Henry Wilcoxon
Actor
Henry Wilcoxon
Henry Wilcoxon was an actor born in Roseau, Dominica, British West Indies, and best known as a leading man in many of Cecil B. DeMille's films, also serving as DeMille's associate producer on his later films.
Biography
Henry Wilcoxon's personal information overview.
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News
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Politi on The Barclays: Hurricane Irene could dampen this tournament with 'the ... - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com
Google News - over 5 years
Henry Wilcoxon had roles in some of the most celebrated films in the 20th Century, including “The Ten Commandments” and “The Greatest Show On Earth.” But when his daughter, Wendy Stevens, walks into the clubhouse at her country club,
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10 Best Movies With Greek Subtitles - Screen Junkies
Google News - over 5 years
Directed by Cecil B. DeMille, the Oscar-nominated American classic features the acting talents of Loretta Young, Henry Wilcoxon, and Ian Keith. “A Night At The Opera.” Even some Marx Brothers comedies come with Greek subtitles
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The Greatest Hollywood Director You May Never Have Heard Of - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Though his point is now moot, "Miniver" does lavish us with glorious set pieces, like Garson's kitchen confrontation with a downed German paratrooper, and Henry Wilcoxon's patriotic speech from a church pulpit, all of it is gorgeously photographed by
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Alma-Tadema stuns with records for Moses and Cleopatra - Art Newspaper
Google News - almost 6 years
The auction house cleverly illustrated the latter at the pre-sale exhibition, where Alma-Tadema vied for visitor attention with Claudette Colbert and Henry Wilcoxon, with a continuous screening of Cecil B. DeMille's Cleopatra (1934)
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Correction
NYTimes - almost 8 years
A picture caption on May 17 with an article about Angela Lansbury misidentified an actor shown with her in ''Samson and Delilah'' (1949), and a correction in this space last Sunday misstated the given name of the other actor in the photo. The actor shown with Ms. Lansbury is William Farnum, who portrayed Tubal -- not Henry Wilcoxon, who played
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CORRECTION
NYTimes - almost 8 years
A picture caption May 15 with an article about Angela Lansbury, using information from a publicist, misidentified the actor shown with her and Vincent Mature in ''Samson and Delilah'' (1949). He was William Farnum, who portrayed Tubal, not Henry Wilcoxon, who played Ahtur in the film. An article May 20 about a vow by Karl W. Eikenberry, the new
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Corrections
NYTimes - almost 8 years
A picture caption on May 17 with an article about Angela Lansbury, using information from a publicist, misidentified the actor shown with her and Vincent Mature in ''Samson and Delilah'' (1949). He was William Farnum, who portrayed Tubal -- not Henry Wilcoxon, who played Ahtur in the film.
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NYTimes article
Her Magic Act: Transforming Herself Nightly
NYTimes - almost 8 years
Correction Appended ''BLITHE SPIRIT'' is a piece of fluff built around some titanium clockwork that Noël Coward soldered together over just a few days in 1941, when he thought London needed cheering up. Without knowing it he had begun to invent the sitcom. The mainspring of the mechanism, and the key to its success, is the part of Madame Arcati,
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Critic's Choice: New DVD's
NYTimes - almost 11 years
The Cecil B. DeMille Collection Film directors frequently received top billing in silent movies, and it wasn't until the factory system imposed by Irving Thalberg and others succeeded in diminishing the independence of the director that their names dropped below the title. Among the few exceptions to that rule in the 1930's and 40's were Frank
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SPOTLIGHT; Keeping the Faith
NYTimes - over 18 years
The opening of THE CRUSADES (1935), a Cecil B. DeMille spectacular, is a terrific scene of two mighty armies slamming together. This is one DeMille lolla-palooza that really moves. There's no waiting around for the next commandment - from that fade-in to the climax, a barbarian walled city is unders siege by the Christmas. And tucked away within
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - almost 20 years
A sensible adaptation of a Ernest Hemingway milestone, a fine DeMille epic, a sophisticated bauble and a suspenseful romantic melodrama brighten the week's movie offerings. The sights, sounds and color of a bullfight-arena city deliver most of the impact in THE SUN ALSO RISES (1957). But this adaptation of the Hemingway novel of rootless
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SPOTLIGHT;On the Road Again
NYTimes - almost 21 years
A shipboard seduction in Cecil B. DeMille's CLEOPATRA (1934) takes the cake for adroit showmanship, when the enticing Queen of Egypt (Claudette Colbert, above) drolly welcomes her virile Roman conqueror Marc Antony (Henry Wilcoxon) aboard her river barge. So does the rest of this lavish probe of the past from a Hollywood master. Perfectly cast,
