Harry Hopkins
American politician, 8th United States Secretary of Commerce
Harry Hopkins
Harry Lloyd Hopkins was an advisor to U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. He was one of the architects of the New Deal, especially the relief programs of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), which he directed and built into the largest employer in the country. In World War II he was Roosevelt's chief diplomatic advisor and troubleshooter and was a key policy maker in the $50 billion Lend Lease program that sent aid to the Allied nations.
Biography
Harry Hopkins's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of Harry Hopkins
News
News abour Harry Hopkins from around the web
Wine & Cheese Benefit Party - Salt Lake City Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
... is not allowed in 13 states, including Arizona, Colorado and Massachusetts, but it is here. So, order up a delicious Prime steak, and uncork one of those special bottles you've been saving. Quote of the week: Hunger is not debatable. —Harry Hopkins
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Orange election changes - Orange County Review
Google News - over 5 years
Council member Harry Hopkins also questioned changing the date of the elections, saying it may result in the loss of personality in the election. "When you stand at the firehouse, you know the voters are part of the town," he said
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Time for the jobless to march on Washington - CNN
Google News - over 5 years
They would naturally invoke the great precedent of the New Deal's Works Progress Administration, an agency that under the leadership of Harry Hopkins created jobs for the jobless almost overnight, thus providing some desperate and innocent people with
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Crossroads at Crabapple Antique and Art Festival - NorthFulton.com
Google News - over 5 years
Come, Enjoy, Buy 1890: Harry Hopkins, who organized the Works Projects Administration under President Roosevelt. 1892: Mae West, American actress in burlesque, vaudeville, Broadway and movies. 1943: Robert DeNiro, American actor, won oscars for his
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Is It 1937 All Over Again? - Business Insider
Google News - over 5 years
However, as FDR's closest aide Harry Hopkins famously said, “People don't eat in the long run; they eat every day!” And today's approach, if 1937 is a guide, could create not only more suffering but also less prosperity. In order to grow,
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Commentary: If only Washington would listen - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
But, as FDR's closest aide Harry Hopkins famously said, “People don't eat in the long run; they eat every day.” And today's approach will create not only more suffering but also less prosperity. In order to grow, the economy needs people who eat,
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Out, Out Damn Depression: FDR in 1938 - Right Side News
Google News - over 5 years
Roosevelt was now in the center of a tug-of-war with the spenders like Harry Hopkins, Aubrey Williams, Leon Henderson and Rex Tugwell on one side and Henry Morgenthau, the frightened spokesman for the conservatives, on the other
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Farmers spruce up market for opening next week - Scranton Times-Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
"Stuff grew well if you got it in the ground," said Harry Hopkins as he helped his grandson and a farm employee secure a rain gutter above the roof of his stall - "so when we back the truck up we don't get drowned." The gutters had to be reinstalled
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American History: A Friendship Helps Guide World War 2 Diplomacy - Voice of America
Google News - over 5 years
But the closeness of their friendship might be seen best in a story told by one of Roosevelt's close advisers, Harry Hopkins. Hopkins remembered how Churchill was visiting Roosevelt at the White House one day. Roosevelt went into Churchill's room in
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La economía aún es la clave - El Argentino
Google News - over 5 years
Harry Hopkins (funcionario de Franklin Delano Roosevelt) no tenía ni de lejos las reglas y regulaciones que tenemos ahora (en 1933, la Administración de Empleos Temporales de Hopkins dio trabajo a 4 millones de personas en un mes)
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Clinton's good ideas on jobs - Buffalo News
Google News - over 5 years
He points out that in 1933, with the nation in the depths of the Depression, President Franklin Roosevelt authorized Harry Hopkins to manage the Civil Works Administration. That act put four million unemployed Americans to work the first month
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Bill Clinton's Newsweek Cover Story Shows the Clinton-Obama Rivalry Is Not Dead - Fox News
Google News - over 5 years
He said "Harry Hopkins had nowhere near the rules and regulations we have now in 1933 civil works administration put four million to work in a month. I don't blame the people in the White House for getting shovel-ready projects off the ground
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Directly Hiring 4M Workers: "A Line in the Sand" for 2012 - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
{Harry Hopkins hired 4 million workers in 4 months during the Great Depression!] With the construction industry in the doldrums, there are plenty of people with skills that could be put to work retrofitting homes, and every kilowatt saved in lost
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Harry Hopkins
    FIFTIES
  • 1946
    Age 55
    Hopkins died in New York City on January 29, 1946, at the age of 55.
