Harold Lloyd
Actor
Harold Lloyd
Harold Clayton Lloyd, Sr. was an American film actor and producer, most famous for his silent comedies. Harold Lloyd ranks alongside Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton as one of the most popular and influential film comedians of the silent film era. Lloyd made nearly 200 comedy films, both silent and "talkies", between 1914 and 1947.
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Harold Lloyd's personal information overview.
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JP DEVINE: Jerry Lewis takes a bow - Morning Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
Jerry is probably the last of the great clowns, the slapstick geniuses that filled our screens from Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd. Like those greats, Jerry not only knows how to deliver a sight gag, but how to write, light,
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Hitchcock Blondes, Shipboard Affairs, Tropical Drama And Conversations with ... - TVbytheNumbers
Google News - over 5 years
The Alloy Orchestra, an innovative three-man musical ensemble that has written and performed live accompaniment to classic silent films for more than two decades, will perform their original score for Harold Lloyd's delightful comedy Speedy (1928)
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Full Weekend at Music Mountain in Falls Village - Hartford Courant
Google News - over 5 years
The evening will feature silent films such as Harold Lloyd's "Grandma's Boy" (1922) and Buster Keaton's "The High Sign" (1921) accompanied with live music by Donald Sosin on keyboard and singer Joanna Seaton on percussion. On Saturday Aug
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John Bengtson, archeologist of early cinema - San Francisco Chronicle (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
And just a couple of months ago, his trilogy was completed with the publication of Silent Visions: Discovering Early Hollywood and New York Through the Films of Harold Lloyd. Each features a forward by the Academy Award winning film historian Kevin
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Retrospective on great silent film comedians Charles Chaplin and Buster Keaton - 7thSpace Interactive (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
There will also be a special screening of Harold Lloyd's "Safety Last!" (1923). Lloyd, a popular and influential contemporary comedian, ranks alongside Chaplin and Keaton and was renowned for his stunts. Playing the role of a glasses-wearing
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VCS to screen silent film, perform score - TheReporter.com
Google News - over 5 years
The 1923 silent film "Safety Last," starring Harold Lloyd, with its justly famous building-climbing sequence, is not for those afraid of heights. After all, in those days the stunts were real -- directors and actors or their stand-ins used no wires,
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Apollo plans screening of classic comedy - Peoria Journal Star
Google News - over 5 years
By Anonymous Decades before Harry Potter popularized rounded eyeglasses, one of Hollywood's most popular comedy stars was the bespectacled Harold Lloyd, and downtown Peoria's Apollo Theater is showcasing him with a feature and a short subject on Aug
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Half Of A Lost Alfred Hitchcock Film Discovered In New Zealand - Cinema Blend
Google News - over 5 years
This website estimates that only 10 or 15% of the movies made in the silent era-- that is, before synchronized sound came around in 1929-- exist to this day, and that includes movies from legends like DW Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Eric
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Kirk vs. Picard, part 2: What about Captain Sisko? - Entertainment Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
And, yet, nobody ever seems to care much for a third choice when it's presented — I'm looking at you Harold Lloyd, Timothy Dalton, Wendy's, Ralph Nader. Earlier today, you witnessed my esteemed colleagues Darren Franich and Joseph Brannigan Lynch
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CALENDAR; Westchester
NYTimes - over 5 years
A guide to cultural and recreational events in the Hudson Valley. Items for the calendar should be sent at least three weeks in advance to westweek@nytimes.com. Comedy PIERMONT The Turning Point Al Lubel. Aug. 6 at 8 p.m. $20. The Turning Point, 468 Piermont Avenue. turningpointcafe.com; (845) 359-1089. POUGHKEEPSIE Bananas Comedy Club Sig Olney.
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The Big Parade and The General Arrive at Academy's Summer of Silents 7/18 - Broadway World
Google News - over 5 years
At 7 pm John Bengston will offer insights into the Los Angeles filming locations of silent stars Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd. The Medal of Honor, the first significant annual film award, pre-dating the establishment of the Oscars®,
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Legend3D trims local work force again - SignOnSanDiego.com
Google News - over 5 years
The classic Harold Lloyd movie “Safety Last!” was originally filmed in 1923 in 2- D black and white. Legend3D of San Diego converted it into a 3-D color movie for today's audiences, part of the its growing conversion business
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Discovering Southland history through silent movies - 89.3 KPCC (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The large-format books are terrific compilations of movie stills, maps, and current photos of locations used in films by Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd. The Lloyd book is just out. It's titled, Silent Visions: Discovering Early
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Harold Lloyd
    CHILDHOOD
  • 1971
    Lloyd died at age 77 from prostate cancer on March 8, 1971, in Beverly Hills, California.
