Harvey Milk
American politician
Harvey Milk
Harvey Bernard Milk was an American politician who became the first openly gay man to be elected to public office in California when he won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. Politics and gay activism were not his early interests; he was not open about his homosexuality and did not participate in civic matters until around the age of 40, after his experiences in the counterculture of the 1960s.
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Harvey Milk's personal information overview.
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MOVIE REVIEW | 'WE WERE HERE'; In a City's Plague Years, Caring for Their Own
NYTimes - over 5 years
''There was nothing extraordinary about the fact that you lose the people you love because it's going to happen to all of us,'' observes Ed Wolf, a gentle, gay San Franciscan in his mid-50s who devoted years to counseling dying AIDS patients during the peak of the epidemic. ''It's just that it happened in this targeted community of people who were
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NYTimes article
One City's Plague Years, In Small Details
NYTimes - over 5 years
SAN FRANCISCO THE AIDS epidemic has been the subject of countless efforts at exploration and explanation in all manner of media, from popular films like ''Philadelphia,'' to Pulitzer Prize-winning dramas like ''Angels in America,'' to television tear-jerkers like ''The Ryan White Story.'' But few treatments, dramatic or otherwise, have tried to
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NYTimes article
Important to always live life to the fullest - Times-Delphic
Google News - over 5 years
The world is lucky to have individuals such as Mike Gronstal, Harvey Milk, Martin Luther King Jr., Abraham Lincoln or even Tank Man. These individuals found something worth fighting for. I wish to see humanity take on some of its modern challenges with
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Where Are All of Mayor Ed Lee's Endorsements? - SF Weekly (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
For an incumbent mayor, Lee is certainly getting snubbed; in the last few weeks, the League of Conservation Voters, Central City Democrats, the Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club, came out with their endorsements -- and it wasn't Lee
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Political Notebook: LGBT Democratic clubs weigh in on SF races - Bay Area Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
As expected the Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club has endorsed progressive District 11 Supervisor John Avalos to be San Francisco's next mayor, while the more moderate Alice B. Toklas LGBT Democratic Club is set to give its first
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Avalos Wins Harvey Milk Club Sole Endorsement - Fog City Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Supervisor and mayoral candidate John Avalos won the coveted Harvey Milk Democratic Club's (HMDC) sole endorsement last eve in the ranked-choice race for mayor, though a second vote in September is likely to result in City Attorney
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Neighbors help out Milk school - Bay Area Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Will Yates, a third grader at the Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy, and his mother, Liz, demonstrated the puppet theater, one of the items for sale at the neighborhood yard sale on Hartford Street that took place August 13. Organized by Mark McHale and
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FBI releases new files on Milk, Moscone, and White - Bay Area Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
The Federal Bureau of Investigation has released a new batch of files detailing its various investigations into corruption accusations against former San Francisco Mayor George Moscone, gay former Supervisor Harvey Milk,
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Protest Against West Draws Over 100 - SouthFloridaGayNews.com
Google News - over 5 years
... Hall Square in WiltonManors, with speaker after speaker taking Congressman Allen West to task for his words that 'denigrate the LGBT community,' according to keynote speaker Stuart Milk, nephew of legendary San Francisco gay activist Harvey Milk
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Stratton Pollitzer of Equality Florida to be honored by Harvey Milk Foundation ... - MiamiHerald.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Stratton Pollitzer of Equality Florida to be honored by Harvey Milk Foundation Aug. 28 in Miami Beach We're thrilled to present the Harvey B. Milk Foundation Honors Medal to Stratton Pollitzer in recognition of his outstanding leadership through his
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A Wedding? Oh, Yes, We Did That, Too
NYTimes - over 5 years
MY parents, Betty and Terry Doonan, met in a Royal Air Force soup kitchen at the end of World War II. They had both run away from home a few years prior and were disinclined to return to their respective birthplaces. Eight weeks after their first encounter, they went to a registry office with two pals and got hitched. No family. No white dress. No
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NYTimes article
Illuminating California's Proposition 8 Trial, Onstage
NYTimes - over 5 years
A new play based on the Proposition 8 trial over same-sex marriage in California, written by the Academy Award winner Dustin Lance Black (''Milk''), will be performed in a staged reading on Broadway in September and then produced at Carnegie Mellon University, Northwestern, the University of Michigan, and elsewhere. Mr. Black and other supporters
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NYTimes article
California To Require Gay History In Schools
NYTimes - over 5 years
LOS ANGELES -- California will become the first state to require public schools to teach gay and lesbian history. As expected, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill on Thursday that mandates that the contributions of gays and lesbians in the state and the country be included in social science instruction and in textbooks. School districts will have until
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NYTimes article
PMSing? Drink Milk and Get Over It - The Female Fan
Google News - over 5 years
... god they don't -- my guess is, they'd try to use it as an excuse for taking out their enemies, a la Dan White's notorious Twinkie defense (he claimed the sugar high from eating a bucket load of Twinkies caused him to shoot and kill Harvey Milk)
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Harvey Milk
    FORTIES
  • 1978
    Age 47
    Harry Britt summarized Milk's impact the evening Milk was shot in 1978: "No matter what the world has taught us about ourselves, we can be beautiful and we can get our thing together...
