Hamad Thani
Emir of Qatar
Hamad Thani
Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani is the ruling Emir of the State of Qatar since 1995. Sheikh Hamad was the appointed Heir Apparent of Qatar between 1977 and 1995 and at the same time Minister of Defense. In the early 1980s he led the Supreme Planning Council, which sets the Qatar's basic economic and social policies. Starting in 1992, Hamad had a growing responsibility for the day-to-day running of the country, including the development of Qatar's oil and natural gas resources.
Biography
Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani's personal information overview.
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Qatar in 3 days of mourning for ex-emir
Yahoo News - 4 months
Qatar began three days of mourning on Monday after the death of former emir Khalifa bin Hamad Al-Thani, who oversaw the start of the country's transformation into an energy powerhouse. Prayers took place at the national mosque after which the former ruler -- who was deposed in a bloodless coup by his son Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani in 1995 -- was buried in Al Rayyan on the western fringes of Doha. Many Qataris took to social media to express their condolences and the US ambassador in Qatar, Dana Shell Smith, gave a statement to local media saying she was "saddened to learn of the passing".
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Yahoo News article
Qatar former emir 'successfully recovering' after breaking leg
Yahoo News - about 1 year
Qatar's former emir has returned to Doha and is "successfully recovering" following an emergency operation in Switzerland after breaking a leg while on holiday, the government said Tuesday. Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, known as the "Father Emir", broke his leg while holidaying at a Moroccan resort in the Atlas mountains in late December. "Father Emir is well and is successfully recovering from his leg injury," it said.
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Yahoo News article
14 Giant Sculptures Of Fetuses Attract Praise From Pro-Life Supporters
Huffington Post - over 3 years
When Damien Hirst erected 14 massive sculptures depicting the stages of human fetal development in Doha, Qatar, we can't say that we were surprised. The controversial British bad boy has a knack for staging over-the-top art spectacles (see here, here and here), so his arrangement of 216 tons worth of bronze babies was hardly his most explosive exhibition. What is surprising, however, is that the artwork, titled "The Miraculous Journey," has garnered praise from an unlikely group of conservative admirers. According to Independent Catholic News, Pro-Life supporters are smitten with Hirst's homage to the gestation process, calling it, among other things, "art in service of truth." "Whether the artist intended it or not, and I believe he did, the sculptures take a pro-life view," Canadian Catholic Lou Iacobelli wrote on his blog. "Consider the last piece which is a huge sculpture of the born baby. Visually it says that we cannot hide this human life away and destroy it." "We congrat ...
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Huffington Post article
Qatari poet sentenced to 15 years in prison for insulting emir
Yahoo News - over 3 years
DOHA (Reuters) - A Qatari court on Monday upheld a 15-year jail sentence handed down to a poet convicted of criticizing the former emir and attempting to incite revolt, a relative said. In his verses, Muhammad Ibn al-Dheeb al-Ajami praised the Arab Spring revolts that toppled four authoritarian leaders. He also criticized Qatar's former absolute monarch, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, and mocked "sheikhs playing on their PlayStations". The appeal process has now been exhausted and his only chance of release is for the Gulf's state's new Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, to pardon him. ...
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Yahoo News article
Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani and his wife Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser al-Misnad hold a copy of the World Cup trophy he received from FIFA President Sepp Blatter (unseen) after the announcement that Qatar will be the host nation for the FIFA
Yahoo News - over 3 years
Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani and his wife Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser al-Misnad hold a copy of the World Cup trophy he received from FIFA President Sepp Blatter (unseen) after the announcement that Qatar will be the host nation for the FIFA World Cup 2022, in Zurich in this December 2, 2010 file photo. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/Files
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Yahoo News article
Harsh Qatari Labor Conditions Move Center Stage as FIFA Debates World Cup
Huffington Post Sports - over 3 years
Controversy over conditions for unskilled and semi-skilled workers in Qatar involved in the construction of World Cup-related infrastructure as well as for flight attendants of Qatar Airways, the 2022 tournament's likely official carrier, has moved center stage as world soccer body FIFA prepares to debate next week the Gulf state's hosting of the 2022 soccer tournament. FIFA's focus is on whether to move the tournament from summer to winter because of Qatar's harsh summer temperatures that can exceed 40 degrees Celsius. FIFA however will find it difficult to maintain a narrow concern for the welfare of players with no regard to the army of workers involved in constructing billions of dollars in World Cup-related infrastructure. Beyond reputational damage, the debate over workers' rights and conditions increases the risk of FIFA being pushed to entertain depriving Qatar of its hosting rights, a move that would be perceived by much of the Muslim world as anti-Arab and anti-Muslim. Int ...
