Hedy Lamarr
Actress, inventor
Hedy Lamarr
Hedy Lamarr was an Austrian-born American actress, celebrated for her great beauty, who was a major contract star of MGM's "Golden Age". When she worked with Max Reinhardt in Berlin, he called her the "most beautiful woman in Europe" due to her "strikingly dark exotic looks", a sentiment widely shared by her audiences and critics.
Biography
Hedy Lamarr's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Hedy Lamarr
News
News abour Hedy Lamarr from around the web
Carmichael Artists Win Juror Awards in KVIE Art Auction - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Royal's silkscreen piece titled “Hedy” is an image of the actress Hedy Lamarr. Royal is an affiliate of Archival Framing and has been making art for 15 years. Ryan's watercolor titled “Still Life with Fruits and Flowers” is described as an exploration
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Jean Gabin on TCM: GRAND ILLUSION, PEPE LE MOKO, TOUCHEZ PAS AU GRISBI - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Those whose idea of cinema begins and ends in Hollywood will probably recognize that tale from a John Cromwell-directed 1938 Charles Boyer vehicle titled Algiers (1938), which also featured Hedy Lamarr in her first English-speaking role
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'Conan' more brawn than brains - Boston Herald
Google News - over 5 years
C+ When asked about seeing Cecil B. DeMille's 1949 biblical extravaganza “Samson and Delilah” with Victor Mature and Hedy LaMarr, Groucho Marx famously observed that Samson's “bosoms” were bigger than Delilah's. That is also true of leading man Jason
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Library Film Series Celebrates Glamorous Ladies From Hollywood's Golden Age - NJ TODAY
Google News - over 5 years
Featured in the program are the personalities and talents of Hedy Lamarr, Rita Hayworh, Veronica Lake, Elizabeth Taylor, and Marlene Dietrich. Each of these beauties had a unique screen presence which appealed to moviegoers throughout the world
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The new Jewess: A rising generation of actresses overturns old tropes - SanFranciscoSentinel.com
Google News - over 5 years
Actresses Mae West, whose mother was of Bavarian Jewish heritage, and Judy Holliday, whose parents were of Russian-Jewish decent, both fared well as comedians, but never as leading dramatic actresses, while Theda Bara, Alla Nazimova and Hedy Lamarr
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Claudette Colbert on TCM: BOOM TOWN, PARRISH, MIDNIGHT, OUTPOST IN MALAYA - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The box-office blockbuster Boom Town is a comedy-drama featuring four big names: Colbert, Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, and Hedy Lamarr. It's also mostly a dud, much like the previous (highly popular) Tracy-Gable pairing, Test Pilot (1938)
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Thursday Open Thread: Lamarr Edition - Big Government
Google News - over 5 years
Hedy Lamarr was (IMO) the most beautiful actress who ever graced the big screen. She was the consummate patriotic American and often served her country in the war effort. I read her biography "Ecstacy and Me" and was impressed by her talent and
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Story Notes for Blazing Saddles - AMCtv.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Actress Hedy Lamarr actually did sue because of the use of her name in the movie. According to Brooks, they settled out of court for a few thousand dollars and an apology. The credit for inventing the Candygram goes to Western Union
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Way back when: Today in history - Tulsa World
Google News - over 5 years
It featured five big-name actors - Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Claudette Colbert, Hedy Lamarr and Frank Morgan. Officers outnumbered hippies in the area around Turner Falls State Park where a rock festival that was expected to draw 30000 had been
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Ronald Colman Movie Schedule: LOST HORIZON, HER NIGHT OF ROMANCE, RAFFLES - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Ronald Colman, Jane Wyatt, Edward Everett Horton. BW-133 mins. 4:15 AM THE STORY OF MANKIND (1957) Satan and the spirit of mankind contend for the future of humanity. Dir: Irwin Allen. Cast: Ronald Colman, Hedy Lamarr, Groucho Marx. C-100 mins
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Hedy Lamarr Was Not Just Another Pretty Face - Investor's Business Daily
Google News - over 5 years
At his side was his Jewish-born bride, the actress who years later — as Hedy Lamarr (1913-2000) — would be called Hollywood's greatest beauty. With furs and jewels, Hedy was swathed in luxury. She also had to deal with Mandl, a domineering husband
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Artist to be featured at Prosser Art Walk - Mid Columbia Tri City Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Loder-DeLuca is the daughter of the late actress Hedy Lamarr, who has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Loder-DeLuca studied art at the University of Southern California and specializes in portraits of pop culture stars
