Hamida Banu Begum
Mughal Empress
Hamida Banu Begum
Hamida Banu Begam, 'Maryam Makani' was a wife of the second Mughal Emperor, Humayun, and the mother of Mughal Emperor, Akbar. Her important architectural legacy is the Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, which she commissioned in 1562 CE, and saw through its construction over the next eight years.
Biography
Hamida Banu Begum's personal information overview.
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News
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Facts about Humayun - DAWN.com
Google News - over 5 years
She said that when the forlorn king arrived in the Persian Court, he had with him merely 44 people, including two women: Hamida Begum and her lady-in-waiting. Shah Tahmasp (1514-1574) of Persia initially provided full protocol to the uninvited guest
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Protecting child rights obligatory for competent future leadership - Financial Express Bangladesh
Google News - over 5 years
District Children Affairs Officer Mosharraf Hossain Prodhan, former district organiser Sukhen Mukherjee, Deputy Director of Imam Training Academy Syed Amin Uddin Mahmud, Deputy Director of Department of Social Service Hamida Begum and Executive
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2 killed, 75 hurt as storm hits several districts - The Daily Star
Google News - almost 6 years
Of the injured, Hamida Begum, wife of Lokman Bapari of Sadar upazila, was admitted to Madaripur Sadar Hospital in a critical condition while the rest were given first aid at the hospital. In Noakhali, 25 shops were damaged and at least 15 people
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INDIA DISASTER: CHRONICLE OF A NIGHTMARE
NYTimes - about 32 years
It began without warning in the dead of night, while the vast and crowded slums of Bhopal, India, lay in slumber, dreaming the troubled dreams of want and hope, heedless of the danger in the wind scything over the silent metropolis. The wind was brisk that night. As it rolled in from the northwest, out of India's central plains and across Bhopal, a
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IN HOSPITALS OF BHOPAL, THE SUFFERING GOES ON
NYTimes - about 32 years
In the emergency room of the Government Medical College Hospital here, doctors and nurses struggled late tonight to save seven children. The children, between 1 and 6 years old, thrashed in agony on their beds, choking, vomiting and screaming to suck in air. Their parents and relatives stood nearby, watching helplessly as doctors placed intravenous
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Hamida Banu Begum
    OTHER
  • 1604
    She was buried at Humayun's Tomb after her death on 29 August 1604 (19th Shahriyar, 1013 AH) in Agra, just a year before the death of her son Akbar and almost half a century after death of her husband, Humayun.
    More Details Hide Details Throughout her years, she was held in high regard by her son Akbar, as English traveler Thomas Coryat recorded, Akbar carrying her palanquin himself across the river, during one of her journeys from Lahore to Agra. Later when Prince Salim, future emperor Jahangir, revolted against his father Akbar, she took upon the case of her grandson, and a reconciliation ensued thereafter, even though Salim had plotted and got Akbar's favorite minister Abu'l-Fazl killed. Akbar shaved his head and chin only on two occasions, one at the death of foster-mother Jiji Anga and another at the death of his mother. She was given the title, Maryam-makānī, dwelling with Mary, posthumously, as she was considered, 'epitome of innocence' by Akbar. Details of her life are also found in Humayun Nama, written by Gulbadan Begum, sister of Humayun, as well as in Akbarnama and Ain-i-Akbari, both written during the reign of his son, Akbar.
  • 1557
    Hamida Banu joined Akbar from Kabul, only during his second year of reign, 1557 CE, and stayed with him thereafter, she even intervened into politics on various occasions, most notable during the ouster of Mughal minister, Bairam Khan, when Akbar came of age in 1560.
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  • 1554
    In November 1554, when Humayun set out for India, she stayed back in Kabul. Though he took control of Delhi in 1555, he died within a year of his return, by falling down the steps of his library at Purana Qila, Delhi, in 1556 at the age of 47, leaving behind a thirteen-year-old heir, Akbar, who was to become one of greatest emperors of the empire.
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  • 1548
    In 1548, she and Akbar accompanied Humayun to Kabul.
    More Details Hide Details During the reign of Akbar, there are many instances where, imperial ladies interfered in matters of the court to ask pardon for a wrong doer. Though once Hamida Banu did so, her pleas went to deaf ears as Akbar refused to forgive a Sunni Muslim from Lahore who killed a Shia Muslim. Meanwhile, Sher Shah Suri died in May 1545, and after that his son and successor, Islam Shah died too in 1554, disintegrating the Suri dynasty rule.
  • 1545
    Thus, it was not until 15 November 1545 (Ramdan 10th, 952 AH) that she saw her son Akbar again, the scene of young Akbar recognizing his mother amongst a group of women has been keenly illustrated in Akbar's biography, Akbarnama.
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  • 1544
    In 1544, at a camp at Sabzawar, 93 miles south of Herat, she gave birth to a daughter, thereafter she returned from Persia with the army given to Humayun by Shah of Iran, Tahmasp I, and at Kandahar met Dildar Begum, and her son, Mirza Hindal.
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  • 1543
    Then in 1543, she made the perilous journey from Sindh, which had Qandahar for its goal, but in course of which Humayun had to take hasty flight from Shal-mastan, ‘through a desert and waterless waste.’ Leaving her little son behind, she accompanied her husband to Persia, here they visited the shrines of her ancestor, Ahmad-e Jami and Shiites shrine, of Ardabil in Iran, the place of origin of Safavid dynasty which helped them immensely in the following years.
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  • 1542
    Two months later she gave birth future Emperor, Akbar on the early morning of 15 October 1542 (fourth day of Rajab, 949 AH), he was given the name Humayun had heard in his dream at Lahore – the Emperor Jalal-ud-din Muhammad Akbar
    More Details Hide Details In coming years, she took on numerous tough journeys to follow her husband, who was still in flight. First the beginning of the following December she and her new born went into camp at Jūn, after traveling for ten or twelve days.
    Two years later, after a perilous journey through the desert, on 22 August 1542, she and Emperor Humayun reached at the Umerkot ruled by Rana Prasad, a Hindu Sodha Rajput, at a small desert town, and the Rana gave them asylum.
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  • 1541
    The marriage took place on a day chosen by the Emperor, an avid astrologer, himself employing his astrolabe, at mid-day on a Monday in September, 1541 (Jumada al-awwal 948 AH) at Patr (known as Paat, Dadu District of Sindh).
    More Details Hide Details Thus she became his junior wife, after Bega Begum (later known as Haji Begum, after Hajji), who was his first wife and chief consort. Hamida Banu Begum is also known as Maryam Makani. The marriage became "politically beneficial" to Humayun as he got help from the rival Shia groups during times of war.
  • 1524
    Born in 1524.
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