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Huffington Post Sports article
Qatar: No more own goals
The Economist - over 3 years
Tamim keeps the ball low BARELY two months since Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani passed the crown to his son, Tamim, a new mood is taking hold in Doha, Qatar’s capital. Continuity is the official name of the game, but such catchphrases as “rebalancing”, “discipline” and even “the need to centralise” have crept into the political lexicon, heralding a shift in emphasis both at home and abroad.The achievement of the departing emir, who is still only 61, was astonishing. When he ousted his father in 1992, Qatar was a sleepy Gulf statelet, with only 50,000 citizens. He turned it into a hub of diplomacy and even revolution, while giving its nationals the highest average GDP per person in the world (more than $80,000 at last count). Sheikh Hamad can plausibly claim to have been the most dynamic and charismatic Arab leader so far this century.Yet in the past few months a less complimentary buzzword—“overreach”—has also been bandied about. It is no exaggeration that all the other monarchs ...
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The Economist article
Decision to Change Date of Qatari World Cup Risks Political and Legal Rows
Huffington Post - over 3 years
A pending decision in early October by world soccer body FIFA on whether to move the Qatar 2022 World Cup from summer to winter threatens to open debate on whether to deprive the Gulf state of its right to host one of the world's two largest sporting events and could spark allegations of an anti-Arab bias. The debate about the Qatari World Cup also focuses the spotlight on the incestuous relationship between politics and sports, a relationship that FIFA president Sepp Blatter in a rare acknowledgement, confirmed by charging that politics had prompted the eight European members of his 24-member executive committee to deliver eight of the 14 votes cast in favor of Qatar. The acknowledgement highlights the need to end denial of a fact of life and move to some form of governance of the relationship between sports and politics. The debates have intensified as the FIFA executive committee prepares to discuss on October 3 and 4 a shifting the Qatari World Cup to winter because of searing ...
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Huffington Post article
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Yahoo News - over 3 years
Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser al-Misnad, wife of Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani (L), holds a copy of the World Cup he received from FIFA President Sepp Blatter (R) after the announcement that Qatar is going to be host nation for the FIFA World Cup 2022, in Zurich in this December 2, 2010 file photo. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/Files
Article Link:
Yahoo News article
Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani and his wife Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser al-Misnad hold a copy of the World Cup trophy he received from FIFA President Sepp Blatter (unseen) after the announcement that Qatar will be the host nation for the FIFA
Yahoo News - over 3 years
Qatar's Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al Thani and his wife Sheikha Moza Bint Nasser al-Misnad hold a copy of the World Cup trophy he received from FIFA President Sepp Blatter (unseen) after the announcement that Qatar will be the host nation for the FIFA World Cup 2022, in Zurich in this December 2, 2010 file photo. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/Files
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Yahoo News article
Sami Moubayed: A Wake Up Call for the Syrian Brotherhood
Huffington Post - over 3 years
When Ahmad Mouaz al-Khatib was elected president of the Syrian National Alliance in late 2012, red flags were raised at the offices of the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood. The Brothers feared ideological competition from someone who like them, was preaching Sunni Islam. Their niche, after all, was the conservative Sunni Muslim street of Syria, which they supposedly represented and sought to monopolize. Here was Khatib, a scholar and former preacher at the prestigious Umayyad Mosque, seemingly being parachuted into the job, right from the heart of Damascus. Although politically inexperienced, he came across as selfless, unblemished, and sincere. He came from the midst of domestic suffering within Syria, whereas the Brotherhood operated from exile. Most of its active cadres were second-generation members born and raised outside of Syria. Simply by being himself, Khatib threatened to make them irrelevant, exposing the Brothers as power-hungry politicians blinded by their thundering ...
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Huffington Post article
Amir Madani: The Many Plagues of Egypt
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Amidst the different bitter disputes raging within the cultural, political and geopolitical matrix, the Egyptians had another putsch. A set of heterogeneous forces composed of democrats, liberals, Nasserites, leftists, youth, women and minorities, all frightened by the grip on power of the Muslim Brotherhood ("MB") and with the support of the Army, ousted the first ever elected Egyptian president, Mohamed Morsi. If Morsi and the MB have failed to build a new, inclusive democratic state in Egypt by their restrictive policies, the Egyptian democrats failed to achieve power via the ballot box. There is no such thing as a "coup-volution" but only a "coup d'état," even though with the support of people. Democracy can be born and rise only via the ballot box. So if the Egyptian democrats are not able to rapidly force the Army to call new elections to pass full power to a civil government, the Army will remain the undemocratic supreme arbiter of political scenarios, just as in times ...