    More Details Hide Details Harvey was a prophet... he lived by a vision... Something very special is going to happen in this city and it will have Harvey Milk's name on it." In 2012, Milk was inducted into the Legacy Walk, an outdoor public display which celebrates LGBT history and people.
    It took eight weeks to film, and often used extras who had been present at the actual events for large crowd scenes, including a scene depicting Milk's "Hope Speech" at the 1978 Gay Freedom Day Parade.
    More Details Hide Details Milk was included in the "Time 100 Heroes and Icons of the 20th Century" as "a symbol of what gays can accomplish and the dangers they face in doing so". Despite his antics and publicity stunts, according to writer John Cloud, "none understood how his public role could affect private lives better than Milk... he knew that the root cause of the gay predicament was invisibility". The Advocate listed Milk third in their "40 Heroes" of the 20th century issue, quoting Dianne Feinstein: "His homosexuality gave him an insight into the scars which all oppressed people wear. He believed that no sacrifice was too great a price to pay for the cause of human rights." In August 2009, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Milk the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his contribution to the gay rights movement stating "he fought discrimination with visionary courage and conviction". Milk's nephew Stuart accepted for his uncle. Shortly after, Stuart co-founded the Harvey Milk Foundation with Anne Kronenberg with the support of Desmond Tutu, co-recipient of 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom and now a member of the Foundation's Advisory Board. Later in the year, California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger designated May 22 as "Harvey Milk Day", and inducted Milk in the California Hall of Fame.
    The San Francisco Gay Democratic Club changed its name to the Harvey Milk Memorial Gay Democratic Club in 1978 (it is currently named the Harvey Milk Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Democratic Club) and boasts that it is the largest Democratic organization in San Francisco.
    More Details Hide Details In New York City, Harvey Milk High School is a school program for at-risk youth that concentrates on the needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students and operates out of the Hetrick Martin Institute. In July 2016, US Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus advised Congress that he intended to name the second ship of the Military Sealift Command's John Lewis-class oilers, USNS Harvey Milk. All ships of the class are to be named after civil rights leaders. In 1982, freelance reporter Randy Shilts completed his first book: a biography of Milk, titled The Mayor of Castro Street. Shilts wrote the book while unable to find a steady job as an openly gay reporter. The Times of Harvey Milk, a documentary film based on the book's material, won the 1984 Academy Award for Documentary Feature. Director Rob Epstein spoke later about why he chose the subject of Milk's life: "At the time, for those of us who lived in San Francisco, it felt like it was life changing, that all the eyes of the world were upon us, but in fact most of the world outside of San Francisco had no idea. It was just a really brief, provincial, localized current events story that the mayor and a city council member in San Francisco were killed. It didn't have much reverberation."
    On November 10, 1978, 10 months after being sworn in, White resigned his position on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, saying that his annual salary of $9,600 was not enough to support his family."Mayor Hunts a Successor for White", The San Francisco Examiner, (November 11, 1978), p. 1.
