Harry Richman
American aviator
Harry Richman
Harry Richman was an American entertainer. He was a singer, actor, dancer, comedian, pianist, songwriter, bandleader, and night club performer, at his most popular in the 1920s and 1930s. Richman was born as Harold Reichman in Cincinnati, Ohio. He changed his name to "Harry Richman" at age 18, by which time he was already a professional entertainer in vaudeville. He worked as a piano accompanist to such stars as Mae West and Nora Bayes.
Biography
Harry Richman's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Harry Richman
News
News abour Harry Richman from around the web
Millburn-Short Hills Youth Baseball Roundup - NorthJersey.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Adam Coussin recorded two assists and Sam Rubenstein went 3-for-3 for the Brewers. The Angels beat the Twins 23-22 behind Nihaar Gopalji (four hits, four RBI) and Harry Richman (three hits, three RBI) propelled the Angels to a 23-22 defeat of the Twins
Article Link:
Google News article
Millburn Soccer Club roundup - NorthJersey.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Alfie Smith and Harry Richman each scored a goal, pacing the Millburn Gunners to a 2-0 of the Greater Flemington Knights. Smith scored off a cross from Jake Zirlin. Bennett Murphy, Alex Marx, Alexander Rothe and Malcolm Migoya anchored the Gunners'
Article Link:
Google News article
Paid Notice: Deaths RICHMAN, HARRY
NYTimes - almost 17 years
RICHMAN-Harry. 84 years. Died April 24, 2000. Beloved husband of Henrietta, loving father of Joyce and Michael and their spouses, dearest grandfather to Elliot, Stacy, Melissa and Samuel. Nothing gave him more pleasure than his family. Outstanding sales leader in the dental industry. Confidante and mentor to so many who cherished his advice and
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Ray Forrest Is Dead at 83; Nation's First TV Personality
NYTimes - almost 18 years
Ray Forrest, who worked for many years at his family's jewelry store in Paterson, N.J., died on March 11 at a hospital near his home in Kinnelon, N.J. He was 83 and all but forgotten as the man who became a hero to hundreds in 1939 as the nation's first television personality. If Mr. Forrest is better remembered among older New York television
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Jule Styne, Bountiful Creator Of Song Favorites, Dies at 88
NYTimes - over 22 years
Jule Styne, the versatile, prolific songwriter whose tunes became standards for three generations and the composer of such classic Broadway musicals as "Gypsy," "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" and "Funny Girl," died yesterday at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. He was 88 and lived in Manhattan. The cause was heart failure, said Shirley Herz, his press
Article Link:
NYTimes article
RECORD NOTES; Reissue Series Traces the Early Development of Genius
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: The Verdi scholar Julian Budden, writing in his ''Operas of Verdi'' (Oxford) of the composer's early works, says there is no opera from those pre-''Rigoletto'' years ''which does not show an interesting musical advance in some quarter, even if the work is unsatisfactory as a whole.'' Unfortunately, not many operagoers have had the chance to
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Books of The Times
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: Clara Bow Runnin' Wild By David Stenn 338 pages. Illustrated. Doubleday. $18.95. Clara Bow Runnin' Wild By David Stenn 338 pages. Illustrated. Doubleday. $18.95. Clara Bow was the greatest box-office draw of her day; at the height of her fame, in 1929, she received 45,000 fan letters in the course of a single month. But on the whole she has
Article Link:
NYTimes article
THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - almost 30 years
LEAD: THE rain splattering the windowpanes added some notes Handel never wrote, but the New York Harp Ensemble played on and Eva Marton lifted her glorious voice above it all at Monday night's musicale in Jenifer and George Lang's West Side apartment. Then the guests - who included Marion and Elie Wiesel, Renate Ponsold and Robert Motherwell,
Article Link:
NYTimes article
STAGE VIEW; IRVING BERLIN AT 98 IS STILL THE GREATEST
NYTimes - almost 31 years
It would be impossible to celebrate Christmas or Easter, salute the flag, march in a parade or serve in the armed forces without paying homage to Irving Berlin. For almost 80 years, America - and the world - has been singing and dancing to his music. He is our most virtuosic songwriter, a title that he has always preferred to that of composer. Cole
Article Link:
NYTimes article
MUSIC/NOTED IN BRIEF; Julie Wilson Sings Works by Irving Berlin
NYTimes - almost 31 years
