Georges Simenon
author
Georges Simenon
Georges Joseph Christian Simenon was a Belgian writer. A prolific author who published nearly 200 novels and numerous short works, Simenon is best known for the creation of the fictional detective Maigret.
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Dirty Snow, By Georges Simenon (trs Marc Romano and Louise Varese) - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Georges Simenon is reasonably well-known as the Belgian author of the Maigret detective stories, but deserves to be a good deal more famous than he is. He wrote many other novels (nearly 200), displaying acute psychological insight and a distinctive
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Cada hombre es un mundo - Diario El País
Google News - over 5 years
LA PRIMERA novela de la serie protagonizada por el comisario Maigret, escrita por Georges Simenon, fue Pietr, le leton, de 1931. En español circuló como Pedro, el letón, pero también como La muerte ronda a Maigret, un título más cercano a la estética
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Week-end roman noir : hommage à Simenon - Midi Libre
Google News - over 5 years
Samedi à 17 h, au château, séance cinéma, avec la projection d'un film d'Henri Decoin "Les inconnus dans la maison" (1942), d'après le roman de Georges Simenon. Ecrivain belge de langue française, né à Liège en 1903, Georges Simenon est l'un des
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L'assassino - Libri Blog (Blog)
Google News - over 5 years
New entry della classifica dei libri più venduti del 16 agosto 2011, L'assassino è uno dei libri più apprezzati di Georges Simenon, lo scrittore belga autore di numerosi romanzi e noto per aver delineato il personaggio, prima letterario e
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Liège: bientôt un espace dédié à Simenon? - RTBF
Google News - over 5 years
L'avenir d'un futur espace permanent dédié au romancier Georges Simenon se précise à Liège. Une société belge, spécialisée dans la scénographie de grandes expositions muséales, vient d'être désignée pour réaliser une étude sur les grandes orientations
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Ireland, with sleuth Quirke, stars in tale of tycoon's death - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
Banville is new to writing crime (his conversion came when he read a few of Georges Simenon's non-Maigret "hard novels" in 2003), and he has strangely constricted ideas of its possibilities. "For some reason," he has said, "the conventions of crime
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The Bat Segundo Show: John Banville & Benjamin Black - Reluctant Habits
Google News - over 5 years
... the decline of Beckett's reputation in recent years, Donald Westlake's Memory, the Parker novels, Georges Simenon, The Postman Always Rings Twice and Ulysses as respective masterpieces, Joanna Kavenna's recent New Yorker essay, thematic commitment,
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What's in a name? - Foyles
Google News - over 5 years
Georges Simenon wrote pulp fiction variously under Christian Brulls, Jean du Perry, Gom Gut, Jacques Dersonne and many more before he decided it was about time he was recognised as himself, which coincided with the conception of Maigret;
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El amor de Nicolas Sarkozy por los clásicos: ¿es real o estrategia electoral? - El Universal (Venezuela)
Google News - over 5 years
El presidente quiere aprovechar sus actuales vacacaciones en la Costa Azul para hacer deporte, pasar tiempo con su esposa y leer libros de Georges Simenon. Paris.- El presidente francés, Nicolas Sarkozy, nuncá escondió su inclinación por las películas
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Boyd Tonkin: Harry Potter and the magic brand - The Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Chorion has in its portfolio the estates of Agatha Christie, Enid Blyton, Raymond Chandler and Georges Simenon, not to mention rights to Paddington Bear, Peter Rabbit and The Snowman. The firm aims to identify the "Brand DNA" for each of its properties
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Georges Postel face à ses lecteurs - Sud Ouest
Google News - over 5 years
... directeur pour l'Europe de Weyerhaeuser (construction), ingénieur-conseil chez Sema Metra, et enfin chez Brooks ce grand admirateur de Georges Simenon et d'Agatha Christie a, à 68 ans, commencé une nouvelle vie : celle d'auteur de roman policier
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La personalidad integradora del coréografo francés Roland Petit - Hechos de Hoy
Google News - over 5 years
Considerado como el heredero del ruso Serge Diaghilev -el más grande coreógrafo del XX-, Petit empleó la literatura de Jean Cocteau, de Jean Anouilh o Georges Simenon, el cine de Orson Welles, el arte de Pablo Picasso, los diseños de Yves Saint-Laurent ... - -
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goodbye, Mr Goon - Calcutta Telegraph
Google News - over 5 years
It is only with Georges Simenon's meticulous Jules Maigret, Ngaio Marsh's handsome Roderick Alleyn and PD James's brooding Adam Dalgliesh and others of the same fictional police detective tribe that the clever and active policeman slides into hero
