Hermine Braunsteiner
Austrian concentratoin camp guard
Hermine Braunsteiner
Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan was a female camp guard and the first Nazi war criminal to be extradited from the United States.
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Hermine Braunsteiner's personal information overview.
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News
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„Wir hatten Leichen, aber keine Täter“ - Derwesten.de
Google News - over 5 years
Lediglich die wegen ihrer besonderen Brutalität als „Stute von Majdanek“ berüchtigte Aufseherin Hermine Braunsteiner-Ryan bekam wegen „gemeinschaftlichen Mordes in zwei Fällen an mindestens 100 Personen“ lebenslänglich. Sieben weitere Angeklagte wurden
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Das unsagbar Böse - RP ONLINE
Google News - over 5 years
... Staatsanwaltschaft zurückgeblieben: Es gab nicht etwa "lebenslang" für fünf NS-Täterinnen und -Täter, wie es die Ankläger beantragt hatten, sondern nur einmal "lebenslang" für die besonders grausame KZ-Aufseherin Hermine Braunsteiner-Ryan
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Corrections
NYTimes - about 11 years
An article on the obituary page on Dec. 2 about Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan, a Queens homemaker who had once been a Nazi death camp guard, referred incompletely to the coverage of her death, in 1999. Although her death appears to have gone unrecorded at the time in the United States, it was noted in passing by some newspapers -- including The Daily
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NYTimes article
A Nazi Past, a Queens Home Life, an Overlooked Death
NYTimes - about 11 years
Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan was a Queens homemaker in 1964 when The New York Times revealed her notorious past as a vicious Nazi death camp guard. Nearly a decade later, she became the first United States citizen to be extradited for war crimes. She was sent to West Germany, where she was tried, convicted and sentenced to life in prison. That was in
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Treasures Emerge From Field of the Dead at Maidanek
NYTimes - over 11 years
Adam Frydman shut his heavy-lidded eyes and vividly recalled his first glimpse of this unplowed field 62 years ago. He was 20 and had just arrived from the Warsaw ghetto with his father and brother. He imagined hundreds of Polish Jews huddled behind barbed wire fences. He heard barking dogs. He inhaled the unmistakable smell of death. When he got
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Simon Wiesenthal Is Dead at 96; Tirelessly Pursued Nazi Fugitives
NYTimes - over 11 years
Simon Wiesenthal, the death camp survivor who dedicated the rest of his life to tracking down fugitive Nazi war criminals, died yesterday at his home in Vienna. He was 96. He died in his sleep, said Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean and founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles. Mr. Wiesenthal had worked until 2003, when he announced his
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Breaking Away
NYTimes - almost 12 years
I was on an errand worthy of Hermes, messenger of Zeus. It was also the best boondoggle available to copy boys at The New York Times, where I worked for several months in the spring of 1960, little suspecting that I was making what is now called a life choice. The errand, as barked out by Sammy Solovitz, the tiny insomniac who supervised the copy
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New Accusations About Waldheim Recycle Old Bitterness
NYTimes - over 23 years
To the Editor: A new book, one of whose authors is a former employee of the World Jewish Congress, alleges that I discovered, then concealed, evidence of alleged World War II crimes committed by Kurt Waldheim (news article, Sept. 12). In 1979, I visited Yad Vashem, the Holocaust center in Jerusalem, as a member of its international council. The
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EXTRADITION SET FOR ACCUSED NAZI
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: A Federal judge today ordered the extradition of a retired grocery clerk to West Germany to face charges that he killed three prisoners while serving as a Nazi concentration camp guard in World War II. A Federal judge today ordered the extradition of a retired grocery clerk to West Germany to face charges that he killed three prisoners while
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NYTimes article
Bonn Asks Californian's War Crimes Extradition
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: The Justice Department announced today that the West German Government had requested extradition of a Los Angeles resident accused of war crimes committed while a guard at a Nazi concentration camp. It is believed to be only the second extradition request ever made by West Germany in a war crimes case here. The Justice Department announced
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EXTRADITION DUE IN WAR CRIME CASE
NYTimes - almost 31 years
The Justice Department is preparing to extradite a 65-year-old man to Israel to stand trial on charges of murdering thousands of Jews at a death camp in Poland in World War II. A Federal district judge in Cleveland has found ''probable cause'' to believe that the man, John Demjanjuk, ''committed murders of uncounted numbers of prisoners'' while
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U.S. EXTRADITES CROAT TO YUGOSLAVIA
NYTimes - about 31 years
An 86-year-old Croat described as the highest-ranking Nazi war criminal to enter the United States was flown today to Yugoslavia to face mass murder charges dating from World War II. The man, Andrija Artukovic, was sent off less than an hour after Associate Justice William H. Rehnquist of the Supreme Court had denied a stay. The Government said Mr.
