Herman Talmadge
American politician
Herman Talmadge
Herman Eugene Talmadge, Sr., was an American politician from the state of Georgia. He served as the 70th Governor of Georgia briefly in 1947 and again from 1948 to 1955. His term was marked by his segregationist policies. After leaving office Talmadge was elected to the U.S. Senate, serving from 1957 until 1981.
Biography
Herman Talmadge's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Herman Talmadge
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Herman Talmadge
News
News abour Herman Talmadge from around the web
How would lake visionaries respond today? - Gainesville Times
Google News - over 5 years
Herman Talmadge presided over the ceremonial groundbreaking of Buford Dam and the creation of Lake Lanier. If asked today, 'Has Lake Lanier met your expectations?' how would they respond? "As a multipurpose project, Lake Lanier was authorized by
Article Link:
Google News article
Paving square got anti-tax opposition, too - Gainesville Times
Google News - over 5 years
During her lifetime, she fought Georgia Power Co. for building dams on the Tallulah River, ran for governor against Herman Talmadge and became the first woman to serve as state librarian. Her husband had died in 1904. Johnny Vardeman is retired editor
Article Link:
Google News article
John Couric, Katie Couric's Father, Dies At 90 - Huffington Post
Google News - over 5 years
Herman Talmadge of Georgia and a hurricane that in 1949 devastated the east coast of Florida. He joined the news service's Washington bureau in 1951 and subsequently wrote about then-Senate Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson's heart attack,
Article Link:
Google News article
Desegregating Cobb - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Herman Talmadge stated that any school district attempting to desegregate voluntarily would immediately lose all state funding. But support for the amendment was not as unified as one might have expected given the racial climate of the time
Article Link:
Google News article
Using Legacy of Watergate, John Dean to Teach Ethics - Ocala
Google News - over 5 years
Senator Herman Talmadge asked about an odd feature of the list: asterisks. Why, the Georgia senator asked, had the former White House counsel placed an asterisk by more than two-thirds of the names? Because, Mr. Dean replied, each was a lawyer
Article Link:
Google News article
Rebecca Johnston: Slower good ol' days in Cherokee had air conditioning - Cherokee Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
Herman Talmadge would pontificate, and there would be games like the greasy pole climb, and even a hog calling contest. Pie eating, egg tossing and sack races provided seemingly unsophisticated fun. Often the day would end with a street square dance
Article Link:
Google News article
May 23, 1949: Governor Speaks at Local Graduation - Patch.com
Google News - almost 6 years
The governor of Georgia was set to address the senior class of Braselton High School on May 23, 1949. Herman Talmadge was to be in attendance when 16 students received diplomas. Interested in a follow-up to this article? Great, we'll send you an email
Article Link:
Google News article
'Splendor' in the Past: Billy Winn pens 600-page history of St. Luke UMC - Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
Google News - almost 6 years
It sent the resolution to Georgia senators Richard B. Russell and Herman Talmadge. The next year, in the spring of '63, the US Department of Health, Education and Welfare sent a letter to Muscogee County instructing that “segregated schools are not
Article Link:
Google News article
Billy Graham's first visit to Atlanta - Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
“ Introduced at the Sunday night sermon by Graham were “Gov. and Mrs. [Herman] Talmadge, Lt. Gov. Marvin Griffin and Mayor [William B.] Hartsfield.” The “magic eyes of WSB-TV . . . took the service into an unknown number of homes, ” wrote Constitution
Article Link:
Google News article
Yarbrough: One death welcomed, another one mourned - Gainesville Times
Google News - almost 6 years
He was a former Republican state legislator who ran against incumbent Democrat Herman Talmadge for the US Senate in 1968, when there were more wombats in Georgia than Republicans. He got only 22 percent of the vote but he paved the way for a true
Article Link:
Google News article
Edward Boyd, 92, Marketer to Blacks, Dies
NYTimes - almost 10 years