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Lire ou ne pas lire ? - Le Point
Google News - over 5 years
Une meilleure compagnie que Fedor Dostoïevski à Nice, Henry James à Athènes, William Faulkner à Tokyo, Simone de Beauvoir à Brazzaville, Thomas Mann à Belgrade, Georges Simenon à Berlin ? N'ont jamais de courses à faire dans les grands magasins locaux
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La banalità del male colpisce il martedì - La Gazzetta del Mezzogiorno
Google News - over 5 years
Hans Kuperus è uno dei magnifici volti che affollano la vasta galleria della «commedia umana» descritta da Georges Simenon nei suoi romanzi cosiddetti «duri»; l'ultimo di questi ritratti è ora presentato in Italia dall'editrice Adelphi,
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'Nom de Plume' and 'A Death in Summer' skillfully unearth secrets - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
Sylvia Plath used an invented byline and so did Georges Simenon. Two of the language's greatest writers — Samuel Clemens and Eric Blair — are better known by their pen names: Mark Twain and George Orwell. The authors she profiles, Ciuraru writes,
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George Simenon, exposé au Musée des lettres et manuscrits de Bruxelles - MyBoox
Google News - over 5 years
"Parmi les Belges célèbres, trois sont connus dans le monde entier : Hergé, Jacques Brel et Georges Simenon, annonce Gérard Lhéritier, qui s'apprête à inaugurer le deuxième Musée des lettres et manuscrits à Bruxelles. Il était tout naturel pour (ce)
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Sleuthing its way around Irish crime - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
Banville, in his references to Georges Simenon, clearly acknowledges the potential of crime writing to achieve the quality of art but, in describing his work as Benjamin Black, admits to getting “a craftsman's pleasure” but not “artistic pleasure”
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Simenon-Staffel 9 - FAZ - Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Google News - over 5 years
Außer seinen 75 Maigret-Romanen hat Georges Simenon auch 140 andere geschrieben, in denen der Kommissar keine Rolle spielt. 50 von ihnen erscheinen nun in revidierter Übersetzung. Tilman Spreckelsen liest mit. Sprechende Namen - Simenons Werk,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Georges Simenon
    TEENAGE
  • 1989
    The ambiguities of the war years notwithstanding, the city of La Rochelle eventually honored Simenon, naming a quay after him in 1989.
    More Details Hide Details Simenon was too ill to attend the dedication ceremony. However, in 2003, his son Johnny participated in another event honoring his father.
  • 1988
    He gave his last televised interview in December 1988.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1984
    Simenon underwent surgery for a brain tumor in 1984 and made a good recovery.
    More Details Hide Details In subsequent years however, his health worsened.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1978
    His long-troubled daughter Marie-Jo committed suicide in Paris in 1978 at the age of 25, an event that darkened Simenon's later years.
    More Details Hide Details The documentary film The Mirror of Maigret by director/producer John Goldschmidt was filmed at Simenon's villa in Lausanne and was a profile of the man based on his confessional dialogue with a criminal psychologist. The film was made for ATV and shown in the UK on the ITV Network in 1981.
  • 1977
    In 1977 he claimed that he had had sex with 10,000 women in the 61 years since his 13th birthday.
    More Details Hide Details Simenon was one of the most prolific writers of the twentieth century, capable of writing 60 to 80 pages per day. His oeuvre includes nearly 200 novels, over 150 novellas, several autobiographical works, numerous articles, and scores of pulp novels written under more than two dozen pseudonyms. Altogether, about 550 million copies of his works have been printed. He is best known, however, for his 75 novels and 28 short stories featuring Commissaire Maigret. The first novel in the series, Pietr-le-Letton, was serialized in 1930 and appeared in book form in 1931; the last one, Maigret and Monsieur Charles, was published in 1972. The Maigret novels were translated into all major languages and several of them were turned into films and radio plays. Two television series (1960–63 and 1992–93), have been made in Great Britain (the first with Rupert Davies in the title role, the second with Michael Gambon), one in Italy in four different seasons for a total of 36 episodes (1964–72) starring Gino Cervi and two in France: (1967–1990) starring Jean Richard and (1991–2005) starring Bruno Cremer.
  • OTHER
  • 1964
    Simenon and Denyse Ouimet separated definitively in 1964.
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  • 1963
    After living in a rented house in Echandens, in 1963 he purchased a property in Epalinges, north of Lausanne, where he had an enormous house constructed to his own design.
