Gene Markey
Gene Markey
Eugene Willford "Gene" Markey was an American author, producer, screenwriter, and highly decorated naval officer.
Biography
Gene Markey's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Gene Markey
News
News abour Gene Markey from around the web
Hedy Lamarr, Sultry Star Who Reigned in Hollywood Of 30's and 40's, Dies at 86
NYTimes - about 17 years
Hedy Lamarr, the raven-haired Viennese beauty who became one of the reigning temptresses in Hollywood films in the 1930's and 40's, especially as Delilah vamping Victor Mature's Samson, was found dead in her home in Orlando, Fla., yesterday. She was 86. Miss Lamarr was forever identified with ''Ecstasy,'' a 1933 Czech film in which she appeared
Article Link:
NYTimes article
HORSE RACING: Calumet's Glittering Legacy Heads to Sale; Public Makes a Claim To a Stable's Trophies
NYTimes - over 18 years
One week ago, a moving van pulled up in front of the International Museum of the Horse at the Kentucky Horse Park here to take away some pieces of racing history and carry them to the ''21'' Club in midtown Manhattan. On the shipper's manifest were the glittering trophies won by thoroughbred racing's most legendary stable, Calumet Farm. The
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Myrna Loy, Model of Urbanity in 'Thin Man' Films, Is Dead at 88
NYTimes - about 23 years
Myrna Loy, the urbane actress who personified a liberated wife of intelligence and wry good humor in some of the best American movie comedies of the 1930's and 40's, died on Tuesday at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan. She was 88. She died in surgery after a long illness, said Sherlee Lantz, a longtime friend of Miss Loy. With a pert face, crinkly
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Myrna Loy, Model of Urbanity in 'Thin Man' Roles, Dies at 88
NYTimes - about 23 years
Myrna Loy, the urbane actress who personified a liberated wife of intelligence and wry good humor in some of the best American movie comedies of the 1930's and 40's, died yesterday at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan. She was 88. She died in surgery after a long illness, said Sherlee Lantz, a longtime friend of Miss Loy. With a pert face, crinkly
Article Link:
NYTimes article
ON HORSE RACING; Arcaro To Antley: You're Not Alone
NYTimes - over 25 years
At age 75, Eddie Arcaro is half a century older than Chris Antley. But the old master of the track can still feel for the young rider, who will be the most conspicuous absentee next Sunday when half a dozen or more of the best horses and jockeys in the land gather at Belmont Park for one of the season's racing classics, the Woodward Stakes. It is
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Joan Bennett, Whose Roles Ripened From Sweet to Siren, Dies at 80
NYTimes - about 26 years
Joan Bennett, an actress who matured from a winsome blonde ingenue in movies of the 1930's to a sensuous brunette femme fatale in film noir classics of the 1940's, died Friday evening at her home in Scarsdale, N.Y. She was 80 years old. She died of cardiac arrest, said her daughter, Shelley Wanger. Miss Bennett got her basic training playing
Article Link:
NYTimes article
AFFIRMED AND ALYDAR RAN INTO OUR HEARTS
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: AS Alysheba tries for the crown that eluded his father, horseplayers fondly push the memory button labeled ''Affirmed vs. Alydar.'' And once again, thoroughbred racing's most persistent adversaries come charging through the stretch. AS Alysheba tries for the crown that eluded his father, horseplayers fondly push the memory button labeled
Article Link:
NYTimes article
DERBY ENTHUSIAST'S WILL SETS BIG TRUST FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH
NYTimes - over 32 years
For years Lucille P. Markey, owner of Kentucky's famed Calumet Farm racing stables, listened to critics complaining that her thoroughbreds won too much and too often, and she typically retorted, ''I give to charity but not at the track.'' Mrs. Markey indeed gave to charity. The Lucille Markey Charitable Trust, created nine months ago under her
Article Link:
NYTimes article
NYTimes - over 33 years
