Helen Forrest
Swing music vocalist
Helen Forrest
Helen Forrest was one of the most popular female vocalists during America's big band Swing Era. During her career, Forrest served as the "girl singer" for three of the most popular bands of the big band swing era, thus earning the reputation as "the voice of the name bands."
Biography
Helen Forrest's personal information overview.
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News
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Granny: our telly's off and on - The Gympie Times
Google News - over 5 years
Helen Forrest and grandchildren Ruby and Lucas Smith are sick of getting bad television reception or none at all at their Kandanga home. FRUSTRATING to say the least is the way Helen Forrest describes watching television these days
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Google News article
Der King of Swing: Zum 25. Todestag von Benny Goodman - Suite101.de
Google News - over 5 years
Helen Forrest, eine seiner Sängerinnen, erinnerte sich: "Es ist schwer, mit ihm zu arbeiten. Er merkt überhaupt nicht, dass man da ist." Kein Wunder, dass Gene Krupa oder Harry James sich absetzten, sobald sie bekannt genug geworden waren,
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Google News article
El clarinetista estadunidense nació el 30 de mayo de 1909 Permanece vigente ... - Impacto: El Diario
Google News - over 5 years
En 1943, con material grabado tiempo atrás ante la imposibilidad de grabar en esa época tras la entrada de Estados Unidos en la Guerra, Goodman consiguió dos grandes éxitos, uno de ellos con "Taking a chance on love", cantado por Helen Forrest
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Google News article
Janet F. Leonard - Staunton News Leader
Google News - almost 6 years
She was preceded in death by her husband, James B. Leonard; a son, William F. Leonard; her parents, Charles P. and Henrietta Starlin Forrest; and her siblings, Dr. David Forrest, Donald Forrest, Helen Forrest Stadlman and Ann Forrest Easton
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Google News article
Jazz singer Alex Pangman still recording after double lung transplant - Globe and Mail
Google News - almost 6 years
They introduced her to big-band singers such as Helen Forrest and Mildred Bailey, and to the joys of listening to old 78s. “I felt like I had just discovered a great dinosaur bone,” she says. “It was like a beautiful time capsule, that's also very real
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Google News article
Thinking Inside the Box (Musically, That Is)
NYTimes - over 7 years
THERE are numerous ways to invent history, as seen in this year's assortment of boxed sets. Some prefer the full-catalog purge, and others the rarities and remixes. Some celebrate received wisdom; others, alternate stories. And when all that's done, some start over, taking another look with fresh eyes. That there would be only one way to go about
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NYTimes article
ARTS | WESTCHESTER; The Swing Era Returns in a Tribute to a Bandleader
NYTimes - over 7 years
THE bandleader announced ''a lovely ballad from the World War II era,'' and the song ''Waiting for the Train to Come In'' emerged from the lips of a singer in a slinky black dress. The tune was a hit for the trumpet virtuoso and bandleader Harry James and the jazz singer Helen Forrest in the 1940s. It was a Wednesday night at Swing 46 in Manhattan,
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OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR; Radio Free America
NYTimes - over 7 years
WHEN I hear great American standards on the radio, I think of all the songwriters, artists and musicians whom my father, brother and I have worked with over the years. It reminds me that every recording has two parts, the composition and the performance. It also reminds me how many wonderful artists and musicians have not been paid fairly for their
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NYTimes article
Jailhouse Flock
NYTimes - almost 10 years
THE BIG GIRLS By Susanna Moore. 224 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. $24. The women-in-prison genre, even at its most blatantly exploitative, can't escape the political. The collective female experience, what we're allowed and what we're forbidden, is distilled into the image of rows of women behind bars doing time for crimes that often seem to be entangled in
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths DIAMOND, MILTON
NYTimes - over 10 years
DIAMOND--Milton. 88 of Lauderhill, FL, formerly of Long Island, NY, passed away September 15, 2006. Beloved father of Marsha Chenoff and Susan Joy Diamond. Grandfather of Jodi & Tracy. Brother of Helen Forrest & Rose Epstein. Father-in-law of Robert Chenoff. Beloved husband of the late Beatrice Diamond. He served in WWII and Korea and was a Lt. in
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NYTimes article
Queen of the Night
NYTimes - almost 11 years
FEVER The Life and Music of Miss Peggy Lee. By Peter Richmond. Illustrated. 449 pp. Henry Holt & Company. $30. To have experienced the sound and image of Peggy Lee in the 1950's and 60's was to be bewitched by the pop-jazz equivalent of a film noir femme fatale. Her soft, stealthy voice, always lingering behind the beat, hinted at secrets that
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths BENEROFE, ALVIN, D.D.S.
NYTimes - almost 14 years
BENEROFE - Alvin, D.D.S. Beloved husband of Bernice. Loving father of Barry and Michele Benerofe, Bruce and Barbara Benerofe, and Susan and Robert Silverman. Cherished grandfather of Sara and Melissa Benerofe. Dear brother of Helen Forrest. Services ''Boulevard-Riverside'', 1450 Broadway, Hewlett, L.I., 11:30 AM Friday.
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NYTimes article
Corrections
NYTimes - about 15 years
The obituary of Peggy Lee last Wednesday misidentified the band joined by another singer, Helen Forrest, when she was succeeded by Ms. Lee in Benny Goodman's group. Ms. Forrest left to sing with Harry James, not Artie Shaw.
