own orchestra and he rejoined Goodman's band for a year.
    More Details Hide Details As the 1940s ended, large orchestras fell by the wayside: Count Basie closed his large band and Woody Herman reduced his to an octet. Krupa gradually cut down the size of his own band in the late 1940s, and from 1951 on he led a trio or quartet, often featuring the multi-instrumentalist Eddie Shu on tenor sax, clarinet and harmonica. He appeared regularly in the Jazz at the Philharmonic concerts.
  • 1941
    He appeared in the 1941 film Ball of Fire, in which he and his band perform an extended version of the hit "Drum Boogie", sung by Barbara Stanwyck (whose singing was dubbed by Martha Tilton), which he had composed with trumpeter Roy Eldridge.
    More Details Hide Details As an encore to this piece, he plays a tamer version of the same song using matchsticks as drumsticks and a matchbox as a drum, while Stanwyck and the audience sing along.
  • 1938
    However, "artistic and personal disputes" with Goodman prompted Krupa to leave the group and form his own orchestra, shortly after the famous Carnegie Hall concert in January 1938.
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  • 1937
    The 1937 recording of Louis Prima's "Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)" by Benny Goodman and His Orchestra featuring Gene Krupa on drums was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1982.
    More Details Hide Details Book Revue, the 1945 Warner Brothers' Looney Tunes cartoon, included a rendition of "It Had To Be You," featuring caricatures of Harry James, Benny Goodman, and Gene Krupa.
  • 1934
    Krupa married Ethel Maguire twice: the first marriage lasted from 1934–1942; the second one dates from 1946 to her death in 1955.
    More Details Hide Details Their relationship was dramatized in the biopic about him.
    In December 1934, he joined Benny Goodman's band, where his featured drum work made him a national celebrity.
    More Details Hide Details His tom-tom interludes on their hit "Sing, Sing, Sing" were the first extended drum solos to be recorded commercially.
  • 1928
    Krupa also appeared on six recordings made by the Thelma Terry band in 1928.
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  • 1927
    Krupa made his first recordings in 1927, with a band under the leadership of Red McKenzie and guitarist Eddie Condon.
    More Details Hide Details Along with other recordings by musicians from the Chicago jazz scene such as Bix Beiderbecke, these recordings are examples of Chicago style jazz. The numbers recorded at that session were "China Boy", "Sugar", "Nobody's Sweetheart", and "Liza". The McKenzie-Condon recordings are notable for being early examples of the use of a bass drum AND snare drum/cymbals on recordings, at least for the studio where these recordings were made. Some of Krupa's big influences during this time were Father Ildefonse Rapp, Roy Knapp (both teachers of Gene). Later, there were cylinder recordings of African drumming that Gene intensely studied. Drummers such as Tubby Hall, Zutty Singleton and Baby Dodds contributed to Gene's developing his own sound. Press rolls were a fairly common technique in the early stages of Gene's development and, stylistically, this technique was, to some degree, evident in Krupa's playing well into the late 1940s and early 1950s. Gene absorbed every bit of what he heard and formulated his own 'style' very early in his career, pulling from hundreds of different sources. There were many other drummers (Ray Bauduc, Chick Webb, George Wettling, Dave Tough) whose work influenced Gene's approach to drumming and other instrumentalists and composers (Frederick Delius, for one) who strongly influenced Gene's entire approach to music.
    He broke into the Chicago scene in 1927, when he was picked by MCA to become a member of "Thelma Terry and Her Playboys", the first notable American jazz band—all-girl bands excepted—to be led by a female musician.
    More Details Hide Details The Playboys were the house band at The Golden Pumpkin nightclub in Chicago, and toured extensively throughout the eastern and central United States. Krupa was also affiliated with Glenn Miller's swing band in the 1940s.
  • 1909
    Born on January 15, 1909.
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