Geraldine Brooks
American actress
Geraldine Brooks
Geraldine Brooks, born Geraldine Stroock, was an American actress whose three-decade career on stage as well as in films and on television was noted with nominations for an Emmy in 1962 and a Tony in 1970. She was married to author Budd Schulberg. She is not to be confused with the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Geraldine Brooks.
Biography
Geraldine Brooks's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Geraldine Brooks
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Geraldine Brooks
Show More Show Less
News
News abour Geraldine Brooks from around the web
Caleb's crossing - The Review - New Zealand Herald
Google News - over 5 years
At first, the storyline of this month's feature read, Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks, seems obvious. We know from the historical record that Caleb Cheeshahteaumauk, son of a sonquem or chief of the Native American Wôpanâak
Article Link:
Google News article
personal history in a colonial setting - The Australian
Google News - over 5 years
She is, apparently, driven by the same compulsion that gnaws at other commanding writers, such as Flanagan, Pulitzer prize-winner Geraldine Brooks and recent Miles Franklin winner Kim Scott (That Deadman Dance). For them, historical fiction is not just
Article Link:
Google News article
Bethel Library adds new books - Lewiston Sun Journal
Google News - over 5 years
... “Bless the Bride” by Rhys Bowen, “Sisterhood Everlasting” by Ann Brashares, “Caleb's Crossing” by Geraldine Brooks, “Live Wire” by Harlan Coben, “5th Witness” by Michael Connelly, “Carte Blanche” by Jeffery Deaver, “Fire World” by Chris D'Lacey,
Article Link:
Google News article
Obama keeps low profile on the Vineyard - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
The event, organized by Northampton attorney Tom Lesser with an assist from Art Buchwald's daughter-in-law Tamara, included talks by Pulitzer Prize winning novelist Geraldine Brooks, Harvard Law professor Alan Dershowitz, and former White House counsel
Article Link:
Google News article
Reader Q&A with Geraldine Brooks - New Zealand Herald
Google News - over 5 years
I imagine the switch to fiction writing could be either a liberating or a terrifying thing for a former foreign correspondent such as Geraldine Brooks, who spent several years reporting crises in the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans for the Wall
Article Link:
Google News article
Caleb's Crossing - The Power of Words - New Zealand Herald
Google News - over 5 years
That's just a sample of the old-fashioned words peppering the first few dozen pages of this month's feature novel, Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks. Some meanings were clear from the context, a few words had me reaching for my
Article Link:
Google News article
Book Club Members Divided On 'Caleb's Crossing' - The Ledger
Google News - over 5 years
So it was with "Caleb's Crossing," a novel by Geraldine Brooks that talks about life on Martha's Vineyard and the Cambridge, Mass., area during the 1600s, when Puritans held sway. Specifically, it is about a Native American named Caleb Cheeshahteaumauk
Article Link:
Google News article
Barbara Kingsolver to receive lifetime achievement award - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 5 years
Studs Terkel, Geraldine Brooks and Elie Wiesel are previous recipients of the lifetime achievement award, now named for Richard Holbrooke, the US diplomat who was essential in negotiating the Dayton Peace Accords and who passed away in December
Article Link:
Google News article
Best Sellers: Hardcover Fiction: Sunday, July 31st 2011
NYTimes - over 5 years
About the Best Sellers: These lists are an expanded version of those appearing in the July 31, 2011 print edition of the Book Review, reflecting sales for the week ending July 16, 2011. An asterisk (*) indicates that a book's sales are barely distinguishable from those of the book above it. A dagger (†) indicates that some retailers report
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Best Sellers: Hardcover Fiction: Sunday, July 24th 2011
NYTimes - over 5 years
About the Best Sellers: These lists are an expanded version of those appearing in the July 24, 2011 print edition of the Book Review, reflecting sales for the week ending July 9, 2011. An asterisk (*) indicates that a book's sales are barely distinguishable from those of the book above it. A dagger (†) indicates that some retailers report
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Best Sellers: Hardcover Fiction: Sunday, July 17th 2011
NYTimes - over 5 years
About the Best Sellers: These lists are an expanded version of those appearing in the July 17, 2011 print edition of the Book Review, reflecting sales for the week ending July 2, 2011. An asterisk (*) indicates that a book's sales are barely distinguishable from those of the book above it. A dagger (†) indicates that some retailers report
Article Link:
NYTimes article
IndieBound's bestselling books of the week - Alaska Dispatch
Google News - over 5 years
Caleb's Crossing, Geraldine Brooks, Viking 6. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, Stieg Larsson, Knopf 7. The Tiger's Wife, Tea Obreht, Random House 8. The Snowman, Jo Nesbø, Knopf 9. One Summer, David Baldacci, Grand Central 10. Now You See Her,
Article Link:
Google News article
Book Review: Caleb's Crossing - New Zealand Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Once again Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Geraldine Brooks takes a simple, barely known historical fact, fattens out and brings it to life so lyrically you feel transported back in time. Caleb is a Native American boy from the
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Geraldine Brooks
    FIFTIES
  • 1977
    Age 51
    A much more vulnerable persona than the poised, imperturbable one she played in Cry Wolf, she had a number of heavy dramatic confrontations with the overwrought character played by Joan Crawford (who received an Oscar nomination for the role) and became a lifelong friend of the eighteen-years-older star, and spoke at her memorial service in May 1977, five weeks before her own death.