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - about 21 years
FOUR women prove the importance of good casting on the television film roster this week. Claudette Colbert burnishes Cecil B. DeMille's CLEOPATRA (1934) like an Egyptian sunrise. The spectacle master's history is compact, brisk and suggestive. It's also juicier than the Taylor-Burton juggernaut. One sequence takes the cake: a Nile barge seduction,
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 21 years
A humdinger mystery, a picaresque comedy, a Freudian western and a ripe, thumping DeMille spectacle head up a colorful mix on the film roster this week. A huge close-up of a killer's eye (peering from a closet) in Robert Siodmak's brilliantly directed SPIRAL STAIRCASE (1946) will freeze your gills. Watch for the stunned surprise of Dorothy McGuire
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Home Video
NYTimes - almost 22 years
This fall, makers of video games will step up the action. As 16-bit games begin to fade, more powerful 32-bit games will take their place. And beyond 32-bit lies 64-bit. "You have to keep raising the bar," said Howard Lincoln, the chairman of Nintendo of America. "You've got to give players more. The next game has to be better than the last." The
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NYTimes article
HOME VIDEO; 'Beware the Ides of March'
NYTimes - about 29 years
LEAD: CLEOPATRA Directed by Cecil B. DeMille. With Claudette Colbert (in photo), Warren William (in photo) and Henry Wilcoxon. Goodtimes Home Video. 100 minutes. $9.95. CLEOPATRA Directed by Cecil B. DeMille. With Claudette Colbert (in photo), Warren William (in photo) and Henry Wilcoxon. Goodtimes Home Video. 100 minutes. $9.95. Take a dab of
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NYTimes article
Heather Angel, 77, Is Dead; Acted in More Than 60 Films
NYTimes - over 30 years
Heather Angel, an actress whose 50-year stage and screen career included the role of a suicidal mother in the Alfred Hitchcock movie ''Lifeboat,'' died Saturday at her home here. She was 77 years old. Miss Angel appeared in more than 60 films, mainly in supporting roles. In ''Lifeboat,'' she was a woman who throws herself overboard after her baby
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NYTimes article
TV WEEKEND; An Effort to Understand Cecil B. De Mille
NYTimes - over 32 years
One of the most alluring and dangerous subjects for documentary biography is the Hollywood producer, director or actor. Unlike many other subjects, these people leave behind a body of work that is ideally suited for the purposes of the biographer: film itself. In the presence of such abundance, many a biographer turns lazy and many a documentary
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IN SHORT
NYTimes - almost 33 years
FICTION THE SUPERINTENDENT. By Blair T. Bumelin. (Schocken $17.95.) The author of this promising first novel plunges us right into the middle of serveral suburban school intrigues. Lee Jacobi, a married principal, is involved with a young, pot-smoking first-grade teacher; Jacobi is also desperately envious of Donald Kone, the new school
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NYTimes article
FILM VIEW; FOR DE MILLE, MOSES' EGYPT WAS REALLY AMERICA
NYTimes - about 33 years
This has been a week for catching up - with ''Splash,'' the mermaid comedy that's fast becoming one of the biggest live-action hits in the history of the Walt Disney empire, with ''Seeing Red,'' the Oscar-nominated documentary by Julia Reichert and James Klein, and with the formidable shade of the late Cecil B. De Mille, specifically with his 1956
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Henry Wilcoxon
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1984
    Age 78
    Died on March 6, 1984.
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  • 1980
    Age 74
    In the last two decades of his life, he worked sporadically and accepted minor acting roles in a number of television and film productions. He guest-starred in shows including Daniel Boone, Perry Mason, I Spy, It Takes a Thief, Wild Wild West, Gunsmoke, Cimarron Strip, Cagney & Lacey, The Big Valley, Private Benjamin and Marcus Welby, M. D., as well as in a smaller number of films, including a memorable turn as the golf-obsessed Bishop Pickering in the 1980 comedy Caddyshack.
    More Details Hide Details He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6256 Hollywood Blvd. west of Argyle St., in front of the W Hollywood Hotel & Residences and the Metro Red Line Hollywood/Vine station, and across from the Pantages Theater. By loaning money from his early film acting, Wilcoxon assisted his brother Owen to establish himself in 1931 as a partner in the Vale Motor Company in London, and for a short time he showed a personal interest in the development of their sports car, the Vale Special. English-born actress Heather Angel, whom he had previously acted with in Self Made Lady (1932) when they were both in England, had come out to Hollywood a few months before Wilcoxon and met him again in 1934. They became lifetime friends. She taught him horse-riding, and acted in two more films with him: The Last of the Mohicans (1936) and Lady Hamilton (1941). Heather Angel and her husband Ralph Forbes were both present at Wilcoxon's wedding to Sheila Browning.
