Hadley Richardson
American woman, wife to Ernest Hemingway
Hadley Richardson
Elizabeth Hadley Richardson married writer Ernest Hemingway in 1921. She was born the youngest daughter to a St. Louis family. After Hadley fell out of a window as a child, her mother became overprotective and curtailed her activities from then on. As a young adult, Hadley nursed her mother during an illness that led to her death; a few months later she met Ernest Hemingway. They were married after a courtship of less than a year.
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Hadley Richardson's personal information overview.
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Best on the shelf - Vancouver Sun
Google News - over 5 years
This literary biography is a fictional take on Ernest Hemingway's life with his first wife, Hadley Richardson. 1 Adam Mansbach & Ricardo Cortes A naughty bedtime book for parents, inspired by the author's daughter. Jaycee Dugard, who was kidnapped at
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What Marin is reading this summer - Marinscope Community Newspapers
Google News - over 5 years
This is a fictionalized account of the relationship between Hadley Richardson and Ernest Hemingway. After their brief courtship and small wedding, the young couple takes off for Jazz Age Paris, where Hadley makes a convincing transformation from an
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Shelf Life: In My Time, Fall of Giants, Griftopia, and Teenage Mutant Ninja ... - WilliametteLive.com
Google News - over 5 years
"We're Not Leaving" is a compilation of narratives told from the point of view of the disaster workers and first responders that were at the site that day and after. by Gioia Diliberto Ernest Hemingway and Hadley Richardson were the IT couple in Paris
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Best on the shelf - Vancouver Sun
Google News - over 5 years
9 Paula Mclain This literary biography is a fictional take on Ernest Hemingway's life with his first wife, Hadley Richardson. 10 Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child The latest Preston and Child thriller about FBI special agent Aloysius Pendergast
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BRAGG: Summer reading for fall - Murfreesboro Post
Google News - over 5 years
I also liked “The Paris Wife” by Paula McLain, a fictional account of Ernest Hemingway's first marriage to Hadley Richardson. It must have been a daunting undertaking by McLain to tackle this subject and she did it deftly. I enjoyed trying to determine
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Las luces de París - ElEspectador.com
Google News - over 5 years
En 1964 fue publicada en Estados Unidos su obra póstuma titulada París era una fiesta, en la cual recoge sus recuerdos vividos en París entre 1921 y 1926, con Hadley Richardson, su primera esposa, ciudad donde eran “muy pobres, pero muy felices”
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Summer Reads: The Paris Wife - FrumForum
Google News - over 5 years
In her book The Paris Wife, Paula McLain offers a detailed account of Hemingway's early years in both Chicago and Paris from the perspective of his first wife, Hadley Richardson. The reader encounters Stein in her atelier, Fitzgerald on the beaches of
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Northbrook Public Library's Most Wanted List: Aug. 7 - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
After a whirlwind courtship and marriage, Hadley Richardson moves to Paris with Ernest Hemingway where they become the golden couple in a lively and volatile group — the fabled "Lost Generation" — that includes Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound,
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Visiting consultant to talk parking amid new push for Rockport solution - Gloucester Daily Times
Google News - over 5 years
In it, she assumes the role of Hadley Richardson, first wife of Ernest Hemingway, and does a remarkable job depicting the mindset of a modern young woman living with a needy, if brilliant, young writer. On Wednesday, Aug. 17, Robin Wright will appear
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Hemingway's young love - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
“The Paris Wife: A Novel,'' by Paula McLain, is based on the true story of Ernest Hemingway and his marriage to Hadley Richardson, a “spinsterish'' young woman from St. Louis. Their marriage, which lasted from 1921 to 1926, was a tender and torturous
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Fulford: Hemingway's enduring legacy - National Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The Paris Wife, by Paula McLain (Ballantine), a recent novel, describes him as he may have appeared to his first wife, Hadley Richardson, the book's rather wanly imagined narrator, who knew him in the 1920s when he found his voice
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5 recent reads: The Paris Wife, What The Night Knows, Dark Matter, The ... - Wairarapa Times Age
Google News - over 5 years
by Paula McLain, Hachette, $39.99 Ernest Hemingway married Hadley Richardson on September 3, 1921. Hadley was the first of four wives. This is the story of the marriage; told with beauty, empathy and sadness. This wonderfully written novel brings to
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50 years later, Ernest Hemingway's work, life still hold us - Arizona Republic