    More Details Hide Details He was interred in a crypt in the Great Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery in Glendale, California.
  • 1969
    Davis died from a heart attack in 1969, two years before Lloyd's death.
    More Details Hide Details Though her real age was a guarded secret, a family spokesperson at the time indicated she was 66 years old. Lloyd's son was gay and, according to Annette D'Agostino Lloyd (no relation) in the book Harold Lloyd: Master Comedian, Harold Sr. took this in good spirit. Harold Jr. died from complications of a stroke three months to the day after his father.
  • OTHER
  • 1953
    In 1953, Lloyd received an Academy Honorary Award for being a "master comedian and good citizen".
    More Details Hide Details The second citation was a snub to Chaplin, who at that point had fallen foul of McCarthyism and who had had his entry visa to the United States revoked. Regardless of the political overtones, Lloyd accepted the award in good spirit.
    He appeared as the Mystery Guest on What's My Line? on April 26, 1953, and twice on This Is Your Life: on March 10, 1954 for Mack Sennett, and again on December 14, 1955, on his own episode.
    More Details Hide Details During both appearances, Lloyd's hand injury can clearly be seen. Lloyd studied colors, microscopy, and was very involved with photography, including 3D photography and color film experiments. Some of the earliest 2-color Technicolor tests were shot at his Beverly Hills home (These are included as extra material in the Harold Lloyd Comedy Collection DVD Box Set). He became known for his nude photographs of models, such as Bettie Page and stripper Dixie Evans, for a number of men's magazines. He also took photos of Marilyn Monroe lounging at his pool in a bathing suit, which were published after her death. In 2004, his granddaughter Suzanne produced a book of selections from his photographs, Harold Lloyd's Hollywood Nudes in 3D! (ISBN 1-57912-394-5). Lloyd also provided encouragement and support for a number of younger actors, such as Debbie Reynolds, Robert Wagner, and particularly Jack Lemmon, whom Harold declared as his own choice to play him in a movie of his life and work.
  • 1949
    He was a Past Potentate of Al-Malaikah Shrine in Los Angeles, and was eventually selected as Imperial Potentate of the Shriners of North America for the year 1949–50. At the installation ceremony for this position on July 25, 1949, 90,000 people were present at Soldier Field, including then sitting U.S. President Harry S Truman, also a 33° Scottish Rite Mason.
    More Details Hide Details In recognition of his services to the nation and Freemasonry, Bro. Lloyd was invested with the Rank and Decoration of Knight Commander Court of Honour in 1955 and coroneted an Inspector General Honorary, 33°, in 1965.
    He appeared as himself on several television shows during his retirement, first on Ed Sullivan's variety show Toast of the Town June 5, 1949, and again on July 6, 1958.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1944
    In October 1944, Lloyd emerged as the director and host of The Old Gold Comedy Theater, an NBC radio anthology series, after Preston Sturges, who had turned the job down, recommended him for it.
    More Details Hide Details The show presented half-hour radio adaptations of recently successful film comedies, beginning with Palm Beach Story with Claudette Colbert and Robert Young. Some saw The Old Gold Comedy Theater as being a lighter version of Lux Radio Theater, and it featured some of the best-known film and radio personalities of the day, including Fred Allen, June Allyson, Lucille Ball, Ralph Bellamy, Linda Darnell, Susan Hayward, Herbert Marshall, Dick Powell, Edward G. Robinson, Jane Wyman, and Alan Young. But the show's half-hour format—which meant the material might have been truncated too severely—and Lloyd's sounding somewhat ill at ease on the air for much of the season (though he spent weeks training himself to speak on radio prior to the show's premiere, and seemed more relaxed toward the end of the series run) may have worked against it. The Old Gold Comedy Theater ended in June 1945 with an adaptation of Tom, Dick and Harry, featuring June Allyson and Reginald Gardiner and was not renewed for the following season. Many years later, acetate discs of 29 of the shows were discovered in Lloyd's home, and they now circulate among old-time radio collectors.