  • 1975
    Age 69
    At his home in Burbank in the summer of 1975 Wilcoxon first met his niece Valerie (born 1933), the English daughter of his brother Owen with Dorothy Drew (sister of architect Jane Drew).
    More Details Hide Details Up until then he did not know that his brother, killed at the Dunkirk evacuation, had any children. In The Devil Thumbs a Ride and Other Movies (New York: Grove Press, 1988), author Barry Gifford, citing personal experience of an attempted pickup by the actor, suggests that Wilcoxon was bisexual. Made in UK: Made in USA:
  • FIFTIES
  • 1958
    Age 52
    Wilcoxon was sole producer on the 1958 film The Buccaneer, a remake of DeMille's 1938 effort, which DeMille only "supervised" (due to his declining health) while Anthony Quinn directed.
    More Details Hide Details After DeMille died, Wilcoxon did "considerable work... in pre-production" on "a film based on the life of Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scout movement," which DeMille had left unrealized, and was also ultimately abandoned. After a relatively inactive period "for the next three or four years," Wilcoxon had a "chance meeting with actor Charlton Heston and director Franklin Schaffner at Universal studios," a meeting which saw him appear in The War Lord (1965), for which he again "went on tour... visiting 21 cities to publicize the picture." He was credited as co-producer on a "90-minute tribute to Cecil B. DeMille televised by NBC" entitled The World's Greatest Showman: The Legend of Cecil B. DeMille (1963), which production was hampered by the absence of "some of DeMille's best-remembered films of the 30s and 40s" when rights-holder MCA refused their use. At the opening of the DeMille Theatre in New York, he produced a "two-reel short," that in the estimation of critic Don Miller "was much better than this 90-minute tribute."
  • FORTIES
  • 1952
    Age 46
    Wilcoxon played a "small but important part" in DeMille's 1952 production The Greatest Show on Earth, on which film he also served as Associate Producer, helping steer the film towards its Academy Award for Best Picture, 1952.
    More Details Hide Details He also acted as associate producer on, and acted (as Pentaur, the pharaoh's captain of the guards) in DeMille's remake of his own The Ten Commandments (1956).
  • 1951
    Age 45
    In the late 1940s, "several young actors and actresses came to Wilcoxon and wife Joan Woodbury and asked them to form a play-reading group", which began to take shape as the 'Wilcoxon Players' in 1951, when the two "transformed their living room into a stage." 'Guest star' performers sometimes appeared in the plays produced by the group, among them Larry Parks and Corinne Calvet, and soon the "Wilcoxon Group Players Annual Nativity Play" was being performed "at the Miles Playhouse in Santa Monica."
    More Details Hide Details The group was recognized by the American Cancer Society in 1956 with a Citation of Merit, awarded for donations received by attendees of the groups Easter productions.
  • 1949
    Age 43
    Upon his return from war service, Wilcoxon "picked up his relationship with Cecil B. DeMille" with Unconquered, and after starring as Sir Lancelot in the 1949 musical version of Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (with Bing Crosby in the title role), he featured (with "fifth starring billing") in DeMille's Samson and Delilah (1949).
    More Details Hide Details To help pre-sell the film, "DeMille arranged for Wilcoxon to tour the country giving a series of lectures on the film and its research in 41 key cities in the United States and Canada." However, "after the fourteenth city," Wilcoxon collapsed "from a mild bout of pneumonia," (actually tuberculosis), and the tour was continued by "press-agent Richard Condon and Ringling Brothers public relations man Frank Braden" (who also collapsed, in Minneapolis). Condon finished touring by the time of the film's release in October, 1949. Wilcoxon, meanwhile, had returned to England under contract to feature in The Miniver Story (1950), a sequel to the multi-Oscar-winning Mrs. Miniver (1942) in which he reprised his role as the vicar.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1942
    Age 36
    During his period of service, he had three films released in 1942, among them Mrs. Miniver, which received considerable public acclaim, as well as six Academy Awards.
    More Details Hide Details Wilcoxon, in his role as the vicar, "wrote and re-wrote" the key sermon with director William Wyler "the night before the sequence was to be shot." The speech "made such an impact that it was used in essence by President Roosevelt as a morale builder and part of it was the basis for leaflets printed in various languages and dropped over enemy and occupied territory."