    More Details Hide Details His body was cremated and his ashes interred at his old hometown at the Hazelwood Cemetery in Grinnell, Iowa. There is a house on the Grinnell College campus named after him. World War II
  • 1943
    Age 52
    Hopkins ended his long White House stay on December 21, 1943, moving with his wife to a Georgetown townhouse.
    More Details Hide Details In mid-1939, Hopkins was told that he had stomach cancer, and doctors performed an extensive operation that removed 75% of his stomach. What remained of Hopkins' stomach struggled to digest proteins and fat, and a few months after the operation, doctors stated that he had only four weeks to live. At this point, Roosevelt brought in experts who transfused Hopkins with blood plasma that halted his deterioration. When the "Phony War" phase of World War II ended in May 1940, the situation galvanised Hopkins; as Doris Kearns Goodwin wrote, "the curative impact of Hopkins' increasingly crucial role in the war effort was to postpone the sentence of death the doctors had given him for five more years". Though his death has been attributed to his stomach cancer, some historians have suggested that it was the cumulative malnutrition related to his post-cancer digestive problems. Another claim is that Hopkins died from liver failure due to hepatitis or cirrhosis, but Robert Sherwood authoritatively reported that Hopkins' postmortem examination showed the cause of death was hemochromatosis due to hepatic iron accumulation from his many blood transfusions and iron supplements.
  • 1942
    Age 51
    In 1942, Hopkins married Louise Macy (1906-1963), his third and final marriage.
    More Details Hide Details Macy was a divorced, gregarious former editor for Harper's Bazaar. The two continued to live at the White House at Roosevelt's request, though Louise eventually demanded a home of their own.
    Roosevelt brought him along as advisor to his meetings with Churchill and Stalin at Cairo, Tehran, Casablanca in 1942-43, and Yalta in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details He was a firm supporter of China, which received Lend-Lease aid for its military and air force. Hopkins wielded more diplomatic power than the entire State Department. Hopkins helped identify and sponsor numerous potential leaders, including Dwight D. Eisenhower. He continued to live in the White House and saw the president more often than any other advisor. In mid-1943, Hopkins faced a barrage of criticism from Republicans and the press that he had abused his position for personal profit. One congressman asserted on the House floor that British media tycoon Lord Beaverbrook had given Hopkins' wife Louise $500,000 worth of emeralds, which Louise denied. Newspapers ran stories detailing sumptuous dinners that Hopkins attended while making public calls for sacrifice. Hopkins briefly considered suing the Chicago Tribune for libel after a story that compared him to Grigory Rasputin, the famous courtier of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, but was dissuaded by FDR.
  • 1941
    Age 50
    Hopkins promoted an aggressive war against Germany and successfully urged Roosevelt to use the Navy to protect convoys headed for Great Britain before the U.S. entered the war in December 1941.
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    He went to Moscow in July 1941 to make personal contact with Joseph Stalin.
    More Details Hide Details Hopkins recommended, and the president accepted, the inclusion of the Soviets in Lend Lease. He then accompanied Churchill to the Atlantic Conference.
    During the war years, Hopkins acted as Roosevelt's unofficial emissary to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. In January 1941 Roosevelt dispatched Hopkins to assess Britain's determination and situation.
    More Details Hide Details Churchill escorted this important visitor all over the United Kingdom. Before he returned, at a small dinner party in the North British Hotel, Glasgow, Hopkins rose to propose a toast. "I suppose you wish to know what I am going to say to President Roosevelt on my return. Well I am going to quote to you one verse from the Book of Books... 'Whither thou goest, I will go and where thou lodgest I will lodge, thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God.'" Hopkins became the administrator of the Lend-Lease programme, under which the United States gave or loaned to Free France, the United Kingdom, China, and other Allied nations food, oil, and materiel including warships, warplanes and weaponry in exchange for leases on army and naval bases in Allied territory. Hopkins had a major voice in policy for the vast $50 billion Lend-Lease program, especially regarding supplies, first for Britain and then (upon the German invasion) the USSR.
