Gene Raymond
Actor, singer, composer, producer, director
Gene Raymond
Gene Raymond was an American film, television, and stage actor of the 1930s and 1940s. In addition to acting, Raymond was also a composer, writer, director, producer, and decorated military pilot.
Biography
Gene Raymond's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Gene Raymond
News
News abour Gene Raymond from around the web
Joan Crawford's star shines from comedies to dramas on TCM Aug. 22 - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Along the way she has a brief affair with aa ne'er-do-well nightclub patron (Gene Raymond), marries an alcoholic playboy (Edward Arnold) and eventually reunites with a childhood friend (Tone), who's made quite a life for himself
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Google News article
Homer-Center budget results in 9.2 mill increase - Blairsville Dispatch
Google News - over 5 years
In personnel matter, the board accepted the retirement resignation of Assistant High School Principal Gene Raymond, effective Sept. 17. Officials said the district doesn't intend to replace him. "Mr. Raymond has played a vital and necessary role,"
Article Link:
Google News article
Cleveland Evans: Hollywood prompts evolution of 'Shelby' - Omaha World-Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Both the down-on-his-luck Johnny Wyatt (Gene Raymond) and the wealthy Gene Fairchild (John Eldredge) fall in love with her. Shelby marries Johnny, but his debts lead her to secretly visit Gene on his yacht to ask for a loan
Article Link:
Google News article
THE BEST MAN: Sex Scandals and Politics at the Movies Pt. 3 - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Also in the Best Man cast: Edie Adams, Ann Sothern, Lee Tracy, Margaret Leighton, Kevin McCarthy, Shelley Berman, Gene Raymond, and Richard Arlen. The Best Man earned veteran Lee Tracy Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations in the Best Supporting
Article Link:
Google News article
At Large with Tom Williams > Glory days of the Gateway Theatre - Shore News Today
Google News - over 5 years
In future weeks and future seasons, the Gateway offered Donald Woods, Conrad Nagel, Betsy Von Furstenberg, Corinne Calvet, Tod Andrews, Gene Raymond, Constance Bennett and Sidney Blackmer, among many others. Barrymore Jr., the father of current
Article Link:
Google News article
What's On Today
NYTimes - over 8 years
6 A.M. (TCM) SUMMER UNDER THE STARS: BARBARA STANWYCKA daylong tribute to Stanwyck, beginning with ''Barbara Stanwyck: Fire and Desire,'' a 1991 documentary profile narrated by Sally Field. Stanwyck, who died in 1990, often played the seductress on screen. In ''Baby Face'' (1933), at 3:15 p.m., she stars as a conniving vixen who sleeps her way to
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NYTimes article
Milton Berle, TV's First Star As 'Uncle Miltie,' Dies at 93
NYTimes - almost 15 years
Milton Berle, the brash comedian who emerged from vaudeville, nightclubs, radio and films to become the first star of television, igniting a national craze for the new medium in the late 1940's, died yesterday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 93. The uninhibited Mr. Berle almost single-handedly led the entertainment revolution that addicted the
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NYTimes article
MOVIES: CRITIC'S CHOICE
NYTimes - about 16 years
IF ''O, Brother, Where Art Thou?'' doesn't convince you that George Clooney is the new Clark Gable, maybe a look back at RED DUST (1932) will. Gable was 31 in this, his first film with Jean Harlow, and, like Mr. Clooney these days, he's the picture of movie-starrish easy charm. Gable is also much more convincing in the role than when he reprised it
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NYTimes article
Loretta Young, Glamorous Leading Lady of Film and Television, Dies at 87
NYTimes - over 16 years
Loretta Young, the Academy Award-winning actress whose high cheekbones, pale skin and luminous eyes made her a reigning Hollywood beauty of the 1930's and 40's, died yesterday in Los Angeles. She was 87 and lived in Palm Springs, Calif. Miss Young, who won an Oscar as best actress for her performance in ''The Farmer's Daughter'' in 1947, later
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NYTimes article
MOVIES: CRITICS' CHOICE
NYTimes - almost 17 years
RICHARD GERE has never been better than in his scenes as a choreographer dying far too young in Roger Spottiswoode's AND THE BAND PLAYED ON (1993), made for HBO and one of the first mainstream films to deal with the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Ian McKellen is splendid as a San Francisco activist who works to bring attention to the epidemic
Article Link:
NYTimes article
MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 17 years
THE week's round-up of vintage films on television ranges far and wide - from an Indochinese rubber plantation to an African uprising, from an Irving Berlin musical set in San Francisco to an Oscar-winning World War II documentary in the skies over Germany. Victor Fleming's RED DUST (1932) cannily projects the sexual tensions on a rubber plantation
Article Link:
NYTimes article
MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 18 years
Although short on quality musicals, the movie line-up on television this week includes an early pulp vehicle for Joan Crawford, a lively scenic adventure and two unusual thrillers. The well-done Crawford showcase, SADIE MCKEE (1934), is about a working girl and the three men in her life: a middle-aged millionaire, played by Edward Arnold, a smooth
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Gene Raymond, Stage and Screen Actor, 89
NYTimes - almost 19 years
Gene Raymond, whose dashing blond looks led to a long career in theater, film and television, died on Sunday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 89. The cause was pneumonia, said his publicist, Esme Chandlee. He started on Broadway in 1920 at the age of 12 under his real name, Raymond Guion, but Hollywood rechristened him Gene
Article Link:
NYTimes article
MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - almost 21 years
SOME classics and near-classics of the 1930's and a later inside-Hollywood fable stand out on the week's movie menu. None - hooray! - are overshow, at least yet. King Vidor's 1931 STREET SCENE creaks a bit as an early, stagy talkie, till the explosive climax. It's a powerful slice of New York tenement life via Elmer Rice's hit drama, with fine cast
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NYTimes article
Ginger Rogers, Who Danced With Astaire and Won an Oscar for Drama, Dies at 83
NYTimes - almost 22 years
Ginger Rogers, the vivacious actress whose supple grace in the arms of Fred Astaire lifted the spirits of Depression-era moviegoers in some of the most elegantly romantic musical films ever made, died yesterday at her home in Rancho Mirage, Calif. She was 83. The blond, blue-eyed actress, who came out of Charleston contests and the vaudeville
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Gene Raymond
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1998
    Age 89
    On May 3, 1998, at age 89, Raymond died of pneumonia in Los Angeles, California.