  • 1941
    Age 35
    When America entered the World War II in December 1941, Wilcoxon enlisted in the United States Coast Guard, supposedly "leaving his home twenty minutes after the announcement that the States had declared war and proceeding to enlist then and there."
    More Details Hide Details He served with the Coast Guard until 1946, gaining the rank of Lieutenant.
    In 1941, Wilcoxon appeared as Captain Hardy, alongside Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh, in Alexander Korda's Lady Hamilton, during the filming of which:
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  • 1938
    Age 32
    On 17 December 1938 (her 23rd birthday) he married his second wife, actress Joan Woodbury. They had three daughters: Wendy Joan Wilcoxon (born 1939), Heather Ann Wilcoxon (1947) and Cecilia Dawn "CiCi" Wilcoxon (1950). They divorced in 1969.
    More Details Hide Details His second daughter was named after Heather Angel. His youngest daughter was named after Cecil B. DeMille: DeMille said he wanted the child to be called Cecil if it was a boy, but when it turned out to be a girl, DeMille was still insistent, saying "I think Cecilia is a beautiful name! My daughter is named Cecilia ". Wilcoxon was an amateur painter and photographer, whose work was exhibited on at least one occasion in London. He was also "an avid antique collector and accomplished flier."
  • 1936
    Age 30
    Wilcoxon married a 19-year old actress Sheila Browning in the summer of 1936, but they divorced a year later.
    More Details Hide Details When they had first met, two years before they were married, they were introduced by her sister Lynn, and Browning told Wilcoxon her name was "Bonnie". When they got to know each other better it was at his suggestion that she changed her name to Sheila Garrett.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1934
    Age 28
    Altogether he made eight films in Britain prior to 1934.
    More Details Hide Details Also in 1933, "while acting on stage in Eight Bells, a talent scout for Paramount Pictures reportedly arranged a screen test which came to the attention of producer-director Cecil B. DeMille in Hollywood." DeMille recalls in his autobiography: So he was renamed by DeMille for the role of Marc Antony in Cleopatra, and from then on he was Henry Wilcoxon. Wilcoxon he was next given the lead role of Richard the Lion-Hearted in DeMille's big-budget film The Crusades (1935) opposite Loretta Young. That film, however, was a financial failure, "losing more than $700,000". Wilcoxon himself deemed "his worst acting job be in Mysterious Mr. Moto (1938), in which year he played in If I Were King and featured in Five of a Kind with the Dionne quintuplets.
  • 1932
    Age 26
    In 1932, he appeared in a remake of the 1929 film The Flying Squad (based on the novel by Edgar Wallace), reprising the role originated by future-Hitchcock regular John Longden.
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  • 1931
    Age 25
    In 1931, Wilcoxon made his screen debut appearing as "Larry Tindale" in The Perfect Lady, swiftly followed by a role opposite Heather Angel in Self Made Lady, alongside Louis Hayward and others.
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  • 1929
    Age 23
    Wilcoxon's first stage performance "was in the E.M. Dell play The 100th Chance," before he joined the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in 1929 and (as Harry Wilcoxon) toured "for several years" playing "all roles that came his way."
    More Details Hide Details Among these roles, he found critical success playing Captain Cook in a production of Rudolph Besier's The Barretts of Wimpole Street at the London Queen's Theatre alongside Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies, Scott Sunderland and Cedric Hardwicke. In June 1932, at the Queen's Theatre, he played Donald Gage alongside Edith Evans as Irela in Sir Barry Jackson's production of Beverley Nichols' novel Evensong.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1905
    Born
    Henry Wilcoxon was born Harry Frederick Wilcoxon on 8 September 1905 in Roseau, Dominica.
    More Details Hide Details His father was Robert Stanley Wilcoxon (known as "Tan"), manager of the Colonial Bank in Jamaica, and his mother, Lurleene Minuette Núñez de Córdoba, had been an amateur theatre actress. The following is a summary of the early childhood of Henry (Harry) and his brother Robert Owen Wilcoxon (Owen), from his autobiography. Harry and Owen were known as 'Biff' and 'Bang' to friends and family due to fighting skills gained in amateur boxing. After completing his education, Wilcoxon was employed by Joseph Rank, the father of J. Arthur Rank, before working for Bond Street tailors Pope and Bradshaw. While working for the tailors, Wilcoxon applied for a visa to work as a chauffeur in the United States, but upon seeing his application refused, turned to boxing and then to acting.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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