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Huffington Post article
Qatar' losing Mideast ground to Saudi diplomacy'
Fox News - over 3 years
Qatar, a key supporter of Islamists who rose to power in Arab Spring countries, is losing ground in regional politics to Saudi Arabia which appears to have seized the reins on key issues, notably Egypt and Syria. The decline in Qatar's regional diplomacy comes as its powerful emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani unexpectedly abdicated in favour of his son Tamim last month. The wealthy Gulf state had transformed itself into a key regional player but began to retreat as heavyweight Saudi Arabia re-entered the political arena after lagging behind in the immediate period following the eruption of the Arab Spring uprisings in December 2010. The overthrow of Egypt's Islamist president Mohamed Morsi last week by the army and the election by the Syrian opposition of Saudi-linked Ahmad Assi Jarba as new leader stripped Qatar of strong influence in both countries. "Qatar had tried to take a leading role in the region but overstepped its limits by openly backing the Muslim Brotherhood in Eg ...
Article Link:
Fox News article
Perspective: Continuity amid change in Qatar
Chicago Times - over 3 years
After nearly two decades in power, Qatar's ruler, Emir Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, is transferring power to his son and heir apparent, Sheik Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani.     
Article Link:
Chicago Times article
Insight: Smooth Qatar handover rooted in turbulent past of "Father Emir"
Yahoo News - over 3 years
By William Maclean DUBAI (Reuters) - Qatar's outgoing emir wanted to abdicate while he was still able to help his 33-year-old heir consolidate his authority, so ensuring minimal discord inside a family with a long record of palace intrigue. While no one other than outgoing emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani can know his full motivations, foremost among them appears to have been a need for stability in a dynasty that has ruled for more than 130 years. ...
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Yahoo News article
Taufiq Rahim: Another Coup for the Outgoing Emir of Qatar
Huffington Post - over 3 years
In July 2010, the (now outgoing) Emir of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, traveled to South Lebanon to bask in the gratitude for his country's largesse in supporting reconstruction following the Israeli bombardment just four years earlier. The $300 million (and beyond) committed by the Gulf state was very much appreciated by the Shiite armed movement Hezbollah, who ensured billboards in the South and on Airport Road in Beirut were decorated with notes of thanks to the Emir. It was a conspicuous visit because Qatar had stood out amongst the GCC in taking a strong if not controversial stand. Hand-in-hand with Hezbollah, the Emir, was not apparently one of the "half-men" that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad pointed to in the Gulf during the 2006 Hezbollah-Israel war. In fact, the Emir and Assad were quite close, if not close friends, and were frequently in touch. In 2013, Qatar finds itself at the forefront on a number of regional issues, most notably the conflict ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Out with the old in Qatar but little change expected
Fox News - over 3 years
The succession of power in Qatar is not expected to disrupt the tiny Gulf state's rising international political influence or its role as an economic powerhouse with a global reach, analysts say. The unprecedented decision by the 61-year-old emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, to abdicate in favour of his 33-year-old son Sheikh Tamim is expected to be followed by a government reshuffle that will also see the old guard take a bow, the experts add. Sheikh Hamad announced his decision in a televised speech on Tuesday, saying it marks the "beginning of a new era in which a young leadership will hold the banner." Hamad is stepping down after 18 years as the ruler of Qatar, a backwater which thanks to its immense gas wealth he drove into modernisation and a political and economic player to be reckoned with. He is leaving his son a "stable country that has good ties with its Gulf neighbours, namely (oil powerhouse) Saudi Arabia," said analyst Abdelwahab Badrakhan. "I don't expect an ...
Article Link:
Fox News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2016
    Age 64
    In April 2016, Hamad was named in the Panama Papers.
    More Details Hide Details Sheikh Hamad has three wives and twenty-four children, eleven sons and thirteen daughters: Sheikh Hamad received numerous honours and awards, both during and before his time as Emir:
  • 2012
    Age 60
    In 2012 it was rumoured that Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani was in bid for Rangers F.C..
    More Details Hide Details On 30 March 2012 Sheik Al Thani offered to buy KF Tirana, although the details have yet to be published.
