George Antheil
American musician
George Antheil
George Antheil was an American avant-garde composer, pianist, author and inventor whose modernist musical compositions explored the modern sounds – musical, industrial, mechanical – of the early 20th century. Spending much of the 1920s in Europe, Antheil returned to the US in the 1930s, and thereafter spent much of his time composing music for film scores and eventually, television. His compositions for the concert hall, ballet, and films became more tonal.
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Im Gehirn von Hedy Lamarr - Mobile Business
Google News - over 5 years
Zum Schluss noch ein versöhnlicher Blick auf Patente: Hedy Lamarr und George Antheil meldeten während des 2. Weltkriegs ein Frequenzsprungverfahren zum Patent an, dass in unserer Zeit zu den Schlüsseltechnologien der Mobilfunkbranche gehört
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Een vliegende start van het Nijmeegs Muziekzomerweekend - Nieuwsbank (persbericht) (abonnement)
Google News - over 5 years
In Ballet Mécanique, geschreven door de Amerikaans componist George Antheil naar aanleiding van de film van de Franse kunstenaar Fernand Léger, staan 4 vleugels en 8 slagwerkers op het podium en wordt gebruik gemaakt van het geluid van vliegtuigmotoren
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Zavalloni&Rebaudengo - TGCOM
Google News - over 5 years
Come sempre, i due riserveranno un particolare interesse al materiale di origine popolare, dagli autori americani - con i song degli anni Venti di Ives e del "bad boy of music" George Antheil e, scendendo lungo il continente Americano, con le canzoni
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El arte de escribir una nota - La Razón
Google News - over 5 years
Entre otros, se pueden ver multitud de páginas, que incluyen información del escultor rumano Constantin Brâncusi, que desarrolló su carrera en Francia, la fotógrafa alemana devanguardia Ilse Bing o el autor estadounidense George Antheil, el cual se
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Minnesota Orchestra's Season Opens With a Paulus and Paulus - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
The program includes two additional American works rooted in jazz, George Antheil's A Jazz Symphony and John Adams' Fearful Symmetries, and concludes with Ravel's colorful fantasia on a mesmerizing theme, Boléro. The concert is performed three times at
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Sexbombe in geheimer Mission - Spiegel Online
Google News - over 5 years
Ein Mann, der mehr als all ihre Affären und Ehen ihrem Leben eine völlig unerwartete Wendung geben sollte, war der Avantgarde-Komponist George Antheil. Lamarr lernte ihn 1940 auf einer Dinnerparty in Hollywood kennen. Die Schauspielerin, die sich sehr
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Classical review: Pressler at 87 - National Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Mark Fewer, a genre-bending violinist, offered George Antheil's wild (yet periodically lyrcial) Violin Sonata No. 2 with a barnstorming piano accompaniment by Jasmin Arakawa. Alexandru Sura proved to be a formidable cimbalom virtuoso, although I cannot
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Hedy Lamarr Was Not Just Another Pretty Face - Investor's Business Daily
Google News - over 5 years
In 1942 — a year into America's entry into the war — she and partner George Antheil won a patent for what they called a secret communications system to guide torpedoes. They conceived of frequency hopping — a technique for breaking up transmitted
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La parapsicología y la cuarta dimensión (I / II) - Pysn Pueblo y Sociedad Noticias
Google News - over 5 years
... Fiódor Dostoievski, Marcel Proust, HG Wells y Joseph Conrad, inspiró algunas obras musicales de Alexander Scriabin, Edgar Varèse y George Antheil y algunas obras plásticas de Pablo Picasso y Marcel Duchamp influyendo en el desarrollo del cubismo
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Roy King Named Director of Athletic Bands - LSUSports.net
Google News - over 5 years
As part of the 2011 College Band Directors National Association Conference in Seattle, McKinney presented a session on the wind music of George Antheil. His recording credits include projects with the University of Michigan Symphony Band, University of
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Hedy Lamarr, diva di Hollywood e scienziata in un libro di Edoardo Segantini - PubblicitaItalia