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  • 1961
    Teresa, who had been hired by Simenon as a housekeeper in 1961, had by this time become romantically involved with him and remained his companion for the rest of his life.
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  • 1955
    Simenon and his family returned to Europe in 1955, first living in France (mainly on the Côte d'Azur) before settling in Switzerland.
    More Details Hide Details
    In accordance with the divorce agreement, Tigy continued to live in close proximity to Simenon and their son Marc, an arrangement that continued until they all returned to Europe in 1955.
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  • 1952
    In 1952, Simenon paid a visit to Belgium and was made a member of the Académie Royale de Belgique.
    More Details Hide Details Although he never resided in Belgium after 1922, he remained a Belgian citizen throughout his life.
  • 1950
    Simenon and Denyse Ouimet were then married in Reno, Nevada in 1950 and eventually had three children, Johnny (born in 1949), Marie-Jo (born in 1953) and Pierre (born in 1959).
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  • 1949
    After resolving numerous legal difficulties, Simenon and Tigy were divorced in 1949.
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    He and Tigy remained married until 1949, but it was now a marriage in name only.
    More Details Hide Details Despite Tigy's initial protests, Boule remained with the family.
  • 1945
    In the meantime, Simenon had met Denyse Ouimet, a woman seventeen years his junior. Denyse, who was originally from Montréal, met Simenon in New York City in 1945 (she was to be hired as a secretary) and they promptly began an often stormy and unhappy relationship.
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    Simenon escaped questioning in France and in 1945 arrived, along with Tigy and Marc, in North America.
    More Details Hide Details He spent several months in Quebec, Canada, north of Montreal, at Domaine L'Esterel (Ste-Marguerite du Lac Masson) where he lived in a modern-style house and wrote three novels (one of which was Three Bedrooms in Manhattan) in one of the log cabins (LC5, still there today). Boule, due to visa difficulties, was initially unable to join them. During the years he spent in the United States, Simenon regularly visited New York City. He and his family also went on lengthy car trips, traveling from Maine to Florida and then west as far as California. Simenon lived for a short time on Anna Maria Island near Bradenton, Florida before renting a house in Nogales, Arizona where Boule was finally reunited with him. His novel The Bottom of the Bottle was heavily influenced by his stay in Nogales, Arizona.
  • 1938
    At the beginning of 1938, he rented the villa Agnès in La Rochelle, and published La Suspect, and then, in August, purchased a farm house in Nieul-sur-Mer (also in the Charente-Maritime) where his and Tigy's only child, Marc, was born in 1939.
    More Details Hide Details Simenon lived in the Vendée during the Second World War. Simenon's conduct during the war is a matter of considerable controversy, with some scholars inclined to view him as having been a collaborator with the Germans while others disagree, viewing Simenon as having been an apolitical man who was essentially an opportunist but by no means a collaborator. Further confusion stems from the fact that he was denounced as a collaborator by local farmers while at the same time the Gestapo suspected him of being Jewish, apparently conflating the names "Simenon" and "Simon". In any case, Simenon was under investigation at the end of the war because he had negotiated film rights of his books with German studios during the occupation and in 1950 was sentenced to a five-year period during which he was forbidden to publish any new work. This sentence, however, was kept from the public and had little practical effect.
  • 1932
    Between 1932 and 1936, Simenon, Tigy, and Boule lived at La Richardière, a 16th-century manor house in Marsilly at the Charente-Maritime département.
    More Details Hide Details The house is evoked in Simenon's novel Le Testament Donadieu.
    1932 saw Simenon travel extensively, sending back reports from Africa, eastern Europe, Turkey, and the Soviet Union.
    More Details Hide Details A trip around the world followed in 1934 and 1935.
  • 1930
    In 1930, the most famous character invented by Simenon, Commissaire Maigret, made his first appearance in a piece in Detective written at Joseph Kessel's request.
    More Details Hide Details This first ever Maigret detective story was written while boating in The Netherlands, particularly in and around the Dutch town of Delfzijl. A statue of Maigret in Delfzijl is a perpetual reminder of this.
  • 1929
    In 1929, he decided to have a boat built, the Ostrogoth.
    More Details Hide Details Simenon, Tigy, their cook and housekeeper Henriette Liberge, and their dog Olaf lived on board the Ostrogoth, travelling the French canal system. Henriette Liberge, known as "Boule" (literally "Ball," a reference to her slight pudginess) was romantically involved with Simenon for the next several decades and would remain a close friend of the family, really part of it.