    In December 2012, The New York Times accused the Qatari government of funding the Al-Nusra Front, a U.S. government designated terrorist organization.
    More Details Hide Details Others have noted the Emir's visit to Gaza and meeting with Hamas, which houses a militant wing, Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades. In January 2013, French politicians again accused the Emir's government of giving material support to Islamist groups in Mali and the French newspaper Le Canard enchaîné quoted an unnamed source in French military intelligence saying that "The MNLA, al Qaeda-linked Ansar Dine and MUJAO have all received cash from Doha."
  • FIFTIES
  • 2011
    Age 59
    Media sources claimed that Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani made a bid for Manchester United on 11 February 2011.
    More Details Hide Details Qatari Holdings offered £1.65 billion to Malcolm Glazer, the American owner of the club. This follows a series of endeavors by the Emir and other Qataris into the World Football community, following Qatar's successful bid for the 2022 World Cup, and the Qatar Foundation's recent £125m shirt deal with FC Barcelona. In mid-June 2011, rumours resurfaced that Qatari Holdings were preparing a £2 Billion takeover bid and that the funding, that the club had been using for transfers since the start of June, was actually supplied by the Qataris and not the Glazer Family.
  • 2006
    Age 54
    He was a key person in the cease fire during the 2006 Lebanon War and contributed majorly in the relief of damaged areas. In 2012, the Emir proposed deploying Arab troops to reduce killings in the Syrian civil war.
    More Details Hide Details He provided two military bases for foreign troops, Al Udeid Air Base and Camp As Sayliyah. Despite the prevalence of anti-Israel sentiment within the Arab world, he had previously maintained friendly relations with Israel. He met Foreign Minister of Israel Tzipi Livni (25 September 2007) in New York City. This marked the first real attempt by any leader in the Persian Gulf to pursue dialogue with Israel. However, Qatar severed diplomatic ties with Israel in 2009 in response to Israel's actions during the Gaza War. The emir has also expressed his objection to Israeli settlement policy, especially the Judaization of Jerusalem. In October 2012, the Emir made a landmark visit to Gaza by being the first head of state to go there since the 2006 election of Hamas and the imposition of a blockade by Israel. He took a flight to Egypt before being driven into Gaza. While there, the emir was thought to be launching a $254 million reconstruction project in the territory, and giving an address to the Palestinian people. Palestine's interior ministry was said to have a "well-prepared plan" to provide security for the emir during his stay. Incidents nevertheless continued.
  • 2005
    Age 53
    In 2005, under the direction of Hamad and the former Prime minister of Qatar Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani, the Qatar Investment Authority was established, a sovereign wealth fund to manage the country's oil and natural gas surpluses.
    More Details Hide Details The Qatar Investment Authority and its subsidiaries have acquired many businesses abroad, including London's iconic department store Harrods from entrepreneur Mohammed Al-Fayed, Paris-based department store Printemps, French football club Paris Saint-Germain F.C., a former 10% stake in Porsche, a 75% stake in film studio Miramax which they acquired from Disney, a 2% stake in media conglomerate and Universal Music Group parent company Vivendi, a $100 million USD investment in Chernin Group – whose founder Peter Chernin was COO of News Corp and President of Fox, a 1% stake in luxury goods manufacturer Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy, a 6% stake in Credit Suisse, a 12.6% stake in Barclays and several other major companies. They also backed Glencore's$31 billion USD takeover bid for Xstrata. Qatar is the largest property owner in London with their holdings including Europe's tallest building The Shard, Olympic Village and Park Lane's InterContinental Hotel. They also own several hotels in Cannes including the Majestic Hotel, Grand Hyatt Cannes Hôtel Martinez and Carlton Hotel. QIA was considered to have one of the leading bids in the sales of both Anschutz Entertainment Group and Hulu. As of May 2013, it was reported the Investment Authority was in talks to purchase Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman.
    In the arts, Hamad established the Qatar Museums Authority in 2005 which built the I. M. Pei designed Museum of Islamic Art Doha.