The crowd at Belmont Park saw one of the best cards in the track's history yesterday. Besides the Belmont Stakes, there were four other stakes races. They were run as the fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh races, directly preceding the Belmont. In addition, the ninth-race triple payoff of $20,727 was the highest in New York this year. The race was
Article Link:
NYTimes article
HOPEFUL SIGNS FOR THE CALUMET TRADITION
NYTimes - over 34 years
When Lucille Parker Wright Markey died early Sunday morning, it seemed that an era in American thoroughbred racing might also have reached its end. Mrs. Markey had owned and operated Calumet Farm in Lexington, Ky., for more than five decades, either by herself or with one of the two husbands she survived. None of the five heirs who will inherit her
Article Link:
NYTimes article
LUCILLE PARKER MARKEY, 85, CALUMET FARM OWNER, DIES
NYTimes - over 34 years
Lucille Parker Markey, an owner of Calumet Farm who had long been synonymous with excellence in thoroughbred racing, died early yesterday morning of bronchial pneumonia in Miami. She was 85 years old and had been in poor health since suffering a stroke in 1977. Mrs. Markey was a Calumet owner for 51 years. Her first husband, Warren Wright,
Article Link:
NYTimes article
DESTRUCTION OF AN AILING HORSE CALLED A NECESSITY BY OWNER
NYTimes - over 35 years
Hugable Tom won the first time he raced, against maiden 2-year-olds at Aqueduct on Nov. 12, 1977. He won the last start of his career, as a 6-year-old gelding, running with a $35,000 claiming tag at Belmont last June 20. In all, he won 18 of 55 career starts, earning $271,804 and more than the usual affection from bettors, who considered him a
Article Link:
NYTimes article
VEITCH PLANNING 2d COMEBACK; Veitch Planning 2d Comeback
NYTimes - over 35 years
It was a nervous moment. Nine fractious 2-year-old colts were circling the walking ring in Belmont Park's paddock. Hundreds of undecided bettors crowded the rail of the ring, looking for some portent of how to wager on a race full of first-time starters. Several edgy trainers carefully watched each step taken by their young horses. But John Veitch,
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Gene Markey
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1980
    Age 84
    Admiral and Mrs. Markey remained married until his death after which in 1980, he was buried in the Lexington Cemetery in Lexington, Kentucky.
    More Details Hide Details His wife, Lucille Parker Wright, was buried next to him upon her death shortly thereafter in 1982.
  • 1965
    Age 69
    He also served as the model for the character played by Burgess Meredith in the 1965 film In Harm's Way, starring his good friend John Wayne.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1958
    Age 62
    On July 31, 1958, Admiral Markey was commissioned a Kentucky Colonel (a ceremonial rank) by Governor Albert Benjamin "Happy" Chandler, Sr..
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1952
    Age 56
    He returned to Hollywood after the war and, on September 27, 1952, he married his fourth wife, Lucille Parker Wright, the widow of Warren Wright, owner of the Calumet Farm racing stable.
    More Details Hide Details Markey left California after this marriage. He developed something of a knack for naming the farm's horses. First there was a filly, was named Our Mims after his daughter Melinda. Another was named Myrtle Morgan after the two streets that intersected in front of his property in Saratoga Springs, New York. Still another was named Eastern Fleet (possibly as a tribute to his service in the Navy) who would finish fourth in the 1971 Kentucky Derby and second in the Preakness Stakes. Markey was also a lover of dogs. He owned a black Labrador Retriever named Lucky that lived to be 17, which is very unusual. Mrs. Markey also had a dog, a Yorkshire Terrier that was named Timmy Tammy (after which she was thought to have named one of Calumet Farm's champion thoroughbreds, Tim Tam). Mrs. Markey carried the dog with her in her purse everywhere she went.
  • FORTIES
  • 1941
    Age 45
    In August 1941, he reported to Balboa, Panama with the rank of Lieutenant Commander.