Google News - over 5 years
McLain, whose "The Paris Wife" is based on Hemingway's first marriage to Hadley Richardson and their life during that romanticized period in Paris, realizes Allen's film is a comedy, but she says the real Hemingway is lost in the process
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Paris Without End: Hemingway's first wife has Chicago roots - WBEZ
Google News - over 5 years
The realtionship between Ernest Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley Richardson, is explored in Gioia Dilberto's new book. Gioia Diliberto's book Hadley, about Ernest Hemingway's first wife Hadley Richardson, was first published in 1992
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Summer of Hemingway: 'Papa' still casts a long shadow - Appleton Post Crescent
Google News - over 5 years
McLain, whose “The Paris Wife” is based on Hemingway's first marriage to Hadley Richardson and their life during that much-romanticized period in Paris, realizes Woody Allen's film is a comedy, but she says the real Hemingway is lost in the process
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Robust and reckless, Hemingway was understated only in style - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
He married Hadley Richardson and moved to Paris as a correspondent for the Toronto Star . The Paris Wif e, a best-selling novel published this year by Paula McLain, recounts Hemingway's marriage to Hadley. Though eight years his senior, ... -
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A marriage unraveled - Chicago Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
One afternoon in the late winter of 1961, while Hadley Richardson was vacationing at a ranch in Arizona with her second husband, she got a call from her first husband, Ernest Hemingway. Though the writer had spoken to Richardson
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Beach Reads - Shore News Today
Google News - over 5 years
Towards the end of his life, Ernest Hemingway wrote of first wife Hadley Richardson, “I wished I had died before I loved anyone but her.” “The Paris Wife” is a splendid fictional take on their passionate, turbulent union, set against the City of Lights
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Ernest Hemingway Had Connection To Hillsboro - thejournal-news.net
Google News - over 5 years
The book is about Hadley Richardson who is the first wife of Ernest Hemingway. The mention of Hillsboro comes on page 24 and says the following: "My mother's father was a teacher who started the Hillsboro Academy in Illinois..." The Academy was located
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Book of the Week - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
The Paris Wife by Paula McLain portrays Ernest Hemingway's first marriage, to Hadley Richardson. Hemingway's emotional liabilities were equal to his great talent, and as love and commitment are eroded by self absorption and success, the inevitable
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Hadley Richardson
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1979
    Age 87
    Hadley died on January 22, 1979, in Lakeland, Florida, at the age of 87.
    More Details Hide Details She is buried in New Hampshire at Chocorua Cemetery in Tamworth. In 1992, the definitive biography of Hadley Richardson, Hadley by Gioia Diliberto, was published. The book, which is based on extensive research, including the author's exclusive access to a series of taped conversations with Richardson, was reissued in 2011 as Paris Without End: The True Story of Hemingway's First Wife. In 2011, a book titled The Paris Wife: A Novel was published, telling the entire story of Hadley Richardson's relationship with Hemingway in "her voice." Although a work of fiction, its narrative is faithful to the known facts.
  • 1964
    Age 72
    Hemingway's memoir A Moveable Feast, not published until 1964, three years after Hemingway's death, captures the years Hadley and Hemingway lived in Paris during the early to mid-1920s.
    More Details Hide Details In the memoir, Hemingway writes about his marriage to Hadley and their life together in Paris. When Hadley left her marriage to Hemingway, she also left behind the limelight. She reportedly saw Hemingway only twice after their divorce. In July 1939, she and Mowrer ran into him while vacationing in Wyoming, and according to A.E. Hotchner, the last time Hemingway reported seeing Hadley was after a brief and spontaneous meeting in Paris.
  • 1957
    Age 65
    She continued to receive royalties from The Sun Also Rises, which included the royalties for the 1957 film.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1933
    Age 41
    On July 3, 1933, after a five-year courtship, Hadley and Paul Mowrer were married in London.
    More Details Hide Details Hadley was especially grateful for Mowrer's warm relationship with Bumby. Not long after the two married, they moved back to the US, to a suburb of Chicago, where they lived during World War II.
    In 1933 Hadley married a second time, to journalist Paul Mowrer, whom she met in Paris.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1927
    Age 35
    Among her many friends in Paris was Paul Mowrer, foreign correspondent for the Chicago Daily News, whom she had met in the spring of 1927, not long after her divorce was finalized.