Google News - over 5 years
... grazie a testimonianze e documenti inediti, ricostruisce la vera storia della sua invenzione spiegando quali furono i meriti della diva e quale il ruolo giocato dal fisico Samuel Stuart McKeown e dal compositore d'avanguardia George Antheil
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Münchner Lenbachhaus: Mondrian und De Stijl - Badische Zeitung
Google News - over 5 years
El Lissitzkys neuartigen Raumvorstellungen gab das Magazin ebenso einen Resonanzraum wie dem italienischen Maler Gino Severini, dem deutschen Dada-Künstler Hans Richter, dem US-amerikanischen Komponisten George Antheil, dem österreichischen
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Geräusche wie vom Flugzeug - Nordwest-Zeitung
Google News - over 5 years
Doch mittenmang klotzt das „Ballet mécanique” von George Antheil mit Propellern, Sirenen, Geisterhand-Klavieren. Das Zeug musste her. Aus der Klavier-Nummer etwa konnte Hanusa sich nicht mit dem Hinweis herausstehlen, dass die Synchronisation der vier
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Aquel chico malo - Diario de Sevilla
Google News - over 5 years
Cuando George Antheil (Trenton, Nueva Jersey, 1900 - Nueva York, 1959) llega a Europa en 1922 lo hace con fama de virtuoso del piano, pero él, apoyado por una poderosa mecenas americana, Mary Louise Curtis Bok, fundadora del famoso Curtis Institute of
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La techno, une musique qui dér ange (encore)… - Politis
Google News - over 5 years
... des avant-gardes artistiques du XXe siècle – en musique, les exemples remontent au manifeste l'Art des bruits de Russolo en 1913, ainsi qu'à des ballets des années 1920, comme Relâche d'Erik Satie ou le Ballet mécanique de George Antheil »
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Menschen und Götter - derStandard.at
Google News - over 5 years
Die Wiener Kammeroper hat in ihrer dritten Produktion zwei Kurzwerke zusammengespannt: Le pauvre matelot von Darius Milhaud (Libretto: Jean Cocteau) und Venus in Africa, einen Einakter des US-Amerikaners George Antheil. In der "Complainte" (Moritat)
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Hilary e Valentina, duo femminile in musica - Estense.com
Google News - almost 6 years
1 di George Antheil, un altro compositore americano contemporaneo, nella quale si incontrano minimalismo e rockn'roll, fusi in una forma classica. Hilary Hahn è nata a Lexington negli Stati Uniti nel 1979. Si è poi trasferita a Baltimora dove ha
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of George Antheil
    FIFTIES
  • 1959
    Age 58
    Died on February 12, 1959.
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  • 1954
    Age 53
    In 1954, Antheil created a modified version of the work for percussion, four pianos, and a recording of an airplane motor.
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  • 1953
    Age 52
    His 1953 opera Volpone was premiered in New York in 1953 to mixed reviews, while a visit to Spain in the 1950s influenced some of his last works, including the film score for The Pride and the Passion (1957).
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  • FORTIES
  • 1945
    Age 44
    In 1945, he published his autobiography Bad Boy of Music, which became a bestseller.
    More Details Hide Details Antheil wrote a nationally syndicated newspaper relationship advice column, as well as regular columns in magazines such as Esquire and Coronet. He considered himself an expert on female endocrinology, and wrote a series of articles about how to determine the availability of women based on glandular effects on their appearance, with titles such as "The Glandbook for the Questing Male". Another book of "glandular criminology" was titled "Every Man His Own Detective". Antheil's interest in this area brought him into contact with the actress Hedy Lamarr, who sought his advice about how she might enhance her upper torso. He suggested glandular extracts, but their conversation then moved on to torpedoes. During World War II Lamarr, who was fiercely pro-American, realized that a single radio-controlled torpedo could severely damage or sink enemy ships causing irreparable damage. However these radio-controlled torpedoes could easily be detected and jammed, by broadcasting interference at the frequency of the control-signal, thereby causing the torpedo to go off course.