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NYTimes article
Peggy Lee Dies
NYTimes - about 15 years
Correction: January 30, 2002, Wednesday The obituary of Peggy Lee last Wednesday misidentified the band joined by another singer, Helen Forrest, when she was succeeded by Ms. Lee in Benny Goodman's group. Ms. Forrest left to sing with Harry James, not Artie Shaw.
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NYTimes article
MUSIC; Not Much in Common Except Beautiful Music
NYTimes - over 15 years
THE world of jazz has seen its share of unlikely partnerships, both professional and personal. Rarely, though, has there been one quite so improbable as the brief collaboration between Billie Holiday and Artie Shaw, who worked together for eight eventful months in 1938. Holiday and Mr. Shaw were both prickly, unpredictable and sexually adventurous,
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NYTimes article
MUSIC; A Female Singer In Holiday's Class And in Her Shadow
NYTimes - over 15 years
MILDRED BAILEY, a nearly forgotten singer whose recordings from the late 1920's to the early 1940's have been collected in a new 10-CD boxed set, was once such a favorite of those in the know that she finished a close second to Billie Holiday in a 1944 Esquire magazine poll of 16 authorities on jazz, and beat her for first place in 1945 and '46.
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NYTimes article
MUSIC; A Jazz Icon Who Spent Half a Life in Jazz
NYTimes - almost 17 years
H. L. MENCKEN once suggested that in a well-run universe, everybody would have two lives: ''one for observing and studying the world, and the other for formulating and setting down his conclusions about it.'' This is more or less the way the clarinetist Artie Shaw, who turns 90 on Tuesday, has contrived to arrange things. In the first half of his
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NYTimes article
MUSIC; Easy to Like and, Finally, Hard to Forget
NYTimes - almost 17 years
IN jazz as in the other arts, worldly success can be a decidedly mixed blessing. As the critic Max Harrison has pointed out, ''People do not object to artists deserving success -- only to their getting it.'' The bigger the triumph, the snarkier the reaction, at least among those who mistakenly believe there is an inverse relationship between
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NYTimes article
Helen Forrest, Singer During the Big Band Era, Dies at 82
NYTimes - over 17 years
Helen Forrest, the big-band singer whose dreamy hits with the Harry James orchestra distilled the nostalgic spirit of World War II pop, died on Sunday at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Los Angeles. She was 82. The cause was congestive heart failure, The Associated Press reported. Known as ''the voice of the name bands,'' Ms.
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Helen Forrest
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1999
    Age 81
    Helen Forrest died on July 11, 1999 from congestive heart failure at the Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details She was 82. Her final resting place is in Mount Sinai Memorial Park in Los Angeles.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1944
    Age 26
    Forrest acted in several musical films, including Bathing Beauty and Two Girls and a Sailor, which were both released in 1944.
    More Details Hide Details Despite an unhappy childhood, frequent illness, and personal disappointments, Forrest remained dedicated to her musical profession until the early 1990s. Forrest married and divorced three times, and had one son, Michael Forrest Feinman, who currently resides in Lancaster, California.
    In 1944, she made an appearance in the Esther Williams movie Bathing Beauty with Harry James and his orchestra.
    More Details Hide Details After a dip in recording in the 1950s, including a stint with the startup Bell Records, Forrest sang with Tommy Dorsey's orchestra, led by Sam Donahue in the early 1960s. She continued to sing in supper clubs in the 1970s and 1980s. Her final album was released in 1983. She kept singing until the early 1990s when rheumatoid arthritis began to affect her vocal cords and forced her into retirement. Over the course of her career, she recorded more than 500 songs.
    From 1944 to 1947, she sang on Dick Haymes' radio show.
    More Details Hide Details It was with Haymes that she recorded the song, "Some Sunday Morning."
  • 1943
    Age 25
    Forrest left Harry James in late 1943 in pursuit of a solo career.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1942
    Age 24
    Because of her involvement with three of the most popular bands of the big band swing era, Forrest was known as "the voice of the name bands." In 1942, Helen Forrest was voted the top female performer in the nation.
    More Details Hide Details
    It was with the Harry James Orchestra that she recorded what are arguably her most popular numbers, including "I Had the Craziest Dream" in 1942 and "I Don't Want to Walk Without You."
    More Details Hide Details Forrest also dated James, until he met the woman he would later marry, Betty Grable.
  • 1941
    Age 23
    In 1941, Forrest was hired by Harry James.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1940
    Age 22
    She recorded with Nat King Cole and Lionel Hampton in 1940.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1939
    Age 21
    In late 1939, Forrest left Shaw and joined Benny Goodman, with whom she recorded a number of celebrated songs, including the hit song "The Man I Love."
    More Details Hide Details She told the Pop Chronicles radio series: "Benny would look right above your eyebrows, in the middle, right on top of the brow. He was a very strange man."
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1917
    Born
    She was born Helen Fogel to a Jewish family in Atlantic City, New Jersey on April 12, 1917.
    More Details Hide Details After singing for WNEW and WCBS in New York, Helen began singing at the Washington Madrillon Club, in Washington, D.C. After seeing Forrest in Washington, D.C., bandleader Artie Shaw asked Helen to go on tour with him. Shaw was looking for new talent when vocalist Billie Holiday had to leave the band after singing with the group for a short period of time. Helen was hired in 1938. She recorded 38 singles with Shaw's band. Two of her biggest hits with Shaw were the songs "They Say" and "All the Things You Are."
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