    More Details Hide Details Within days, White requested that his resignation be withdrawn and he be reinstated, and Mayor Moscone initially agreed.Ledbetter, Les (November 29, 1978). "2 Deaths Mourned by San Franciscans", The New York Times, p. 1. However, further consideration—and intervention by other supervisors—convinced Moscone to appoint someone more in line with the growing ethnic diversity of White's district and the liberal leanings of the Board of Supervisors. "Another Day of Death", Time, December 11, 1978. Retrieved on September 6, 2008. On November 18 and 19, news broke of the murder of California Representative Leo Ryan, who was in Jonestown, Guyana to check on the remote community built by members of the Peoples Temple who had relocated from San Francisco, and the mass suicide of 900 members of the Peoples Temple. Dan White remarked to two aides who were working for his reinstatement, "You see that? One day I'm on the front page and the next I'm swept right off."
    California State Senator John Briggs saw an opportunity in the Christian fundamentalists' campaign. He was hoping to be elected governor of California in 1978, and was impressed with the voter turnout he saw in Miami.
    More Details Hide Details When Briggs returned to Sacramento, he wrote a bill that would ban gays and lesbians from teaching in public schools throughout California. Briggs claimed in private that he had nothing against gays, telling gay journalist Randy Shilts, "It's politics. Just politics." Random attacks on gays rose in the Castro. When the police response was considered inadequate, groups of gays patrolled the neighborhood themselves, on alert for attackers. On June 21, 1977, a gay man named Robert Hillsborough died from 15 stab wounds while his attackers gathered around him and chanted "Faggot!" Both Mayor Moscone and Hillsborough's mother blamed Anita Bryant and John Briggs. One week prior to the incident, Briggs had held a press conference at San Francisco City Hall where he called the city a "sexual garbage heap" because of homosexuals. Weeks later, 250,000 people attended the 1977 San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade, the largest attendance at any Gay Pride event to that point.
    On November 27, 1978, Milk and Mayor George Moscone were assassinated by Dan White, another city supervisor who had recently resigned to pursue a private business enterprise but who had sought his position back after that endeavor failed.
    More Details Hide Details Despite his short career in politics, Milk became an icon in San Francisco and a martyr in the gay community. In 2002, Milk was called "the most famous and most significantly open LGBT official ever elected in the United States". Anne Kronenberg, his final campaign manager, wrote of him: "What set Harvey apart from you or me was that he was a visionary. He imagined a righteous world inside his head and then he set about to create it for real, for all of us." Milk was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. Milk was born in Woodmere, New York, to William Milk and Minerva Karns. He was the younger son of Lithuanian Jewish parents and the grandson of Morris Milk, a department store owner who helped to organize the first synagogue in the area. As a child, Harvey was teased for his protruding ears, big nose, and oversized feet, and tended to grab attention as a class clown. He played football in school, and developed a passion for opera; in his teens, he acknowledged his homosexuality to himself, but kept it a closely guarded secret. Under his name in the high school yearbook, it read, "Glimpy Milk—and they say WOMEN are never at a loss for words".
  • 1977
    Age 46
    He was to have received an award the next week for rescuing a woman and child from a 17-story burning building when he was a firefighter in 1977.
    More Details Hide Details Though he was the only supervisor to vote against Milk's gay rights ordinance earlier that year, he had been quoted as saying, "I respect the rights of all people, including gays". Milk and White at first got along well. One of White's political aides (who was gay) remembered, "Dan had more in common with Harvey than he did with anyone else on the board". White had voted to support a center for gay seniors, and to honor Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin's 25th anniversary and pioneering work. Harvey Milk's hard work and accomplishments on behalf of all San Franciscans earned him widespread respect and support. His life is an inspiration to all people committed to equal opportunity and an end to bigotry. After Milk's vote for the mental health facility in White's district, however, White refused to speak with Milk and only communicated with one of Milk's aides. Other acquaintances remembered White as very intense. "He was impulsive... He was an extremely competitive man, obsessively so... I think he could not take defeat," San Francisco's assistant fire chief told reporters. White's first campaign manager quit in the middle of the campaign, and told a reporter that White was an egotist and it was clear that he was antigay, though he denied it in the press. White's associates and supporters described him "as a man with a pugilistic temper and an impressive capacity for nurturing a grudge".
    On election day, November 8, 1977, he won by 30% against sixteen other candidates, and after his victory became apparent, he arrived on Castro Street on the back of his campaign manager's motorcycle—escorted by Sheriff Richard Hongisto—to what a newspaper story described as a "tumultuous and moving welcome".