  • 1942
    Age 41
    On 11 August 1942, U.S. Patent 2,292,387 was granted to Antheil and "Hedy Kiesler Markey", Lamarr's married name at the time.
    More Details Hide Details This early version of frequency hopping, though novel, soon met with opposition from the U.S. Navy and was not adopted. The idea was not implemented in the USA until 1962, when it was used by U.S. military ships during a blockade of Cuba after the patent had expired. Perhaps owing to this lag in development, the patent was little known until 1997, when the Electronic Frontier Foundation gave Lamarr a belated award for her contributions. In 1998, an Ottawa wireless technology developer, Wi-LAN Inc., acquired a 49% claim to the long expired patent from Lamarr for an undisclosed amount of stock (Eliza Schmidkunz, Inside GNSS). Lamarr's and Antheil's frequency-hopping scheme shares some concepts with modern spread-spectrum communication technology, such as Bluetooth, COFDM used in Wi-Fi network connections, and CDMA used in some cordless and wireless telephones. Blackwell, Martin, and Vernam's 1920 patent Secrecy Communication System (1598673) seems to lay the communications groundwork for Kiesler and Antheil's patent, which employed the techniques in the autonomous control of torpedoes.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1940
    Age 39
    George's younger brother was Henry W. Antheil, Jr. He became a diplomatic courier and died on June 14, 1940, when his plane was shot down over the Baltic Sea.
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  • 1936
    Age 35
    He was the film music reporter and critic for the magazine Modern Music from 1936 to 1940, writing columns considered lively and thoughtful, noting the comings and goings of musicians and composers during an era when the industry was flirting with more "modern" scores for films.
    More Details Hide Details He was disappointed, however, and wrote that "Hollywood, after a grand splurge with new composers and new ideas, has settled back into its old grind of producing easy and sure-fire scores." Before World War II, he participated in the Hollywood Anti-Nazi League, putting on exhibits of artworks banned in Nazi Germany such as those by Käthe Kollwitz. He also published a book of war predictions, entitled The Shape of the War to Come.
    In 1936 Antheil travelled to Hollywood, where he became a sought-after film composer, writing more than thirty scores for such directors as Cecil B. DeMille and Nicholas Ray, including The Scoundrel (1935) and The Plainsman (1936).
    More Details Hide Details The Antheils' only child, a son, was born in 1937. However, Antheil found the industry hostile to modern music, complaining that it was a "closed proposition", and describing most background scores as "unmitigated tripe". He became increasingly dependent on more independent producers such as Ben Hecht to give him work, such as Angels Over Broadway (1940) and Specter of the Rose (1946). He also wrote the score for the independent film Dementia (1955) and In a Lonely Place (1950) starring Humphrey Bogart. Antheil was confident in his ability of his music to save a weak film. "If I say so myself I've saved a couple of sure flops," he said. Besides writing scores for movies, he continued to compose other music, including music for the ballet and six symphonies; his later works were in a more romantic style and influenced by Prokofiev and Shostakovich, as well as American music including jazz. Works such as Serenade No. 1, Piano Sonata No. 4, Songs of Experience and Eight Fragments from Shelley, written in 1948 showed a self-described desire "to disassociate myself from the passé modern schools of the last half-century, and to create a music for myself and those around me which has no fear of developed melody, real development itself, tonality, or other understandable forms."
  • 1933
    Age 32
    In 1933, the rise of the Nazi party made Antheil's avant-garde music unwelcome in Germany, and at the height of the Depression, he returned to the US and settled in New York City.
    More Details Hide Details He reentered American life with enthusiasm, organizing concerts, working on committees with Aaron Copland and Wallingford Riegger, and writing piano, ballet and film scores as well as an opera Helen Retires about Helen of Troy; the latter proved a flop. His music had moved away from more extreme aspects of modernism, and more tonal, neo-romantic aspects were by now discernible in his work.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1930
    Age 29
    In 1930, he premiered his first opera Transatlantic.