    More Details Hide Details A journalist and political writer, in 1929 Mowrer won the Pulitzer Prize.
    The couple divorced in January 1927, and Hemingway married Pauline Pfeiffer in May the same year.
    More Details Hide Details Hadley stayed in France until 1934.
  • 1926
    Age 34
    In the spring of 1926, Hadley became aware of the affair, although she endured Pauline's presence in Pamplona that July.
    More Details Hide Details On their return to Paris, Hadley and Hemingway decided to separate, and Hadley formally requested a divorce in the fall. By November they had split their possessions, and Hadley accepted Hemingway's offer of the royalties from The Sun Also Rises.
  • 1925
    Age 33
    Sometime after their return to Paris from Canada, Hemingway met the Pfeiffer sisters. When in June 1925 Hemingway and Hadley left Paris for their annual visit to Pamplona—the third year they had done so—they were accompanied by a group of American and British expatriates, including Pauline Pfeiffer.
    More Details Hide Details The trip inspired Hemingway's first novel, The Sun Also Rises, which he began to write immediately after the fiesta, finishing it in September. In November, as a birthday present for Hadley, Hemingway bought Joan Miró's painting The Farm. Their marriage disintegrated as Hemingway was writing and revising The Sun Also Rises, although he dedicated the novel to "Hadley and John Hadley Nicanor." For the second year, they went to Schruns for Christmas, but that year they were joined by Pauline Pfeiffer. Hemingway returned with Pfeiffer to Paris, leaving Hadley with Bumby in Austria. While Hadley was in Austria, Hemingway sailed to New York then returned to Paris in March, at which time he may have begun his affair with Pauline.
    In 1925, Hadley learned of Hemingway's affair with Pauline Pfeiffer; she divorced him in 1927.
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  • 1923
    Age 31
    Their son John Hadley Nicanor Hemingway was born on October 10, 1923, in Toronto.
    More Details Hide Details He was named for his mother, Hadley, and for the young Spanish matador Nicanor Villalta, who had impressed Hemingway the previous summer. The baby was healthy, and the birth quick; Hemingway missed it, as he had been sent to New York on assignment, and was returning on a train when his wife went into labor. Hadley nicknamed the infant "Bumby." In Toronto, the family lived in a small apartment on Bathurst Street with "wall space enough to hang their collection of paintings." Hadley called the assignments given to her husband at the Toronto Star "absurd." Hemingway considered Toronto boring and wanted to return to Paris to the life of a writer, rather than live the life of a Toronto journalist. When Bumby was only a few months old, they returned to Paris, and in January 1924 moved into a new apartment on Rue Notre Dame des Champs. Hadley hired a woman to help with housework and with Bumby, and borrowed a pram to take the baby on walks in the Luxembourg Gardens. Bumby's christening was held at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in March with "Chink" Dorman-Smith and Gertrude Stein as godparents. A few months later, mismanagement of her funds left Hadley with a financial loss, and at the same time Hemingway started work as an editor for Ezra Pound and Ford Madox Ford's small modernist magazine, the Transatlantic Review. In June, Hadley and Hemingway went again to Pamplona, leaving Bumby in Paris, and that winter they went for the first time to Austria to vacation in Schruns.
  • 1922
    Age 30
    Hadley went alone to Geneva in December 1922 to meet Hemingway who was covering a Peace Conference.
    More Details Hide Details It was during this trip, while waiting for a train at the Gare de Lyon, that Hadley misplaced and lost a suitcase filled with Hemingway's manuscripts. Devastated and angry at the loss of his work, he blamed her. A few months later, when they learned Hadley was pregnant, the couple decided to move to Toronto for the child's birth. Before they left, the couple went for the first time to watch the bullfighting and the running of the bulls at the Festival of San Fermín in Pamplona.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1921
    Age 29
    They were married on September 3, 1921, in Horton Bay, Michigan, and spent their honeymoon at the Hemingway family summer cottage on Walloon Lake.