  • FORTIES
  • 1933
    Age 42
    In March 1933, Roosevelt summoned Hopkins to Washington as federal relief administrator.
    More Details Hide Details Convinced that paid work was psychologically more valuable than cash handouts, Hopkins sought to continue and expand New York State's work-relief programs, the Temporary Emergency Relief Administration. He supervised the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), and the Works Progress Administration (WPA). Over 90% of the people employed by the Hopkins programs were unemployed or on relief. He feuded with Harold Ickes, who ran a rival program - the Public Works Administration - which also created jobs but did not require applicants to be unemployed or on relief. FERA, the largest program from 1933 to 1935, involved giving money to localities to operate work relief projects to employ those on direct relief. CWA was similar, but did not require workers to be on relief in order to receive a government sponsored job. In less than four months, the CWA hired four million people, and during its five months of operation, the CWA built and repaired 200 swimming pools, 3,700 playgrounds, 40,000 schools, of road, and 12 million feet of sewer pipe.
  • 1932
    Age 41
    His efficient administration of the initial $20 million outlay to the agency gained Roosevelt's attention, and in 1932, he promoted Hopkins to the presidency of the agency.
    More Details Hide Details Hopkins and Eleanor Roosevelt began a long friendship, which strengthened his role in relief programs.
  • 1931
    Age 40
    In 1931, Hopkins married Barbara Duncan, who died of cancer six years later.
    More Details Hide Details They had one daughter, Diana.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1930
    Age 39
    They had three sons: David, Robert, and Stephen, and though Gross divorced Hopkins in 1930 shortly before Hopkins became a public figure, the two kept up an intimate correspondence until 1945.
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  • 1924
    Age 33
    In mid-1924 he became executive director of the New York Tuberculosis Association. During his tenure, the agency grew enormously and absorbed the New York Heart Association. In 1931, New York Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt named R. H. Macy's department store president Jesse Straus as president of the Temporary Emergency Relief Administration (TERA).
    More Details Hide Details Straus named Hopkins, then unknown to Roosevelt, as TERA's executive director.
  • 1923
    Age 32
    Hopkins helped draft a charter for the American Association of Social Workers (AASW) and was elected its president in 1923.
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  • 1922
    Age 31
    In 1922, Hopkins returned to New York City where the AICP was involved with the Milbank Memorial Fund and the State Charities Aid Association in running three health demonstrations in New York State.
    More Details Hide Details Hopkins became manager of the Bellevue-Yorkville health project and assistant director of the AICP.
  • 1921
    Age 30
    Eventually, the Gulf Division of the Red Cross merged with the Southwestern Division and Hopkins, headquartered now in Atlanta, was appointed general manager in 1921.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1917
    Age 26
    Hopkins at first opposed America's entrance into World War I, but, when war was declared in 1917, he supported it enthusiastically.
    More Details Hide Details He was rejected for the draft because of a bad eye. Hopkins moved to New Orleans where he worked for the American Red Cross as director of Civilian Relief, Gulf Division.
  • 1915
    Age 24
    In 1915, New York City Mayor John Purroy Mitchel appointed Hopkins executive secretary of the Bureau of Child Welfare which administered pensions to mothers with dependent children.
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    During the 1915 recession, Hopkins and the AICP's William Matthews, with $5,000 from Elizabeth Milbank Anderson's Milbank Memorial Fund, organized the Bronx Park Employment program, one of the first public employment programs in the U.S.
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  • 1913
    Age 22
    In 1913, Hopkins married Ethel Gross, a Hungarian-Jewish immigrant active in New York City's Progressive movement.
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    In the spring of 1913, he accepted a position from John A. Kingsbury of the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor (AICP) as "friendly visitor" and superintendent of the Employment Bureau within the AICP's Department of Family Welfare.
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  • 1912
    Age 21
    Hopkins attended Grinnell College and soon after his graduation in 1912 took a job with Christodora House, a social settlement house in New York City's Lower East Side ghetto.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1890
    Born
    Born in 1890.
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