During the past two years, Julie Wilson has performed highly acclaimed cabaret programs of the songs of Cole Porter, Stephen Sondheim, Rodgers and Hart, George and Ira Gershwin and Kurt Weill. Now, returning to the Oak Room of the Algonquin Hotel, 59 West 44th Street, she has arrived at the songs of Irving Berlin. Mr. Berlin is something else. He
Article Link:
NYTimes article
ARCHIVES FOR PAPERS OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT VERY
NYTimes - about 32 years
Two decades ago Howard B. Gotlieb went to work for the library at Boston University and began collecting the personal papers not only of distinguished 20th-century authors but also of journalists, mystery writers, cartoonists, movie actors and similar figures, many less than famous. When Dr. Gotlieb moved to Boston University from a job as
Article Link:
NYTimes article
IRVING BERLIN IS BACK ON THE POP CHARTS
NYTimes - over 33 years
Irving Berlin is back in the pop top 10. ''Puttin' on the Ritz,'' which Mr. Berlin wrote for the 1930 musical of the same title, has become an international best seller all over again. The film featured Harry Richman and Joan Bennett, but the song later became associated with Fred Astaire. It has been remade by Taco, a Dutch singer and arranger
Article Link:
NYTimes article
DICK MERRILL, PILOT, IS DEAD AT 88; HELD SEVERAL RECORDS IN AVIATION
NYTimes - over 34 years
Henry Tindall (Dick) Merrill, a pioneer aviator who in 1936 made the first trans-Atlantic round-trip flight in an airplane, died Sunday at his summer home in Lake Elsinore, Calif. He was 88 years old. Mr. Merrill set several commercial flying records, including the first commercial trans-Atlantic flight in a plane in 1937. The trip attracted added
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Harry Richman
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1972
    Age 76
    Died in 1972.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1966
    Age 70
    His autobiography A Hell of a Life was published in 1966.
    More Details Hide Details Harry Richman died in Hollywood, California.
  • FORTIES
  • 1942
    Age 46
    By 1942 Forbes was divorced from Richman.
    More Details Hide Details Richman largely retired in the 1940s, although he made irregular appearances, including on television, into the 1950s.
  • 1938
    Age 42
    He married Hazel Forbes, show girl and Ziegfeld Girl, in March 1938, in Palm Springs, California.
    More Details Hide Details He and Forbes shared a sumptuous home in Beechurst, Long Island. Shortly after their wedding Forbes contracted pneumonia and was saved, in part, through the use of the drug sulfanilamide. The couple considered adopting a baby.
  • 1936
    Age 40
    Richman was also an amateur aviator of some accomplishment, being the co-pilot in 1936, with famed flyer Henry Tindall "Dick" Merrill, of the first round-trip transatlantic flight in his own single-engine Vultee transport.
    More Details Hide Details Richman had filled much of the empty space of the aircraft with ping pong balls as a flotation aid in case they were forced down in the Atlantic, and after the successful flight he sold autographed ones until his death. They continue to turn up on eBay to this day. He also made regular radio broadcasts in the 1930s.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1931
    Age 35
    His yacht Chevalier II exploded in July 1931.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1930
    Age 34
    He made his feature movie debut in Hollywood in 1930 with the film Puttin' on the Ritz, featuring the Irving Berlin song of the same title, which gave Richman a phonograph record hit that year.
    More Details Hide Details His film career was short lived due to his somewhat overpowering personality, and his limited acting skills. This made little difference to his career as he remained a popular nightclub host and stage performer. Leonard Maltin is widely quoted as having written of Puttin' on the Ritz: "A songwriter drinks and goes blind – after seeing this you'll want to do the same". In fact the actual quote is "Famed nightclub entertainer Richman made his film debut in this primitive early talkie about vaudevillian who can't handle success and turns to drink. You may do the same after watching Richman's performance – though he does introduce the title song by Irving Berlin."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1922
    Age 26
    With Bayes' act he made his Broadway debut in 1922.
    More Details Hide Details He appeared in several editions of the George White's Scandals in the 1920s to acclaim. He appeared in the 1931 Ziegfeld Follies.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1895
    Born
    Born in 1895.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)