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U.S. JUDGE ORDERS GUARD AT DEATH CAMP DEPORTED
NYTimes - almost 34 years
After six years of legal battles, a 75-year-old retired factory worker has been ordered deported for serving as a guard in a Nazi death camp where up to 800,000 prisoners were put to death during World War II. The man, Feodor Fedorenko of Philadelphia and formerly of Waterbury, Conn., ''assisted in the persecution of persons because of race or
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U.S. TO DEPORT ARCHBISHOP ACCUSED AS A NAZI ALLY
NYTimes - over 34 years
Valerian Trifa, the Rumanian Orthodox archbishop accused of being a Nazi sympathizer who incited bloody riots during World War II, will be deported from the United States, the Justice Department said today. Archbishop Trifa, the spiritual leader of 35,000 members of the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate, based in Grass Lake, Mich., will be the first
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PROPOSAL TO SPEED WAR CRIMES CASES STUDIED
NYTimes - over 35 years
The United States and West Germany are considering a proposal to allow Americans accused of Nazi war crimes to be extradited to Germany to stand trial without forcing the United States first to go through the long procedure of stripping them of their American citizenship. The proposal, by Simon Wiesenthal, the Vienna-based Nazi hunter, would
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NYTimes article
Headliners; BEHIND BARS, FINALLY
NYTimes - over 35 years
She ran as far as the United States, to a marriage with an American and a home in Maspeth, Queens. But Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan couldn't hide indefinitely and, finally found out, she was stripped of American citizenship in 1971 and deported in 1973. And last week, after a five-year trial, she was convicted of murder as a guard in the Maidanek
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Answers to Quiz
NYTimes - over 35 years
Questions appear on page 14. 1. Jerry Pate won his first victory in almost three years and celebrated his two-stroke victory in the Danny Thomas-Memphis Classic by leaping into the lake in front of the 18th green. 2. False. 3. Pigeon droppings. 4. Fred Silverman was president of NBC and Dennis C. Stanfill was chairman and chief executive officer of
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JEWISH GROUPS VOCE SATISFACTION AT TRIAL OUTCOME
NYTimes - over 35 years
Heads of American Jewish organizations expressed quiet satisfaction yesterday with the outcome of the Dusseldorf war crimes trial. ''It is not joy, not exhilaration,'' said Dr. Daniel Thursz, executive vice president of B'nai B'rith International. ''Not revenge either - it's justice.'' Although most heads of Jewish groups hailed the sentencing of
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Hermine Braunsteiner
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1999
    Age 79
    Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan died on April 19, 1999, aged 79, in Bochum, Germany.
    More Details Hide Details After the publicity surrounding Ryan's extradition, the United States government established (1979) a U.S. DOJ Office of Special Investigations to seek out war criminals to denaturalize or deport. It took jurisdiction previously held by the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
  • 1996
    Age 76
    Complications of diabetes, including a leg amputation, led to her release from Mülheimer women's prison in 1996.
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  • 1981
    Age 61
    On June 30, 1981, the court imposed a life sentence, a more severe punishment than those meted out to her co-defendants.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1973
    Age 53
    She was remanded in Düsseldorf in 1973, until her husband posted bail.
    More Details Hide Details The German court rejected Mrs. Ryan's arguments that it lacked jurisdiction, because she was not a German national but Austrian, and that the offenses alleged had occurred outside Germany. It ruled she had been a German citizen at the time and more importantly had been a German government official acting in the name of the German Reich. She stood trial in West Germany with 15 other former SS men and women from Majdanek. One of the witnesses against Hermine testified that she "seized children by their hair and threw them on trucks heading to the gas chambers." Others spoke of vicious beatings. One witness told of Hermine and the steel-studded jackboots with which she dealt blows to inmates. The third Majdanek trial (Majdanek-Prozess in German) was held in Düsseldorf. Beginning on November 26, 1975, and lasting 474 sessions, it was West Germany's longest and most expensive trial ever. The defendants included Ryan, former SS guard Hermann Hackmann and camp doctor Heinrich Schmidt. The court found insufficient evidence on six counts of the indictment and convicted her on three: murder of 80 people, abetting the murder of 102 children, and collaborating in the murder of 1000.
    The judge certified her extradition to the Secretary of State on May 1, 1973, and on August 7, 1973, Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan became the first Nazi war criminal extradited from the United States to Germany.
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    A prosecutor in Düsseldorf began investigating her wartime behavior, and in 1973 the German government requested her extradition, accusing her of joint responsibility in the death of 200,000 people.
    More Details Hide Details The United States court denied procedural claims that her denaturalization had been invalid (U.S. citizens could not be extradited to Germany), and that the charges alleged political offenses committed by a non-German outside West Germany. Later it rejected claims of lack of probable cause and double jeopardy. During the next year she sat with her husband in United States district court in Queens, hearing survivors' testimony against the former SS guard. They described whippings and fatal beatings. Rachel Berger, alone among the witnesses, testified she would celebrate retribution against the former vice-commandant of the women's camp at Majdanek.
  • FORTIES
  • 1968
    Age 48
    On August 22, 1968, United States authorities sought to revoke her citizenship, because she had failed to disclose her convictions for war crimes; she was denaturalized in 1971 after entering into a consent judgment to avoid deportation.
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  • 1964
    Age 44
    In 1964 Wiesenthal alerted the New York Times that Braunsteiner might have married a man named Ryan and might live in the Maspeth area of the Borough of Queens in New York.