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Winona Ryder highlights $11 billion shoplifting tsunami - NOLA.com
Google News - over 5 years
Then there are the celebrities -- Hedy Lamarr, Bess Myerson and, of course, Winona Ryder, who in December 2001 was nailed by security guards for trying to steal about $6000 of designer clothing from a Beverly Hills Saks Fifth Avenue
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DVD Extra: John Garfield at the Warner Archive, Part 2 - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Garfield was third-billed in this fairly lavish adaptation of John Steinbeck's story behind two of MGM's top stars, Spencer Tracy and Hedy Lamarr, but basically the film revolves around his character. Garfield plays Danny Alvarez, a Mexican-American
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Great Weekend Reads - Daily Beast
Google News - over 5 years
In 1966, Hedy Lamarr had launched the tradition of the celebrity shoplifter by swiping a $40 suit and several other items from a Los Angeles department store. The media tracked both scandals with gleeful interest. Life magazine ran a photo of Lamarr
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On This Day in History: June 30 'I Was a Sepia Hedy Lamarr' - Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Google News - over 5 years
Lena once said: “In my early days I was a sepia Hedy Lamarr. Now I'm black and a woman, singing my own way.” She later performed on the nightclub circuit and made hit LP and CD recordings. She was on Broadway in 1957 in Jamaica
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'The Steal' Probes the Psychology of Shoplifting - Chicagomag.com
Google News - over 5 years
From left: Hedy Lamarr, Bess Myerson, Mike Leake, Lindsay Lohan, and Winona Ryder A decade later, the videotapes remain just as compelling: A slight woman wanders through the floors of the Saks Fifth Avenue department store in Beverly Hills,
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Hollywood Auction Ends Myth of Zaftig Marilyn: Virginia Postrel - Bloomberg
Google News - over 5 years
Sharing a rotating mirrored platform with Hedy Lamarr's peacock gown from “Samson and Delilah” and Kim Novak's rhinestone- fringed show dress from “Jeanne Eagels,” Monroe's costume was displayed on a mannequin that had been carved down from a standard
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Hedy Lamarr
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2000
    Age 85
    Lamarr left James Loder out of her will and he sued for control of the US$3.3 million estate left by Lamarr in 2000.
    More Details Hide Details In the last decades of her life, the telephone became her only means of communication with the outside world, even with her children and close friends. She often talked up to six or seven hours a day on the phone, but she hardly spent any time with anyone in person in her final years. A documentary, Calling Hedy Lamarr, was released in 2004. Lamarr's children, Anthony Loder and Denise Loder-DeLuca, were featured in the documentary. In the 1974 Mel Brooks film Blazing Saddles, the character played by Harvey Korman was called "Hedley Lamarr." Her name is mentioned in the lyrics of the song "Feed Me (Git It!)" in the 1986 rock musical horror comedy film Little Shop of Horrors. The film is set in the 1960s and she is brought up as someone who would be a desirable date for the main character.
  • 1997
    Age 82
    For several years beginning in 1997, the boxes of CorelDRAW’s software suites were graced by a large Corel-drawn image of Lamarr.
    More Details Hide Details The picture won CorelDRAW’s yearly software suite cover design contest in 1996. Lamarr sued Corel for using the image without her permission. Corel countered that she did not own rights to the image. The parties reached an undisclosed settlement in 1998. For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Hedy Lamarr has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6247 Hollywood Blvd adjacent to Vine St where the Walk is centered. In her later years, Lamarr turned to plastic surgery to preserve the looks she was terrified of losing. Lamarr had to endure disastrous results. "She had her breasts enlarged, her cheeks raised, her lips made bigger, and much, much more" said her son, Anthony. "She had plastic surgery thinking it could revive her looks and her career, but it backfired and distorted her beauty". Anthony Loder also claimed that Lamarr was addicted to pills.
  • 1981
    Age 66
    With failing eyesight, she retreated from public life and settled in Miami Beach, Florida, in 1981.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1974
    Age 59
    In 1974, she filed an invasion of privacy lawsuit for US$10 million for an unauthorized use of her name (i.e. "Hedley Lamarr" in Mel Brooks' comedy film Blazing Saddles); the case was settled out of court.
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  • 1966
    Age 51
    Her autobiography, Ecstasy and Me, was published in 1966, however she said on TV that it was not actually written by her, implying that much of it was fictional.