    More Details Hide Details This work, which involved American politics and gangsters, was a success at the Frankfurt Opera.
  • 1927
    Age 26
    On April 10, 1927, Antheil rented New York's Carnegie Hall in order to present an entire concert devoted to his works including the American debut of Ballet Mécanique in a scaled-down version.
    More Details Hide Details He commissioned elaborate backdrops of skyscrapers and machines, and engaged an African American orchestra to premiere his A Jazz Symphony. The concert started well, but according to the concert's promoter and producer when the wind machine was turned on "all hell, in a minor way, broke loose." During the gale, audience members clutched their programs and their hats, one "tied a handkerchief to his cane and waved it wildly in the air in a sign of surrender." Much to the amusement of the audience, the untested siren failed to sound on cue, despite frantic cranking and reached its climax only after the end of the performance, as the audience were clapping and leaving the hall. American critics were hostile, calling the concert "a bitter disappointment" and dismissing the Ballet Mécanique as "boring, artless, and naive" and Antheil's hoped-for riots failed to materialize. The failure of the Ballet Mécanique affected him deeply, and he never fully recovered his reputation during his lifetime, though his interest in the mechanical was emulated by other prominent composers such as Arthur Honegger, Sergei Prokofiev, and Erik Satie.
  • 1925
    Age 24
    The first productions of Antheil's work in 1925 and 1926 did not include the film, which turned out to last around 19 minutes, only half as long as Antheil's score.
    More Details Hide Details Antheil described his "first major work" as "scored for countless numbers of player pianos. All percussive. Like machines. All efficiency. No LOVE. Written without sympathy. Written cold as an army operates. Revolutionary as nothing has been revolutionary." Antheil's original conception was scored for 16 specially synchronized player pianos, two grand pianos, electronic bells, xylophones, bass drums, a siren and three airplane propellers, but difficulties with the synchronization resulted in a rewrite for a single pianola and multiple human pianists. The piece consisted of periods of music and interludes of silence set against the roar of the airplane propellers. Antheil described as "by far my most radical work... It is the rhythm of machinery, presented as beautifully as an artist knows how." The Léger-Murphy film and Antheil's score were finally performed together at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1935.
    He met Boski Markus, a Hungarian and niece of the Austrian playwright Arthur Schnitzler who became his companion and whom he married in 1925.
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  • 1924
    Age 23
    In 1924 Pound published Antheil and the Treatise on Harmony, as part of his campaign to boost Antheil's reputation.
    More Details Hide Details The book may have done Antheil more harm than good, and the composer was to distance himself from it in his memoir. Natalie Barney helped produce some original works, including the First String Quartet in 1925. Antheil was asked to make his Paris debut at the opening of the Ballets suédois, an important Paris social event. He programmed several recent compositions, including the "Airplane Sonata", the "Sonata Sauvage" and "Mechanism". Halfway through his performance a riot broke out, much to Antheil's delight. According to Antheil "People were fighting in the aisles, yelling, clapping, hooting! Pandemonium! The riot was filmed and may in fact have been engineered, as the Marcel L'Herbier movie L'Inhumaine needed a riot scene set in a concert hall. In the audience were Erik Satie, Darius Milhaud, Man Ray, Pablo Picasso, Jean Cocteau, and Francis Picabia. Antheil was delighted when Satie and Milhaud praised his music.
  • 1923
    Age 22
    The Antheils finally arrived in Paris in June 1923, in time to attend the premiere of Stravinsky's ballet Les Noces, but the relationship with Stravinsky did not survive for long.