    More Details Hide Details Milk had recently taken a new lover, a young man named Jack Lira, who was frequently drunk in public, and just as often escorted out of political events by Milk's aides. Since the race for the California State Assembly, Milk had been receiving increasingly violent death threats. Concerned that his raised profile marked him as a target for assassination, he recorded on tape his thoughts, and whom he wanted to succeed him if he were killed, adding: "If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door". Milk's swearing-in made national headlines, as he became the first non-incumbent openly gay man in the United States to win an election for public office.Cone, Russ (January 8, 1978). "Feinstein Board President", The San Francisco Examiner, p. 1. He likened himself to pioneering African American baseball player Jackie Robinson and walked to City Hall arm in arm with Jack Lira, stating "You can stand around and throw bricks at Silly Hall or you can take it over. Well, here we are." The Castro District was not the only neighborhood to promote someone new to city politics. Sworn in with Milk were also a single mother (Carol Ruth Silver), a Chinese American (Gordon Lau), and an African American woman (Ella Hill Hutch)—all firsts for the city. Daniel White, a former police officer and firefighter, was also a first-time supervisor, and he spoke of how proud he was that his grandmother was able to see him sworn in.Ledbetter, Les (January 12, 1978). "San Francisco Legislators Meet in Diversity", The New York Times, p.
  • 1976
    Age 45
    Keeping his promise to Milk, newly elected Mayor George Moscone appointed him to the Board of Permit Appeals in 1976, making him the first openly gay city commissioner in the United States.
    More Details Hide Details Milk, however, considered seeking a position in the California State Assembly. The district was weighted heavily in his favor, as much of it was based in neighborhoods surrounding Castro Street, where Milk's sympathizers voted. In the previous race for supervisor, Milk received more votes than the currently seated assemblyman. However, Moscone had made a deal with the assembly speaker that another candidate should run—Art Agnos. Furthermore, by order of the mayor, neither appointed nor elected officials were allowed to run a campaign while performing their duties. Milk spent five weeks on the Board of Permit Appeals before Moscone was forced to fire him when he announced he would run for the California State Assembly. Rick Stokes replaced him. Milk's firing, and the backroom deal made between Moscone, the assembly speaker, and Agnos, fueled his campaign as he took on the identity of a political underdog. He railed that high officers in the city and state governments were against him. He complained that the prevailing gay political establishment, particularly the Alice B. Toklas Memorial Democratic Club, were shutting him out; he referred to Jim Foster and Stokes as gay "Uncle Toms". He enthusiastically embraced a local independent weekly magazine's headline: "Harvey Milk vs. The Machine".
  • 1975
    Age 44
    Milk's role as a representative of San Francisco's gay community expanded during this period. On September 22, 1975, President Gerald Ford, while visiting San Francisco, walked from his hotel to his car.
    More Details Hide Details In the crowd, Sara Jane Moore raised a gun to shoot him. A former Marine who had been walking by grabbed her arm as the gun discharged toward the pavement. The bystander was Oliver "Bill" Sipple, who had left Milk's ex-lover Joe Campbell years before, prompting Campbell's suicide attempt. The national spotlight was on him immediately. On psychiatric disability leave from the military, Sipple refused to call himself a hero and did not want his sexuality disclosed. Milk, however, took advantage of the opportunity to illustrate his cause that public perception of gay people would be improved if they came out of the closet. He told a friend: "It's too good an opportunity. For once we can show that gays do heroic things, not just all that ca-ca about molesting children and hanging out in bathrooms." Milk contacted a newspaper.Morain, Dan (February 13, 1989). "Sorrow Trailed a Veteran Who Saved a President and Then Was Cast in an Unwanted Spotlight", The Los Angeles Times, p. 1.
    Although he was a newcomer to the Castro District, Milk had shown leadership in the small community. He was starting to be taken seriously as a candidate and decided to run again for supervisor in 1975.