    More Details Hide Details The weather was miserable, and both Hadley and Hemingway came down with fever, sore throat, and cough. The couple returned to Chicago after their honeymoon, where they lived in a small apartment on North Dearborn Street. The death of an uncle gave Hadley another inheritance and additional financial independence for the couple. Initially they intended to visit Rome, but Sherwood Anderson convinced them to visit Paris instead. Anderson's advice to live in Paris interested her and, when two months later Hemingway was hired as foreign correspondent for the Toronto Star, the couple left for Paris. Of Hemingway's marriage to Hadley, Hemingway biographer Jeffrey Meyers claims: "With Hadley, Hemingway achieved everything he had hoped for with Agnes: the love of a beautiful woman, a comfortable income, a life in Europe." In Paris, Hadley and Hemingway lived in a small apartment at 74 Rue du Cardinal Lemoine in the Latin Quarter, and he worked in a rented room in a nearby building. That winter he discovered the Shakespeare and Company bookshop, which also functioned as a lending library, and was run by American expatriate Sylvia Beach. Hadley went there to buy James Joyce's works, which she liked, because Beach had published Joyce's Ulysses. The Hemingways first met Joyce at the book shop in March 1922.
    During the winter of 1921, Hadley took up her music again and indulged in outdoor activities.
    More Details Hide Details She and Hemingway corresponded during the winter. When she expressed misgivings about their age difference, he "protested that it made no difference at all." Hemingway visited her in St. Louis in March, and two weeks later she visited him in Chicago. Then, they did not see each other for two months, until he returned to St. Louis in May. In their correspondence she promised to buy him a Corona typewriter for his birthday. In June she announced her engagement, despite objections to the marriage from his friends and her sister. Hadley believed she knew what she was doing and, more importantly, she had an inheritance with which to support herself and a husband. She believed in Hemingway's talent and believed "she was right for him."
    The two married in 1921 after a courtship of less than a year, and moved to Paris within months of being married.
    More Details Hide Details In Paris, Hemingway pursued a writing career, and through him Hadley met other expatriate British and American writers.
  • 1920
    Age 28
    Shortly after her mother's death, in December 1920, Hadley visited her old roommate Katie Smith (who would later marry John Dos Passos) in Chicago, and through her met Hemingway, who was living with Smith's brother and was employed as an associate editor of the monthly journal Cooperative Commonwealth.
    More Details Hide Details When Hadley returned to St. Louis, Hemingway, who became infatuated with her, wrote "I knew she was the girl I was going to marry." Hadley, eight years older than Hemingway, was red-haired, with a "nurturing instinct." Bernice Kert, author of The Hemingway Women, claims Hadley was "evocative" of the woman whom Hemingway met and fell in love with during his recuperation from injuries during World War I, Agnes von Kurowsky, but in Hadley, Hemingway saw a childishness Agnes lacked.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1903
    Age 11
    Hadley's father was less protective, but in 1903 he committed suicide in response to financial difficulties.
    More Details Hide Details As a teenager Hadley became painfully shy and reclusive. She attended Mary Institute in St. Louis, and then attended college at Bryn Mawr. However, when her mother decided Hadley was "too delicate, both physically and emotionally," she left college. The death of her sister Dorothea (who sustained burns from a house fire) earlier that year may have also contributed to Hadley's decision to leave college. Hemingway scholar Jamie Barlowe believes Hadley represented a "True Woman" as opposed to a "New Woman" of the early 20th century. The "True Woman" was "emotional, dependent, gentle—a true follower." After her return from college, Hadley lived a restricted life—her sister and her mother continued to worry about her health—with little opportunity for physical activity or much of a social life. Her mother did allow Hadley to visit her former Bryn Mawr roommate Katy Smith in Vermont one summer. While visiting her friend, she enjoyed playing tennis, and she met Maxfield Parrish, but when her mother became worried over her well-being, she was forced to return home. While her mother became reclusive and immersed herself in spiritualism, Hadley spent some years attempting to attain a career as a pianist, until she abandoned music, believing she lacked talent. When her mother developed Bright's Disease, Hadley nursed her until her death.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1891
    Born
    Elizabeth Hadley Richardson was born on November 9, 1891, in St. Louis, Missouri, the youngest of four children.
    More Details Hide Details Hadley's mother, Florence (née Wyman), was an accomplished musician and singer, and her father, James Richardson, Jr., worked for a family pharmaceutical company. While a child, Hadley fell out of a second-story window and consequently was bed-ridden for a year. After the accident, her mother became overly protective, not allowing Hadley to learn how to swim or engage in other physical activities.
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