    More Details Hide Details For his contribution to the motion picture and television industry, Gene Raymond has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame located at 7003 Hollywood Boulevard and 1704 Vine Street.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1968
    Age 59
    He remained in the United States Air Force Reserve following the war, retiring in 1968 as a colonel.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1943
    Age 34
    He was transferred back to the U.S. in 1943 and piloted a variety of aircraft, both bombers and fighters, in stateside duties.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1942
    Age 33
    He served as an observer aboard B-17 anti-submarine flights along the Atlantic coast before attending intelligence school and shipping out to England in July 1942.
    More Details Hide Details He served with the 97th Bomb Group before taking over as assistant operations officer in the VIII Bomber Command.
  • 1941
    Age 32
    He trained as a pilot for that eventuality, and after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, he was commissioned a lieutenant in the Army Air Forces.
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  • 1939
    Age 30
    Following the beginning of war in Europe in 1939, Raymond felt certain the U.S. would eventually enter the war.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1938
    Age 29
    Enraged, studio chief Mayer ordered MacDonald and Raymond to resume the appearance of a happily married couple, and, to demonstrate his power over their careers, he had Raymond blacklisted following his 1938 arrest.
    More Details Hide Details This is reflected in Raymond's cinematic roles. He made no film appearances between Stolen Heaven in 1938 and Cross-Country Romance in 1940. It would be a year later for his next role in Alfred Hitchcock's Mr. & Mrs. Smith. Prior to his arrest, he had averaged four films a year. Features: Short films: Citations Bibliography
  • 1937
    Age 28
    The book also claims that Louis B. Mayer engineered the 1937 marriage of MacDonald to Raymond—even though Mayer knew Raymond was bisexual—to prevent MacDonald from marrying Nelson Eddy.
    More Details Hide Details Mayer was concerned that a MacDonald-Eddy marriage would end in divorce because of their temperaments. He was worried a break-up would destroy his lucrative box office team. Mayer was also unhappy with Eddy's desire for MacDonald to at least semi-retire so they could have children. Shortly after their marriage, there were reports of physical abuse. When MacDonald appeared with facial bruises at a Hollywood party, Eddy went to Raymond's house and beat him senseless in his driveway, nearly killing him, an incident which was reported in the newspapers as Raymond suffering an accidental fall down a flight of stairs. In 1938, Raymond began sharing a house with a 19-year-old actor and was arrested on a morals charge after a vice raid on a homosexual nightclub, requiring MacDonald to bribe the authorities in order to obtain his release.
    Raymond married Jeanette MacDonald in 1937.
    More Details Hide Details They remained together until her death in 1965. In 1974, he married Nel Bentley Hees, who died in 1995. A 2001 biography of Nelson Eddy and MacDonald, Sweethearts by Sharon Rich, states that Raymond had affairs with men during his marriage to MacDonald. The book has documentation showing that Raymond was arrested three times for having sex with other men. This includes a photo of Raymond's arrest sheet in January 1938; a US Army nurse is named and quoted concerning his second arrest; and a retired Scotland Yard detective named Joe Sampson confirms the third arrest, which occurred in England during World War II.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1908
    Born
    Raymond was born Raymond Guion on August 13, 1908 in New York City.
    More Details Hide Details He attended the Professional Children's School while appearing in productions like Rip Van Winkle and Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch. His Broadway debut, at age 17, was in The Cradle Snatchers which ran two years. (The cast included Mary Boland, Edna May Oliver, and a young Humphrey Bogart.) His screen debut was in Personal Maid (1931). Another early appearance was in the multi-director If I Had a Million with W. C. Fields and Charles Laughton. With his blond good looks, classic profile, and youthful exuberance — plus a name change to the more pronounceable "Gene Raymond" — he scored in films like the classic Zoo in Budapest with Loretta Young, and a series of light RKO musicals, mostly with Ann Sothern. He wrote a number of songs, including the popular "Will You?" which he sang to Sothern in Smartest Girl In Town (1936). His wife, Jeanette MacDonald, sang several of his more classical pieces in her concerts and recorded one entitled "Let Me Always Sing".
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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