    More Details Hide Details He reconsidered his approach and cut his long hair, swore off marijuana, and vowed never to visit another gay bathhouse again. Milk's campaigning earned the support of the teamsters, firefighters, and construction unions. Castro Camera became the center of activity in the neighborhood. Milk would often pull people off the street to work his campaigns for him—many discovered later that they just happened to be the type of men Milk found attractive. Milk favored support for small businesses and the growth of neighborhoods. Since 1968, Mayor Alioto had been luring large corporations to the city despite what critics labeled "the Manhattanization of San Francisco". As blue-collar jobs were replaced by the service industry, Alioto's weakened political base allowed for new leadership to be voted into office in the city. George Moscone was elected mayor. Moscone had been instrumental in repealing the sodomy law earlier that year in the California State Legislature. He acknowledged Milk's influence in his election by visiting Milk's election night headquarters, thanking Milk personally, and offering him a position as a city commissioner. Milk came in seventh place in the election, only one position away from earning a supervisor seat. Liberal politicians held the offices of the mayor, district attorney, and sheriff.
  • 1974
    Age 43
    Milk organized the Castro Street Fair in 1974 to attract more customers to the area.
    More Details Hide Details More than 5,000 attended, and some of the EVMA members were stunned; they did more business at the Castro Street Fair than on any previous day.
  • 1973
    Age 42
    Milk's fiery, flamboyant speeches and savvy media skills earned him a significant amount of press during the 1973 election.
    More Details Hide Details He earned 16,900 votes—sweeping the Castro District and other liberal neighborhoods and coming in 10th place out of 32 candidates. Had the elections been reorganized to allow districts to elect their own supervisors, he would have won. Milk displayed an affinity for building coalitions from early in his political career. The Teamsters wanted to strike against beer distributors—Coors in particular—who refused to sign the union contract. An organizer asked Milk for assistance with gay bars; in return, Milk asked the union to hire more gay drivers. A few days later, Milk canvassed the gay bars in and surrounding the Castro District, urging them to refuse to sell the beer. With the help of a coalition of Arab and Chinese grocers the Teamsters had also recruited, the boycott was successful. Milk found a strong political ally in organized labor, and it was around this time that he began to style himself "The Mayor of Castro Street". As Castro Street's presence grew, so did Milk's reputation. Tom O'Horgan remarked, "Harvey spent most of his life looking for a stage. On Castro Street he finally found it."
    Milk became more interested in political and civic matters when he was faced with civic problems and policies he disliked. One day in 1973, a state bureaucrat entered Milk's shop Castro Camera and informed him that he owed $100 as a deposit against state sales tax.
    More Details Hide Details Milk was incredulous and traded shouts with the man about the rights of business owners; after he complained for weeks at state offices, the deposit was reduced to $30. Milk fumed about government priorities when a teacher came into his store to borrow a projector because the equipment in the schools did not function. Friends also remember around the same time having to restrain him from kicking the television while Attorney General John N. Mitchell gave consistent "I don't recall" replies during the Watergate hearings. Milk decided that the time had come to run for city supervisor. He said later, "I finally reached the point where I knew I had to become involved or shut up". Milk's reception by the gay political establishment in San Francisco was icy. Jim Foster, who had by then been active in gay politics for 10 years, resented the newcomer's asking for his endorsement for a position as prestigious as city supervisor. Foster told Milk, "There's an old saying in the Democratic Party. You don't get to dance unless you put up the chairs. I've never seen you put up the chairs." Milk was furious at the patronizing snub, and the conversation marked the beginning of an antagonistic relationship between the "Alice" Club and Harvey Milk. Some gay bar owners, still battling police harassment and unhappy with what they saw as a timid approach by Alice to established authority in the city, decided to endorse him.
  • 1972
    Age 41
    His speech at the 1972 Democratic National Convention ensured that his voice, according to San Francisco politicians, was the one to be heard when they wanted the opinions, and especially the votes, of the gay community.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1970
    Age 39
    In 1970, increasingly frustrated with the political climate after the U.S. invasion of Cambodia, Milk let his hair grow long.
    More Details Hide Details When told to cut it, he refused and was fired. Milk drifted from California to Texas to New York, without a steady job or plan. In New York City he became involved with O'Horgan's theater company as a "general aide", signing on as associate producer for Lenny and for Eve Merriam's Inner City. The time he had spent with the cast of flower children wore away much of Milk's conservatism. A contemporary New York Times story about O'Horgan described Milk as "a sad eyed man—another aging hippie with long, long hair, wearing faded jeans and pretty beads". Craig Rodwell read the description of the formerly uptight man and wondered if it could be the same person. One of Milk's Wall Street friends worried that he seemed to have no plan or future, but remembered Milk's attitude: "I think he was happier than at any time I had ever seen him in his entire life."