    More Details Hide Details Seeing the young actress for the first time in the latter film, Bosley Crowther described her as "a newcomer who burns brightly... as Miss Crawford's sensitive step-daughter".
  • FORTIES
  • 1971
    Age 45
    She played the role of Arden Dellacorte in 1971 on the CBS daytime soap opera Love of Life and starred as the overweight owner of a delicatessen opposite James Coco in the short-lived 1976 situation comedy The Dumplings, her final role.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1962
    Age 36
    She was nominated for the 1962 Emmy Award for Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role for her appearance in the episode, "Call Back Yesterday", with fellow guest costar David Hedison in ABC's drama series, Bus Stop (based on the William Inge drama), starring Marilyn Maxwell as the operator of a bus station/diner in the fictitious town of Sunrise, Colorado.
    More Details Hide Details Geraldine Brooks died of a heart attack while battling cancer at Central Suffolk Hospital in Riverhead, New York. She was either 51 years old, or, per her New York Times obituary, 52. Her interment was in Mount Sinai, New York's cemetery, Washington Memorial Park.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1952
    Age 26
    She was again on Broadway in The Time of the Cuckoo in 1952, and in 1970 she was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play for Brightower, which closed after its opening night performance.
    More Details Hide Details Brooks appeared mostly on television after 1950. She appeared in many of the anthology series popular early in the decade, such as Orient Express, Armstrong Circle Theatre, Appointment with Adventure (two episodes), Lux Video Theatre, and Studio One. Brooks guest starred on Richard Diamond, Private Detective, and The Fugitive, both starring David Janssen. Her other credits included Johnny Staccato, Have Gun - Will Travel, Adventures in Paradise, Perry Mason, Ironside, The Defenders, Dr. Kildare, Stoney Burke, Mr. Novak, Ben Casey, Gunsmoke, The Outer Limits, Combat! (in the episode "The Walking Wounded"), Bonanza, It Takes A Thief, Daniel Boone and Kung Fu (in the episode "Nine Lives").
    Three years later, with the film finally receiving a shortened and censored U.S. release, A. H. Weiler, in his November 1952 New York Times review, noted that "Geraldine Brooks, an expatriate American who has emoted in more than one Italian film, gallantly tries to make a wistful and convincing heroine of Maria, the prostitute grasping desperately for a chance at decency".
    More Details Hide Details He described the film, however, as "a sad and limp romance, which is trite, slightly lachrymose and largely unedifying". The second title, Vulcano (later released in the U.S. as Volcano), had an Oscar-nominated (for 1937's The Life of Emile Zola) director, William Dieterle, and two top Italian stars, Anna Magnani and Rossano Brazzi, who were billed above her. The adventurous shoot was primarily confined to the land and sea area around the eponymous volcanic isle of Vulcano as well as Lipari, off the coast of Mediterranean's largest island, Sicily. Upon returning to Hollywood in October 1949, Dieterle told The New York Times that "Conditions for shooting a picture could hardly have been more primitive. Except for the mechanical equipment we took with us, we had to construct everything we needed with our own hands." The film restores Brooks to her familiar role of an innocent ingenue taken advantage of by an unscrupulous exploiter of women, played by Brazzi, while her older sister, played by Anna Magnani, returns to the island of their birth, burned out after having spent 18 years as a prostitute in Naples. As in the case of Streets of Sorrow, this production was also censored and released in the United States years after filming. In its June 1953 review, Time magazine noted that although it is "Reminiscent in story and treatment of Stromboli, Volcano is a far better film.
  • 1950
    Age 24
    Released two months earlier, in October, but not seen in New York until April 1950, the production gave her third billing, behind Edmund Gwenn and Donald Crisp who, in this version of the classic story, Greyfriars Bobby, were once again typecast as elderly Scotsmen.