Edward F. Boyd, who as a young sales executive parlayed his assignment to promote Pepsi-Cola to fellow blacks into a war against white racism and black stereotypes, meanwhile selling oceans more soda, died on April 30 in Los Angeles, PepsiCo announced. He was 92. Pepsi hired Mr. Boyd in 1947 -- the same year the Brooklyn Dodgers introduced Jackie
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Betty Talmadge, Ex-Wife of Georgia Senator, Dies at 81
NYTimes - almost 12 years
Betty Talmadge, a former first lady of Georgia and a prominent Washington hostess who had a second career as a businesswoman, restaurateur and cookbook author after her divorce from Senator Herman E. Talmadge, died on Saturday in Atlanta. She was 81. Mrs. Talmadge died after a long illness, her son, Gene, said. Mrs. Talmadge was married to Mr.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Tillie Fowler, 62, a Former House Leader
NYTimes - almost 12 years
Former Representative Tillie Fowler, who despite being the most powerful woman in Congress did not run for re-election in 2000 to keep a promise to serve only four terms, died yesterday in Jacksonville, Fla. She was 62. She had suffered a brain hemorrhage two days earlier, a family spokesman, Tom Alexander, told The Associated Press. Ms. Fowler was
Article Link:
NYTimes article
S.E. Vandiver, 86, Georgia Governor, Dies
NYTimes - about 12 years
Former Gov. S. Ernest Vandiver, who won office vowing that ''no, not one'' black child would enter a white classroom in Georgia but went on to preside over peaceful desegregation, died on Monday at his home in Lavonia, Ga. He was 86. His death was announced by his family through the office of Gov. Sonny Perdue. Governor from 1959 to 1963, Mr.
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Maynard H. Jackson Jr., First Black Mayor of Atlanta and a Political Force, Dies at 65
NYTimes - over 13 years
Maynard H. Jackson Jr., who as this city's first black mayor embodied the seismic shift in political power from Atlanta's white establishment to its growing black middle class, died this morning after collapsing at an airport in Washington. He was 65. He was resuscitated at Reagan National Airport but suffered a heart attack en route to Virginia
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Herman Talmadge, Georgia Senator and Governor, Dies at 88
NYTimes - almost 15 years
Former Senator Herman E. Talmadge, an old-fashioned Southern populist who built schools as governor of Georgia and then called for stopping desegregation by closing them, died today at his Hampton, Ga., home. He was 88. Mr. Talmadge, a Democrat who was elected governor twice, lost his bid for a fifth term in the Senate in 1980 when he could not
Article Link:
NYTimes article
CONTESTING THE VOTE: THE CONTEXT; Pick an Arbiter: Courts, Politicians or the Public
NYTimes - about 16 years
''Confusion,'' said Macduff when he discovered the body of the murdered King Duncan, ''now hath made his masterpiece.'' The Florida Supreme Court has made another with its order today that thousands of ballots in Miami-Dade County be manually recounted, along with thousands in other counties where no manual recount has taken place. It is by no
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Herman Talmadge
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2002
    Age 88
    Died on March 21, 2002.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1980
    Age 66
    In 1980 Talmadge and his wife divorced.
    More Details Hide Details That year he had a tough primary challenge from Democrat Zell Miller. Talmadge defeated Miller but lost the general election to Republican Mack Mattingly, marking the end of his family's political dynasty and the start of the rise of the Republican Party in Georgia. Mattingly was the first Republican to represent Georgia in the Senate since Reconstruction and was a white conservative. After his defeat, Talmadge retired to his home. He lived for more than two decades, dying at the age of 88. Talmadge and his wife had had two sons together, Herman E. Talmadge, Jr., and Robert Shingler Talmadge.
  • 1979
    Age 65
    Talmadge became embroiled in a financial scandal. After an extensive investigation by the Senate, on October 11, 1979, Talmadge was censured by an 81–15 vote of the U.S. Senate for "improper financial conduct" between 1973 and 1978.
    More Details Hide Details He was found to have accepted reimbursements of $43,435.83 for official expenses not incurred, and to have improperly reported the "expenses" as campaign expenditures.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1968
    Age 54
    In 1968, Talmadge faced the first of his three Republican challengers for his Senate seat.