  • 1964
    Age 33
    When McKinley first began his relationship with Milk in late 1964, he was 16 years old.
    More Details Hide Details He was prone to depression and sometimes threatened to commit suicide if Milk did not show him enough attention. To make a point to McKinley, Milk took him to the hospital where Milk's ex-lover, Joe Campbell, was himself recuperating from a suicide attempt, after his lover Billy Sipple left him. Milk had remained friendly with Campbell, who had entered the avant-garde art scene in Greenwich Village, but Milk did not understand why Campbell's despondency was sufficient cause to consider suicide as an option. The Eureka Valley of San Francisco, where Market and Castro Streets intersect, had for decades been a blue-collar Irish Catholic neighborhood synonymous with the Most Holy Redeemer Parish (a few Lutherans of Scandinavian ancestry also lived in the neighborhood). Beginning in the late 1960s, however, young families left the neighborhood and moved to Bay Area suburbs, and the city's economic base eroded as factories moved to cheaper locations nearby and blue-collar port jobs relocated to Oakland. Mayor Joseph Alioto, proud of his working-class background and supporters, based his political career on welcoming developers to provide construction jobs and attracting a Roman Catholic Cardinal to the city. Many blue-collar workers—often Alioto supporters—lost their jobs as large corporations with service industry positions replaced factory and dry dock jobs. San Francisco, which had been "a city of villages", a decentralized city with discrete ethnic enclaves surrounding a local high street, began a demographic change.
    He started a romantic relationship with Jack Galen McKinley, and recruited him to work on conservative Republican Barry Goldwater's 1964 presidential campaign.
    More Details Hide Details Their relationship was troubled.
  • 1962
    Age 31
    In 1962 Milk became involved with Craig Rodwell, who was 10 years younger.
    More Details Hide Details Though Milk courted Rodwell ardently, waking him every morning with a call and sending him notes, Milk was uncomfortable with Rodwell's involvement with the New York Mattachine Society, a gay-rights organization. When Rodwell was arrested for walking in Riis Park, and charged with inciting a riot and with indecent exposure (the law required men's swimsuits to extend from above the navel to below the thigh), he spent three days in jail. The relationship soon ended as Milk became alarmed at Rodwell's tendency to agitate the police. Milk abruptly stopped working as an insurance actuary and became a researcher at the Wall Street firm Bache & Company. He was frequently promoted despite his tendency to offend the older members of the firm by ignoring their advice and flaunting his success. Although he was skilled at his job, co-workers sensed that Milk's heart was not in his work.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1956
    Age 25
    In 1956, he met Joe Campbell, at the Jacob Riis Park beach, a popular location for gay men in Queens.
    More Details Hide Details Campbell was seven years younger than Milk, and Milk pursued him passionately. Even after they moved in together, Milk wrote Campbell romantic notes and poems. Growing bored with their New York lives, they decided to move to Dallas, Texas, but they were unhappy there and moved back to New York, where Milk got a job as an actuarial statistician at an insurance firm. Campbell and Milk separated after almost six years; it would be his longest relationship. Milk tried to keep his early romantic life separate from his family and work. Once again bored and single in New York, he thought of moving to Miami to marry a lesbian friend to "have a front and each would not be in the way of the other". However, he decided to remain in New York, where he secretly pursued gay relationships.
  • 1955
    Age 24
    In 1955, he was discharged from the Navy at the rank of lieutenant, junior grade.
    More Details Hide Details Milk's early career was marked by frequent changes; in later years he would take delight in talking about his metamorphosis from a middle-class Jewish boy. He began teaching at George W. Hewlett High School on Long Island.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1947
    Age 16
    Milk graduated from Bay Shore High School in Bay Shore, New York, in 1947 and attended New York State College for Teachers in Albany (now the State University of New York at Albany) from 1947 to 1951, majoring in mathematics.
    More Details Hide Details He also wrote for the college newspaper. One classmate remembered, "He was never thought of as a possible queer—that's what you called them then—he was a man's man". After graduation, Milk joined the United States Navy during the Korean War. He served aboard the submarine rescue ship as a diving officer. He later transferred to Naval Station, San Diego to serve as a diving instructor.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1930
    Born
    Born on May 22, 1930.
    More Details Hide Details
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