    More Details Hide Details Stravinsky snubbed the younger man, having discovered that Antheil had boasted that "Stravinsky admired his work". The breach devastated Antheil, and was not ultimately repaired until 1941, when Stravinsky sent the family tickets to a concert he was giving in Hollywood. Despite the inauspicious beginning, Antheil found Paris, at the time a center of musical and artistic innovation, to be a "green tender morning" compared to the "black night" of Berlin. The couple lived in a one bedroom apartment above Sylvia Beach's bookshop Shakespeare and Company. Beach described him "as fellow with bangs, a squished nose and a big mouth with a grin in it. A regular American high school boy." She was very supportive, and introduced Antheil to her circle of friends and customers including Erik Satie, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, Virgil Thomson and Ernest Hemingway. Joyce and Pound were soon talking of an opera collaboration. Pound, in particular, was to become an extravagant supporter and promoter of Antheil and his work, comparing him variously to Stravinsky and James Cagney, and describing him as breaking down music to its "musical atom". Pound introduced Antheil to Jean Cocteau who in turn helped launch Antheil into the musical salons of Paris, and commissioned him to write three violin sonatas for his companion, Olga Rudge.
  • 1922
    Age 21
    In the fall of 1922, Antheil took advantage of a chance meeting to introduce himself to his idol Stravinsky in Berlin.
    More Details Hide Details They established a warm intimacy and the more established composer encouraged Antheil to move to Paris. He went as far as arranging a concert to launch Antheil's career in the French capital, but the younger man failed to show up, preferring to travel to Poland with Markus.
    On May 30, 1922, at the age of 21, Antheil sailed for Europe to make his name as "a new ultra-modern pianist composer" and a "futurist terrible"."
    More Details Hide Details He had engaged Leo Ornstein's manager, and opened his European career with a concert at Wigmore Hall. The concert featured works by Claude Debussy and Stravinsky, as well as his own compositions. He spent a year in Berlin, planning to work with Artur Schnabel, and gave concerts in Budapest, Vienna and at the Donaueschingen Festival. As he had desired, he achieved notoriety, but often had to pay the concert expenses out of his own pocket. His financial situation was not helped by Mrs. Bok's reduction of his stipend by 50 percent, though she often responded to requests to fund specific aspects of his concerts.
  • 1921
    Age 20
    Antheil continued his piano studies, and the study of modernist compositions, such as those by Igor Stravinsky and members of the Les Six group of French composers. In 1921, he wrote his first in a series of technology-based works, the solo piano Second Sonata, "The Airplane".
    More Details Hide Details Other works in the group included the Sonata Sauvage (1922–3) and subsequently Third Sonata, "Death of Machines" (1923), "Mechanisms" (ca 1923), both composed in Europe. He also worked on his first symphony, managing to attract Leopold Stokowski to premiere it. Before the performance could take place, Antheil left for Europe to pursue his career. This may have diminished his chances for success in his native country.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1919
    Age 18
    In 1919, he began to work with the more progressive Ernest Bloch in New York.
    More Details Hide Details Initially Bloch had been skeptical and had rejected him, describing Antheil's compositions as "empty" and "pretentious"; however, the teacher was won over by Antheil's enthusiasm and energy, and helped him financially as he attempted to complete an aborted first symphony. Antheil's trips to New York also permitted him to meet important figures of the modernist movement, including the musicians Leo Ornstein and Paul Rosenfeld, the painter John Marin, photographer Alfred Stieglitz, and Margaret Anderson, editor of The Little Review. At age 19, Antheil was invited to spend the weekend with Anderson and a group of friends; he stayed six months, and the close-knit group, who included Georgette Leblanc, former companion of Maurice Maeterlinck, were to become influential in Antheil's career. Anderson described Antheil as short with an oddly shaped nose, who played "a compelling mechanical music", and used "the piano exclusively as an instrument of percussion, making it sound like a xylophone or a cymballo." Intensely engaged in his music, during this period Antheil worked on songs, a piano concerto and a work that came to be known as "the Mechanisms".
  • 1916
    Age 15
    Antheil started studying the piano at the age of six. In 1916 he traveled regularly to Philadelphia to study under Constantine von Sternberg, a former pupil of Franz Liszt.
    More Details Hide Details From Sternberg he received formal composition training in the European tradition, but his trips to the city also exposed him to conceptual art, including Dadaism.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1900
    Born
    Born on July 8, 1900.
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