    More Details Hide Details Playing the cemetery caretaker's daughter, she had the only female role of any importance, and was also given a couple of good dramatic scenes, but the focus was still firmly on the canine star. Her later film appearances were few but included roles in Johnny Tiger (1966) starring Robert Taylor, and Mr. Ricco (1975), opposite Dean Martin. In mid-1949, with no immediate movie or stage prospects, Geraldine Brooks accepted an offer from Italian production and distribution companies, Itala Film and Artisti Associati, for roles in two projects to be filmed on location, co-starring top native-born romantic leading men, Rossano Brazzi and Vittorio Gassman. Similar in tone, both are doom-laden melodramas depicting the tragic price women paid for descending into prostitution in the midst of the hunger, deprivation and moral corruption prevailing in postwar Italy. The first (released in the United States three years later as Streets of Sorrow) gave her, for the only time, top billing, as a prostitute making her living in the streets, who desperately and tragically attempts to prevent the handsome magistrate, played by Vittorio Gassman, who falls in love with her, from learning of her profession.
  • 1949
    Age 23
    The Columbia film was released in December 1949, a year after her previous screen appearance in An Act of Murder.
    More Details Hide Details Her final American film of the 1940s, Challenge to Lassie was made in Technicolor at MGM.
    After one more film, The Younger Brothers, a color Western not released until May 1949, in which she was, again, in fourth place, following Wayne Morris, Janis Paige and Bruce Bennett, Brooks asked for, and received, a release from her studio contract in July 1948, after two years and four films.
    More Details Hide Details Now a freelancer, she had a strong fourth-billed (following Fredric March, Edmond O'Brien and Florence Eldridge) dramatic role in Universal Pictures' An Act of Murder, playing the daughter of March and Eldridge, who were married in real life, and the anguish that the husband, a judge, endures when he contemplates ending the life of his terminally ill wife. It was released in December 1948, but the downbeat film, although receiving positive notices, was not a financial success. For The Reckless Moment (1949), directed by Max Ophuls, she was third-billed behind James Mason and Joan Bennett. Brooks, aged 24, was cast as Bennett's 17-year-old daughter, whose reckless affair with a seedy, older art dealer puts her mother on a collision course with a blackmailer with worse to come.
  • 1948
    Age 22
    In her third film, Warners allowed its new contract player to rise to the level of a co-star. Embraceable You, released in July 1948, had her second-billed to Dane Clark, who played a goodhearted, although criminally inclined, tough guy who falls in love with the victim of the hit-and-run car accident for which he was responsible.
    More Details Hide Details There was no happy ending for the two doomed protagonists, and the film, structured as a second feature, was little-noticed and went unreviewed in The New York Times.
  • 1947
    Age 21
    Her debut under the new stage name was also her first time in front of the cameras, as the studio's suspense drama, Cry Wolf, went into national release on August 19, 1947, although it was seen and reviewed in New York one month earlier.
    More Details Hide Details Billed third after top-tier stars Errol Flynn and Barbara Stanwyck she received mostly good notices, while the film itself encountered critical resistance, with The New York Times critic Bosley Crowther complaining that "The final explanation of the mystery is ridiculous and banal". Her second film at the studio, Possessed, was released three weeks before Cry Wolf, on July 26, and was, again, reviewed in New York earlier, on May 30. This time, she was in fourth place, behind top-tier stars Joan Crawford and Van Heflin and third-billed Raymond Massey.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1944
    Age 18
    Her first Broadway show, Follow the Girls, a musical comedy, opened at the New Century Theatre on April 8, 1944 and ran for 888 performances, closing over two years later, on May 18, 1946.
    More Details Hide Details The young actress, who was 18 when she was cast in this tuneful spoof of life in the theatre, played a character tellingly named "Catherine Pepburn". She did not stay with the production for its entire run, but was subsequently cast in another Broadway show, The Winter's Tale. This Theatre Guild production of the Shakespeare romance opened at the Cort Theatre on January 15, 1946 and closed after 39 performances on February 16. Playing the female lead, Perdita, the now-20-year-old actress was noticed by a Warner Bros. representative and signed to a contract. Unlike her two years elder sister, Gloria Stroock, who has a long career as an actress in mostly small film and television roles, keeping her real name, young Geraldine decided, at this point, to take the surname of "Brooks" professionally. That name was also the name of her father's costume company.
  • 1942
    Age 16
    The World War II years of 1942–45 found Geraldine Stroock refining her craft at such traditional venues as the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, the Neighborhood Playhouse and summer stock.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1925
    Born
    Born on October 29, 1925.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)