    More Details Hide Details According to the book, while fleeing her husband, Fritz Mandl, she slipped into a brothel and hid in an empty room. While her husband searched the brothel, a man entered the room and she had sex with him so she could remain unrecognized. She escaped by hiring a maid who resembled her; she drugged the maid and used her uniform as a disguise to escape. Lamarr later sued the publisher, saying that many of the anecdotes in the book, which was described by a judge as "filthy, nauseating, and revolting," were fabricated by its ghost writer, Leo Guild. She was also sued in Federal Court by Gene Ringgold, who asserted the actress's autobiography contained material from an article about her life which he wrote in 1965 for a magazine called Screen Facts. The publication of her autobiography took place about a year after the accusations of shoplifting and a year after Andy Warhol's short film Hedy (1966). The shoplifting charges coincided with a failed attempt to return to the screen in Picture Mommy Dead (1966). The role was ultimately filled by Zsa Zsa Gabor.
    In 1966, she was arrested for shoplifting in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details The charges were eventually dropped. In 1991, she was arrested on the same charge in Florida, this time for stealing $21.48 worth of laxatives and eye drops. She pleaded "no contest" to avoid a court appearance, and in return for a promise to refrain from breaking any laws for a year, the charges were once again dropped.
  • 1965
    Age 50
    Following her sixth and final divorce in 1965, Hedy Lamarr remained single for the last 35 years of her life.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1953
    Age 38
    Lamarr became a naturalized citizen of the United States on 10 April 1953, at age 38.
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  • 1950
    Age 35
    She appeared only sporadically in films after 1950, one of her last roles being that of Joan of Arc in Irwin Allen's critically panned epic, The Story of Mankind (1957).
    More Details Hide Details White Cargo, one of Lamarr's biggest hits at MGM, contains, arguably, her most memorable film quote, delivered with provocative invitation: "I am Tondelayo. I make tiffin for you?" This line typifies many of Lamarr's roles, which emphasized her beauty and sexuality, while giving her relatively few lines. The lack of acting challenges bored Lamarr. She reportedly took up inventing to relieve her boredom. Lamarr's earliest inventions include an improved traffic stoplight and a tablet that would dissolve in water to create a carbonated drink. The beverage was unsuccessful; Lamarr herself said it tasted like Alka-Seltzer. With the ongoing World War, Lamarr was inspired to contribute to the war effort, designing a jam-proof radio guidance system for torpedoes. With the help of composer George Antheil, they drafted designs for a new frequency-hopping, spread-spectrum technology that they later patented.
  • 1945
    Age 30
    After leaving MGM in 1945, she enjoyed her biggest success as Delilah in Cecil B. DeMille's Samson and Delilah, the highest-grossing film of 1949, with Victor Mature as the Biblical strongman.
    More Details Hide Details However, following a comedic role opposite Bob Hope in My Favorite Spy (1951), her career went into decline.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1942
    Age 27
    Their invention was granted a patent on 11 August 1942 (filed using her married name Hedy Kiesler Markey). Yet, it was technologically difficult to implement, and the U.S. Navy was not receptive to considering inventions coming from outside the military at the time. Only in 1962, at the time of the Cuban missile crisis, did an updated version of their design appear on Navy ships.
    More Details Hide Details The design is one of the important elements behind today's spread-spectrum communication technology, such as GPS, CDMA, Wi-Fi networks and Bluetooth technology. They eventually received the Electronic Frontier Foundation Pioneer Award and the Bulbie Gnass Spirit of Achievement Bronze Award, given to individuals whose creative lifetime achievements in the arts, sciences, business, or invention fields have significantly contributed to society. Lamarr was also featured on the Science Channel and the Discovery Channel. In 2014, Lamarr and Antheil were posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Lamarr wanted to join the National Inventors Council, but was reportedly told by NIC member Charles F. Kettering and others that she could better help the war effort by using her celebrity status to sell War Bonds. Lamarr participated in a war bond selling campaign with a sailor named Eddie Rhodes. Rhodes would be in the crowd at each Lamarr appearance, and she would call him up on stage. She would briefly flirt with him before asking the audience if she should give him a kiss. The crowd would of course say yes, to which Hedy would reply that she would if enough people bought war bonds. After enough bonds were purchased, she would give Rhodes his kiss, and he would head back into the audience. Then they would head off to the next war bond rally.