  • 1940
    In 1940, Lloyd joined a neighborhood improvement association in Beverly Hills that attempted to enforce the all-white covenant in court after a number of black actors and businessmen had begun buying properties in the area.
    More Details Hide Details However, in his decision, federal judge Thurmond Clarke dismissed the action stating that it was time that "members of the Negro race are accorded, without reservations or evasions, the full rights guaranteed to them under the 14th amendment." In 1948 the United States Supreme Court declared in Shelley v. Kraemer that race-based restrictive covenants were unenforceable.
  • 1927
    Harold Lloyd has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 1927 his was only the fourth concrete ceremony at Grauman's Chinese Theatre, preserving his handprints, footprints, and autograph, along with the outline of his famed glasses (which were actually a pair of sunglasses with the lenses removed).
    More Details Hide Details The ceremony took place directly in front of the Hollywood Masonic Temple, which was the meeting place of the Masonic lodge to which he belonged. In 1994, he was honored with his image on a United States postage stamp designed by caricaturist Al Hirschfeld.
  • 1926
    Lloyd's Beverly Hills home, "Greenacres", was built in 1926–1929, with 44 rooms, 26 bathrooms, 12 fountains, 12 gardens, and a nine-hole golf course.
    More Details Hide Details A portion of Lloyd's personal inventory of his silent films (then estimated to be worth $2 million) was destroyed in August 1943 when his film vault caught fire. Seven firemen were overcome while inhaling chlorine gas from the blaze. Lloyd himself was saved by his wife, who dragged him to safety outdoors after he collapsed at the door of the film vault. The fire spared the main house and outbuildings. The estate left the possession of the Lloyd family in 1975 after an attempt to maintain it as a public museum. The grounds were subsequently subdivided but the main house and the estate's principal gardens remain and are frequently used for civic fundraising events and as a filming location, appearing in films like Westworld and The Loved One. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. As the Harold Lloyd Estate had been built within Beverly Hills in the 1920s, its location meant it was in one of Los Angeles' all-white planned communities. The area had restrictive covenants prohibiting non-whites (this also included Jews.) from owning or renting property unless they were in the employment of a white resident.
    In 1926, he became a 32° Scottish Rite Mason in the Valley of Los Angeles, California.
    More Details Hide Details He was vested with the Rank and Decoration of Knight Commander Court of Honor (KCCH) and eventually with the Inspector General Honorary, 33rd degree.
  • 1925
    In 1925, at the height of his movie career, Lloyd entered into Freemasonry at the Alexander Hamilton Lodge No. 535 of Hollywood, advancing quickly through both the York Rite and Scottish Rite, and then joined Al Malaikah Shrine in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details He took the degrees of the Royal Arch with his father.
  • 1924
    In 1924, Lloyd formed his own independent film production company, the Harold Lloyd Film Corporation, with his films distributed by Pathé and later Paramount and Twentieth Century-Fox.
    More Details Hide Details Lloyd was a founding member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Released a few weeks before the start of the Great Depression, Welcome Danger was a huge financial success, with audiences eager to hear Lloyd's voice on film. Lloyd's rate of film releases, which had been one or two a year in the 1920s, slowed to about one every two years until 1938. The films released during this period were: Feet First, with a similar scenario to Safety Last which found him clinging to a skyscraper at the climax; Movie Crazy with Constance Cummings; The Cat's-Paw, which was a dark political comedy and a big departure for Lloyd; and The Milky Way, which was Lloyd's only attempt at the fashionable genre of the screwball comedy film. To this point the films had been produced by Lloyd's company. However, his go-getting screen character was out of touch with Great Depression movie audiences of the 1930s. As the length of time between his film releases increased, his popularity declined, as did the fortunes of his production company. His final film of the decade, Professor Beware, was made by the Paramount staff, with Lloyd functioning only as actor and partial financier.
    Lloyd and Roach parted ways in 1924, and Lloyd became the independent producer of his own films.
    More Details Hide Details These included his most accomplished mature features Girl Shy, The Freshman (his highest-grossing silent feature), The Kid Brother, and Speedy, his final silent film. Welcome Danger (1929) was originally a silent film but Lloyd decided late in the production to remake it with dialogue. All of these films were enormously successful and profitable, and Lloyd would eventually become the highest paid film performer of the 1920s. They were also highly influential and still find many fans among modern audiences, a testament to the originality and film-making skill of Lloyd and his collaborators. From this success he became one of the wealthiest and most influential figures in early Hollywood.