  • 1928
    A reporting assignment had Simenon on a lengthy sea voyage in 1928, giving him a taste for boating.
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  • 1923
    Simenon and Tigy returned briefly to Liège in March 1923 to marry.
    More Details Hide Details Despite his Catholic upbringing, Simenon was not a believer. Tigy came from a thoroughly non-religious family. However, Simenon's mother insisted on a church wedding, forcing Tigy to become a nominal convert, learning the Catholic Church's catechism. Despite their father's lack of religious convictions, all of Simenon's children would be baptized as Catholics. Marriage to Tigy, however, did not prevent Simenon from having liaisons with numerous other women, perhaps most famously, Josephine Baker.
  • 1922
    Simenon's father died in 1922 and this served as the occasion for the author to move to Paris with Régine Renchon (hereafter referred to by her nickname "Tigy"), at first living in the 17th arrondissement, not far from the Boulevard des Batignolles.
    More Details Hide Details He became familiar with the city, its bistros, cheap hotels, bars and restaurants. More importantly, he also came to know ordinary working-class Parisians. Writing under numerous pseudonyms, he found his creativity beginning to pay financial dividends.
  • 1921
    From 1921 to 1934 he used a total of 17 pen names while writing 358 novels and short stories.
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  • 1919
    Writing as "Monsieur Le Coq", he also published more than 800 humorous pieces between November 1919 and December 1922.
    More Details Hide Details He stopped writing for the Gazette in December 1922. During this period, Simenon's familiarity with nightlife, prostitutes, drunkenness and carousing increased. The people he rubbed elbows with included anarchists, bohemian artists and even two future murderers, the latter appearing in his novel Les Trois crimes de mes amis. He also frequented a group of artists known as "La Caque". While not really involved in the group, he did meet his future wife Régine Renchon through it.
    Simenon's first novel, Au Pont des Arches, was written in June 1919 and published in 1921 under his "G. Sim" pseudonym.
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    In January 1919, the 15-year-old Simenon took a job at the Gazette de Liège, a newspaper edited by Joseph Demarteau.
    More Details Hide Details While Simenon's own beat only covered unimportant human interest stories, it afforded him an opportunity to explore the seamier side of the city, including politics, bars, and cheap hotels but also crime, police investigations and lectures on police technique by the criminologist Edmond Locard. Simenon's experience at the Gazette also taught him the art of quick editing. He wrote more than 150 articles under the pen name "G. Sim." He began submitting stories to Le Matin in the early 1920s.
  • 1918
    Using his father's heart condition as a pretext, Simenon decided to put an end to his studies in June 1918, not even taking the Collège Saint-Louis' year-end exams.
    More Details Hide Details He subsequently worked a number of very short-term odd jobs.
  • 1917
    In February 1917, the Simenon family moved to a former post office building in the Amercoeur neighborhood.
    More Details Hide Details June 1919 saw another move, this time to the rue de l'Enseignement, back in the Outremeuse neighborhood.
  • 1914
    In September 1914, shortly after the beginning of the First World War, he began his studies at the Collège Saint-Louis, a Jesuit high school.
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  • 1908
    At the age of three, Simenon learned to read at the Saint-Julienne nursery school. Then, between 1908 and 1914, he attended the Institut Saint-André.
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  • 1906
    Georges Simenon's brother Christian was born in September 1906 and eventually became their mother's favorite child, much to Georges Simenon's chagrin.
    More Details Hide Details Later, in February 1911, the Simenons moved to 53 rue de la Loi, also in the Outremeuse. In this larger home, the Simenons were able to take in lodgers. Typical among them were apprentices and students of various nationalities, giving the young Simenon an important introduction to the wider world; this marked his novels, notably Pedigree and Le Locataire.
  • 1905
    In April 1905, two years after Georges Simenon's birth, the family moved to 3 rue Pasteur (now 25 rue Georges Simenon) in Liège's Outremeuse (FR) neighborhood.
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  • 1903
    Although Georges Simenon was born on 13 February 1903 superstition resulted in his birth being registered as having been on the 12th.
    More Details Hide Details This story of his birth is recounted at the beginning of his novel Pedigree. The Simenon family traces its origins back to the Limburg region, his mother's family being from Dutch Limburg. His mother had origins from both the Netherlands and Germany while his father was of Walloon origins. One of her more notorious ancestors was Gabriel Brühl, a criminal who preyed on Limburg from the 1720s until he was hanged in 1743. Later, Simenon would use Brühl as one of his many pen names.
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