    More Details Hide Details They assigned Joseph Lelyveld, then a young reporter, to find "Mrs. Ryan." They first lived at 54-44 82nd Street in western Elmhurst and moved to 52-11 72nd Street in Maspeth. He found her at the second doorbell he rang and later wrote that she greeted him at her front doorstep and said: "My God, I knew this would happen. You've come." Braunsteiner Ryan stated that she had been at Majdanek only a year, eight months of that time in the camp infirmary. "My wife, sir, wouldn't hurt a fly" said Ryan. "There's no more decent person on this earth. She told me this was a duty she had to perform. It was a conscriptive service."
  • THIRTIES
  • 1959
    Age 39
    She entered the United States in April 1959, becoming a United States citizen on January 19, 1963.
    More Details Hide Details They lived in Maspeth, Queens, where she was known as a fastidious housewife with a friendly manner, married to a construction worker. Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal picked up on her trail by chance on a visit to Tel Aviv. He was at a restaurant there when he received a call from his friend that he could not make it to their luncheon. The maitre d' announced the "phone call for Mr. Wiesenthal" and this led to his recognition by the other patrons—who stood up to applaud him. When he returned to his table there were several Majdanek survivors waiting and they told him about her and what she had done. On this he followed her trail to Vienna to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and then, via Toronto, to Queens.
  • 1958
    Age 38
    Russell Ryan, an American, met her on his vacation in Austria. They married in October 1958, after they had emigrated to Nova Scotia, Canada.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1948
    Age 28
    A court in Graz, Austria, convicted her of torture, maltreatment of prisoners and crimes against humanity and against human dignity at Ravensbrück (not Majdanek), then sentenced her to serve three years, beginning April 7, 1948; she was released early in April 1950.
    More Details Hide Details An Austrian civil court subsequently granted her amnesty from further prosecution there. She worked at low-level jobs in hotels and restaurants until emigrating.
  • 1946
    Age 26
    The Austrian police arrested her and turned her over to the British military occupation authorities; she remained incarcerated from May 6, 1946, until April 18, 1947.
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  • 1945
    Age 25
    On May 7, 1945, Hermine Braunsteiner fled the camp ahead of the Soviet Red Army.
    More Details Hide Details She then returned to Vienna, but soon left, complaining that there was not enough food there.
  • 1943
    Age 23
    Other survivors testified how she killed women by stomping on them with her steel-studded jackboots, earning her the nickname "The Stomping Mare". (In Polish "Kobyła", in German "Stute von Majdanek".) She received the War Merit Cross, 2nd class, in 1943, for her work.
    More Details Hide Details In January 1944, Hermine was ordered back to Ravensbrück as Majdanek began evacuations due to the approaching front line. She was promoted to supervising wardress at the Genthin subcamp of Ravensbrück, located outside Berlin. Witnesses say that she abused many of the prisoners with a horsewhip she carried, killing at least two women with it. A French physician, who was interned at Genthin recalled the sadism of Hermine while she ruled the camp: "I watched her administer twenty-five lashes with a riding crop to a young Russian girl suspected of having tried sabotage. Her back was full of lashes, but I was not allowed to treat her immediately."
    She was promoted to assistant wardress in January 1943, under Oberaufseherin Elsa Ehrich along with five other camp guards.
    More Details Hide Details By then most of the Aufseherinnen had been moved into Majdanek from the Alter Flughafen labor camp. Her abuses took many forms in the camp. She involved herself in "selections" of women and children to be sent to the gas chambers and whipped several women to death. Working alongside other female guards such as Elsa Ehrich, Hildegard Lächert, Marta Ulrich, Alice Orlowski, Charlotte Karla Mayer-Woellert, Erna Wallisch and Elisabeth Knoblich, Braunsteiner was infamous for her wild rages and tantrums. According to one witness at her later trial in Düsseldorf, she "seized children by their hair and threw them on trucks heading to the gas chambers”.
  • 1942
    Age 22
    On October 16, 1942, Braunsteiner took up her duties in the forced-labor apparel factory near the Majdanek concentration camp, established near Lublin, Poland a year earlier.
    More Details Hide Details It was both a labour camp (Arbeitslager) and an extermination camp (Vernichtungslager) with gas chambers and crematoria.
    After three years, a disagreement with Mandel led Braunsteiner to request a transfer in October 1942.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1939
    Age 19
    At the urging of her landlord, a German policeman, Braunsteiner applied for a better paying job supervising prisoners, quadrupling her income in time. She began her training on August 15, 1939, as an Aufseherin under Maria Mandel at Ravensbrück concentration camp.
    More Details Hide Details She remained there after the start of World War II, and the influx of new prisoners from occupied countries.
  • 1938
    Age 18
    In 1938 Braunsteiner became a German citizen after the Anschluss.
    More Details Hide Details She returned to Vienna from England and the same year relocated to Germany proper for a job at the Heinkel aircraft works in Berlin.
  • 1937
    Age 17
    From 1937 to 1938 she worked in England for an American engineer's household.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1919
    Born
    Born on July 16, 1919.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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