  • 1923
    Lloyd married his leading lady, Mildred Davis, on Saturday, February 10, 1923 in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details They had two children together: Gloria Lloyd (1923-2012) and Harold Clayton Lloyd, Jr.. They also adopted Gloria Freeman (1924—1986) in September 1930, whom they renamed Marjorie Elizabeth Lloyd but was known as "Peggy" for most of her life. Lloyd discouraged Davis from continuing her acting career. He later relented but by that time her career momentum was lost.
  • 1921
    Beginning in 1921, Roach and Lloyd moved from shorts to feature-length comedies.
    More Details Hide Details These included the acclaimed Grandma's Boy, which (along with Chaplin's The Kid) pioneered the combination of complex character development and film comedy, the highly popular Safety Last! (1923), which cemented Lloyd's stardom (and is the oldest film on the American Film Institute's List of 100 Most Thrilling Movies), and Why Worry? (1923).
  • 1919
    Lloyd's career was not all laughs, however. In August 1919, while posing for some promotional still photographs in the Los Angeles Witzel Photography Studio, he was seriously injured holding a prop bomb thought merely to be a smoke pot.
    More Details Hide Details It exploded and mangled his hand, causing him to lose a thumb and forefinger. The blast was severe enough that the cameraman and prop director nearby were also seriously injured. Lloyd was in the act of lighting a cigarette from the fuse of the bomb when it exploded, also badly burning his face and chest and injuring his eye. Despite the proximity of the blast to his face, he retained his sight. As he recalled in 1930, "I thought I would surely be so disabled that I would never be able to work again. I didn't suppose that I would have one five-hundredth of what I have now. Still I thought, 'Life is worth while. Just to be alive. I still think so."
    Lloyd replaced Daniels with Mildred Davis in 1919.
    More Details Hide Details Lloyd was tipped off by Hal Roach to watch Davis in a movie. Reportedly, the more Lloyd watched Davis the more he liked her. Lloyd's first reaction in seeing her was that "she looked like a big French doll!" By 1918, Lloyd and Roach had begun to develop his character beyond an imitation of his contemporaries. Harold Lloyd would move away from tragicomic personas, and portray an everyman with unwavering confidence and optimism. The persona Lloyd referred to as his "Glass" character (often named "Harold" in the silent films) was a much more mature comedy character with greater potential for sympathy and emotional depth, and was easy for audiences of the time to identify with. The "Glass" character is said to have been created after Roach suggested that Harold was too handsome to do comedy without some sort of disguise. To create his new character Lloyd donned a pair of lensless horn-rimmed eyeglasses but wore normal clothing; previously, he had worn a fake mustache and ill-fitting clothes as the Chaplinesque "Lonesome Luke". "When I adopted the glasses," he recalled in a 1962 interview with Harry Reasoner, "it more or less put me in a different category because I became a human being. He was a kid that you would meet next door, across the street, but at the same time I could still do all the crazy things that we did before, but you believed them.
    In 1919, she left Lloyd to pursue her dramatic aspirations.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1914
    Lloyd hired Bebe Daniels as a supporting actress in 1914; the two of them were involved romantically and were known as "The Boy" and "The Girl."
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1913
    Lloyd began collaborating with Roach who had formed his own studio in 1913.
    More Details Hide Details Roach and Lloyd created "Lonesome Luke", similar to and playing off the success of Charlie Chaplin films.
  • 1912
    Lloyd had acted in theater since a child, but in California he began acting in one-reel film comedies around 1912.
    More Details Hide Details Lloyd worked with Thomas Edison's motion picture company, and his first role was a small part as a Yaqui Indian in the production of The Old Monk's Tale. At the age of 20, Harold moved to Los Angeles, and took up roles in several Keystone comedies. He was also hired by Universal as an extra and soon became friends with aspiring filmmaker, Hal Roach.
  • 1910
    In 1910, after his father succumbed to several failed business ventures, Lloyd's parents divorced and his father moved with his son to San Diego.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1893
    Lloyd was born in Burchard, Nebraska, on April 20, 1893, to James Darsie Lloyd and Sarah Elisabeth Fraser; his paternal great-grandparents were from Wales.
    More Details Hide Details
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