    More Details Hide Details Since opening, Qatar has become the world's biggest contemporary art buyer, famously purchasing Cézanne's The Card Players in 2012 for over US$250 million. The arts acquisitions' efforts were often represented by Sheikh Saud bin Mohammed Al Thani, Hamad's first cousin and president of Qatar’s National Council for Culture, Arts and the Heritage. The Museum Authority sponsored Takashi Murakami's EGO exhibit in Doha which ran from 9 February to 24 June 2012, Damien Hirst's retrospective at Tate Modern in Spring and Summer 2012 and his exhibition Relic, slated to open in Doha in October 2013. In July 2013, in conjunction with Miuccia Prada and the Prada Foundation, QMA launched CURATE, a global search for curatorial talent. Additionally, the Doha Film Institute was established in 2009 which in partnership with the Tribeca Film Festival (founded by Robert De Niro), created the Doha Tribeca Film Festival that ran from 2009 – 2012. The Doha Film Institute is producing Salma Hayek's upcoming animated adaptation of Khalil Gibran's classic novel The Prophet, with "Lion King" director Roger Allers co-ordinating the process. DFI is also credited as a production company on several other films, including Just Like a Woman starring Sienna Miller, The Reluctant Fundamentalist directed by Mira Nair which opened 69th Venice International Film Festival, and Kanye West's Cruel Summer – a short film which shot in Doha and premiered during the 2012 Cannes Film Festival.
    The Washington Post reported in 2005 that Sheik Hamad was under pressure to privatize the network. In 2010, the country won its controversial bid to hosting the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Doha.
    More Details Hide Details On 25 June 2013 Hamad handed over power to his son Tamim in a televised speech. In regards to the shift in power, Hamad said: "The time has come to open a new page in the journey of our nation that would have a new generation carry the responsibilities." Hamad is believed to have suffered from poor health for several years. In December 2015 he was flown to Zürich, Switzerland for treatment after breaking his leg while on holiday in Morocco's Atlas mountains.
  • FORTIES
  • 2001
    Age 49
    At an 3 October 2001 press conference, Colin Powell tried to persuade Sheik Hamad to shut down Al Jazeera while the New York-based organization Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting commented that in those efforts, "Powell and other U.S. officials were reportedly upset by the channel re-airing old interviews with bin Laden and the inclusion of guests that are too critical of the United States on its programs."
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1995
    Age 43
    The deposition came after a falling out between Hamad bin Khalifa and his father, who had tried regaining some of the authority he bestowed upon Hamad in early 1995.
    More Details Hide Details Hamad then engaged an American law firm to freeze his father's bank accounts abroad, thereby defeating a possible countercoup. Thereafter, his father lived in exile in France and Abu Dhabi until he returned to Qatar in 2004. In a break with the traditional role, his second wife Sheikha Mozah bint Nasser Al Missned has been a visible advocate for education and children's causes. A sportsman and an accomplished diver, Hamad has played an active role in promoting and developing athletics in Qatar. His activism has enhanced the country's involvement and performance in a number of international competitions, including: winning an Olympic medal in track and field; hosting a wide variety of international sporting events such as the 15th Asian Games, GCC, Asian and World Youth soccer championships; and initiating the Qatar Open Tennis Championship which has grown to become one of two premier tennis competitions in the Middle East.
    With the support of his family, Hamad took control of the country in 1995 while his father was on vacation abroad.
    More Details Hide Details While his father Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani was in Geneva, Switzerland, Hamad bin Khalifa deposed him in a bloodless coup d'état.
  • 1992
    Age 40
    Starting in 1992, Hamad's father handed over responsibility for the day-to-day running of the country, including the development of Qatar's oil and natural gas resources, rendering him the effective ruler.
    More Details Hide Details However, his father ultimately retained control over state finances.
    From 1992 Hamad had a growing responsibility for the day-to-day running of the country, including the development of Qatar's oil and natural gas resources.
    More Details Hide Details On 27 June 1995, after deposing his father in a palace coup, Hamad became Emir of Qatar and was crowned on 20 June 2000. In the early 1980s, Hamad led the Supreme Planning Council, which sets Qatar's basic economic and social policies.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1977
    Age 25
    Hamad was appointed Heir Apparent of Qatar in 1977 and held the post until 1995.
    More Details Hide Details In the early 1980s, he led the Supreme Planning Council, which sets Qatar's basic economic and social policies.
    In 1977 he was named minister of defense.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1972
    Age 20
    In 1972 Hamad had the rank of general, and became army chief of staff.
    More Details Hide Details Next he was appointed commander-in-chief of Qatar's armed forces with the rank of major general.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1971
    Age 19
    He graduated from the British Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst in 1971 and commissioned as a lieutenant colonel.
    More Details Hide Details After graduation he was made commander of a mobile brigade, which later became a force called "Hamad Brigade".
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1952
    Age 0
    Hamad was born 1952.
    More Details Hide Details His mother died soon after the birth and he was raised by his uncle.
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