    More Details Hide Details E. Earl Patton (1927-2011), later a member of the Georgia State Senate, received 256,796 votes (22.5 percent) to Talmadge's 885,103 (77.3 percent). Patton, a real estate developer, was the first Republican in Georgia to run for the U.S. Senate since the Reconstruction era, when most Republicans had been African-American freedmen. He was a sign of the shifting white electorate in the South, where white conservatives moved into the Republican Party. Talmadge ran a disciplined office, requiring his staff to respond to every constituent letter within 24 hours of receipt.
  • 1964
    Age 50
    After President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Talmadge, along with more than a dozen other southern Senators, boycotted the 1964 Democratic National Convention.
    More Details Hide Details With the help of Senator Richard Russell, Talmadge had gained appointment to the Agriculture Committee during his first year in Washington and to the Senate Finance Committee shortly thereafter. Given his successive re-elections from the one-party state of Georgia, Talmadge gained the chairmanship of the powerful Senate Agriculture Committee by seniority. He sponsored bills to help farmers, an important constituency.
  • FORTIES
  • 1956
    Age 42
    Talmadge was elected to the United States Senate in 1956.
    More Details Hide Details Most blacks in Georgia were still disenfranchised under state laws passed by conservative white Democrats and discriminatory practices they had conducted since the turn of the 20th century. During his time as U.S. Senator, Talmadge continued as a foe of civil rights legislation, even as the African American Civil Rights Movement gained media coverage and increasing support across the country.
    After leaving office, Talmadge was elected in 1956 to the U.S. Senate, serving eight terms from 1957 until 1981.
    More Details Hide Details He gained considerable power over the decades. He gained chairmanship by seniority of the powerful Senate Agriculture Committee. After being censured by the Senate in 1979 for financial irregularities, Talmadge lost the 1980 general election to Republican Mack Mattingly, part of the shift of white conservatives in the South to the Republican Party. It was a reversal of party affiliation from the 19th century.
  • 1954
    Age 40
    Talmadge was barred by law from seeking another full term as Governor in 1954.
    More Details Hide Details That year the United States Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that segregated public schools were unconstitutional, and advised school systems to integrate.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1950
    Age 36
    Two years later, Talmadge was elected to a full term in the 1950 election.
    More Details Hide Details During his terms, Talmadge attracted new industries to Georgia. He remained a staunch supporter of racial segregation, even as the Civil Rights Movement gained momentum in the postwar years. Many African-American veterans began to seek social justice.
  • 1948
    Age 34
    Talmadge soon yielded to the state supreme court ruling. He prepared to run for the special gubernatorial election in 1948, and defeated incumbent Governor Thompson.
    More Details Hide Details
    Talmadge was elected as governor in a special election in 1948, and elected again to a full term in 1950, serving into 1955.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1946
    Age 32
    In December 1946, the elder Talmadge died before taking office.
    More Details Hide Details Melvin E. Thompson, the lieutenant governor-elect; Ellis Arnall, the prior governor; and Herman Talmadge as write-in candidate, all arranged to be sworn in and were concurrently trying to conduct state business from the Georgia State Capitol. Arnall relinquished his claim in favor of Thompson. Ultimately, Thompson was supported by the Supreme Court of Georgia.
    After returning from the war, Talmadge became active in Democratic Party politics. He ran his father's successful 1946 campaign for governor.
    More Details Hide Details Eugene Talmadge had been ill, and his supporters were worried about his surviving long enough to be sworn in. They studied the state constitution and found that if the governor-elect died before his term began, the Georgia General Assembly would choose between the second and third-place finishers for the successor. The elder Talmadge ran unopposed among Democrats, so the party officials arranged for write-in votes for Herman Talmadge as insurance.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1936
    Age 22
    Herman Talmadge earned a degree from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1936, where he had been a member of the Demosthenian Literary Society and Sigma Nu fraternity.
    More Details Hide Details He returned to McRae to set up a law practice. When World War II broke out, Talmadge joined the United States Navy, serving in combat in the South Pacific. He reached the rank of lieutenant commander.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1913
    Born
    Talmadge was born in 1913 in McRae in Telfair County in south central Georgia, the only son of Eugene Talmadge and his wife.
    More Details Hide Details His father served as Governor of Georgia during much of the 1930s and the 1940s.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)