  • 1941
    Age 26
    Lamarr was married and divorced six times. She adopted a son, James, in 1941, during her second marriage to Gene Markey.
    More Details Hide Details She went on to have two biological children, Denise (b. 1945) and Anthony (b. 1947), with her third husband, actor John Loder, who also adopted James. The following is a list of her marriages:
  • 1940
    Age 25
    Lamarr made 18 films from 1940 to 1949 and also had two children during that time (in 1945 and 1947).
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  • 1938
    Age 23
    He brought Hedy to Hollywood in 1938 and began promoting her as the "world's most beautiful woman."
    More Details Hide Details Lamarr's American film debut was in Algiers (1938), opposite Charles Boyer. The film created a "national sensation," says Shearer. She was billed as an unknown, but well-publicized Austrian actress, which created anticipation in audiences. Mayer hoped she would become another Greta Garbo or Marlene Dietrich. According to one viewer, when her face first appeared on the screen, "everyone gasped Lamarr's beauty literally took one's breath away." In future Hollywood films, she was invariably typecast as the archetypal, glamorous seductress of exotic origin. Lamarr played opposite the era's most popular leading men. Her many films include Boom Town (1940) with Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy, Comrade X with Gable, White Cargo (1942), Tortilla Flat (1942) with Tracy and John Garfield, H. M. Pulham, Esq. (1941) with Robert Young, and Dishonored Lady (1947). In 1941, Lamarr was cast alongside Lana Turner and Judy Garland in Ziegfeld Girl.
  • 1937
    Age 22
    After escaping her estranged husband, she fled to Paris in 1937, where she met Louis B. Mayer, who was scouting for talent in Europe.
    More Details Hide Details Mayer hired her. He persuaded her to change her name to Hedy Lamarr (she had been known as "the Ecstasy lady"), choosing the surname in homage to the beautiful silent film star, Barbara La Marr.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1933
    Age 18
    At age 18 on 10 August 1933, Lamarr married Friedrich Mandl, a wealthy (he was reputed to be the third richest man in Austria) and extremely jealous Austrian military arms merchant and munitions manufacturer.
    More Details Hide Details He strongly objected to her simulated orgasm scene in Ecstasy. In her autobiography Ecstasy and Me, Lamarr described Mandl as extremely controlling, preventing her from pursuing her acting career and keeping her a virtual prisoner, confined to their castle home, Schloss Schwarzenau. Mandl had close social and business ties to the fascist government of Italy, selling munitions to Mussolini; and, although he was half-Jewish, had ties to the Nazi government of Germany as well. Lamarr wrote that Mussolini and Hitler had attended lavish parties hosted at the Mandl home. He had her accompany him to business meetings, where he conferred with scientists and other professionals involved in military technology. These conferences were her introduction to the field of applied science and the ground that nurtured her latent talent in science. Lamarr's marriage to Mandl eventually became unbearable, and she decided to separate herself from both him and her country. She wrote in her autobiography that she disguised herself as her maid and fled to Paris. However, rumors claimed that Lamarr persuaded Mandl to let her wear all of her jewelry for a dinner, then disappeared.
    In early 1933, at age 18, she starred in Gustav Machatý's film, Ecstasy (Ekstase in German, Extase in Czech), which was filmed in Prague, Czechoslovakia.
    More Details Hide Details Lamarr’s role was that of a neglected young wife married to an indifferent older man. The film became notorious for showing Lamarr's face in the throes of orgasm as well as close-up and brief nude scenes in which she is seen swimming and running through the woods.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1914
    Born
    Lamarr was born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler in 1914 in Vienna, Austria-Hungary, the only child of Gertrud "Trude" Kiesler (née Lichtwitz; 3 February 1894 – 27 February 1977) and Emil Kiesler (27 December 1880 – 14 February 1935).
    More Details Hide Details Her father was born to a Jewish family in Lemberg (now Lviv in Ukraine) and was a successful bank director. Her mother was a pianist and Budapest native who came from an upper-class Jewish family; she had converted from Judaism to Catholicism and was a "practicing Christian". In later years, Hedy's influence as an actress would be used to help get her mother rescued from Austria, then under Nazi domination. In the late 1920s, Lamarr was discovered as an actress and brought to Berlin by producer Max Reinhardt. Following her training in the theater, she returned to Vienna, where she began to work in the film industry, first as a script girl, and soon as an actress.
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