    More Details Hide Details He had a yacht, Melinda (named after his daughter), that he donated to the United States Navy for use as a submarine chaser. During the war, Markey rose to the rank of Commodore and served as an assistant intelligence officer on the staff of Fleet Admiral William "Bull" Halsey at Guadalcanal. After the war, he was promoted to Rear Admiral and he officially retired from the Navy on February 27, 1956. He was highly decorated; among his awards were the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star with Combat V (for leading a reconnaissance mission in the Solomon Islands in 1942), a Navy Commendation Medal, Italy's Star of Solidarity, and France's Legion of Honor. During World War II, Markey became good friends with Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma. After the war, he became a Special Assistant to United States Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal. Markey was very proud of his Admiral's commission. He insisted on being called, "Admiral Markey" never "Mister Markey" and, rarely, "Gene". For the rest of his life, he would promptly toss ANY mail (including bills) that wasn't addressed to ADMIRAL Markey into the trash.
  • 1939
    Age 43
    He was married to Hedy Lamarr from 1939 to 1940 and to Myrna Loy from 1946 to 1950.
    More Details Hide Details At first, Loy claimed mental cruelty, but later retracted it, saying, "He could make a scrubwoman think she was a queen and he could make a queen think she was the queen of queens." After his graduation from Dartmouth, Markey became a lieutenant in the infantry during World War I (which the United States had entered in 1917) and saw action at the Battle of Belleau Wood. He then joined the U.S. Naval Reserve in 1920 and it was during World War II that he made his greatest mark.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1932
    Age 36
    His first wife was Joan Bennett, from 1932 to 1937 (which produced a daughter, Melinda).
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1929
    Age 33
    Soon after he arrived in Hollywood in 1929, it was also reported that, "Markey became the most sought after unattached man in the cinema firmament, so sprinkled with far handsomer, richer male stars."
    More Details Hide Details Markey was married three times to prominent film actresses.
    He went to Hollywood in 1929 and became a screenwriter for Twentieth Century Fox.
    More Details Hide Details His screen credits included King of Burlesque (1936) starring Alice Faye, Girls' Dormitory (1936) featuring Herbert Marshall, and On the Avenue (1937), starring Dick Powell, Madeleine Carroll, and Alice Faye. He was also the producer of the 1937 Shirley Temple film, Wee Willie Winkie, among others. Although he was not overly handsome, he was a very skilled conversationalist and he quickly became a popular fixture in Hollywood society. Among his good friends in Hollywood were producer John Hay Whitney, composer Irving Berlin, and actors Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Ward Bond and John Wayne. He would often go fishing with Bond and Wayne off Catalina Island. A 1946 article in the Washington Times Herald said, "Other Men Say: What's Gene Markey Got That We Haven't Got?" The article ran a photo of Rudolph Valentino with the caption, "NOT SO HOT – By Comparison. Though all American womanhood swooned over him in his day, Rudolph Valentino was no Markey."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1919
    Age 23
    He was a skilled sketch artist, which gained him entry, after World War I, into the Art Institute of Chicago starting in 1919 and finishing in 1920.
    More Details Hide Details There, he claimed to have "studied painting and learned nothing". After that, he worked as a journalist in Chicago for several newspapers and magazines, including Photoplay magazine. It was during the 1920s that Gene Markey first became a writer, specializing in novels about the Jazz Age. Among his titles were Anabel; Stepping High; Women, Women, Everywhere; and His Majesty's Pyjamas. His book "Literary Lights" (March 1923, Alfred A. Knopf, New York) was a collection of fifty of America's most important literary authors of the day. He personally sketched each caricature.
  • 1918
    Age 22
    He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1918.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1895
    Born
    Markey was born in Michigan in the year 1895.
    More Details Hide Details His father, Eugene Lawrence Markey, was a Colonel in the United States Army. His uncle, Daniel P. Markey, had been Speaker of the Michigan House of Representatives.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)