Howard Komives
American basketball player
Howard Komives
Howard K. "Butch" Komives (May 9, 1941 – March 22, 2009) was an American professional basketball player who spent ten seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) with the New York Knickerbockers, Detroit Pistons, Buffalo Braves and Kansas City-Omaha Kings. Born in Toledo, Ohio, he graduated from Woodward High School (Toledo) in 1960.
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News
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NBA roundup: Walt Bellamy, ex-Knick, dies at 74 - NorthJersey.com
Google News - over 3 years
ESPN NBA roundup: Walt Bellamy, ex-Knick, dies at 74 NorthJersey.com Walt Bellamy, the Hall of Fame center who averaged 20.1 points and 13.7 rebounds in 14 seasons in the NBA, died Saturday. He was 74. The North Carolina native was with the Knicks when he was traded to Detroit along with Howard Komives in December ... Walt Bellamy, 74, Hall of Fame NBA centerChicago Sun-Times Saturday's NBA notebook: Ex-Pistons, Hawks center Walt Bellamy dies at 74The Detroit News Hall of Fame center Walt Bellamy dies at 74SI.com all 49 news articles »
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Google News article
MACwood Squares: Who's The Greatest WMU Basketball Player Ever? - Hustle Belt
Google News - over 5 years
He was named to three straight first-team All-MACs during his time, but overshadowed by the likes of Howard Komives, no NBA was in his future. Not that his life went to pieces; Newsome went onto receive his doctorate and spent a career in the college
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Google News article
MACwood Squares: Who Was The Best Bowling Green Basketball Player? - Hustle Belt
Google News - almost 6 years
Howard Komives (1961-64) — Essentially the forgotten star in Falcons lore. Butch Komives has the highest scoring average (25.8/game), and in his senior year he had an obscene 36.7 points per game, and this is a MAC record. A second-round NBA pick in
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Google News article
Howard Komives, 67, Ex-Knick, Dies
NYTimes - almost 8 years
Howard Komives, a sharpshooting guard who played for 10 seasons in the National Basketball Association but who was perhaps best remembered for the trade that sent him to the Detroit Pistons from the Knicks for the future Hall of Famer Dave DeBusschere, died Sunday in Toledo, Ohio. He was 67. Komives's son, Shane, said his father died after surgery
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NYTimes article
Ken McIntyre, 63; Won 2 Titles for St. John's
NYTimes - over 10 years
Ken McIntyre, a star guard who helped propel an underdog St. John's team to the Holiday Festival and National Invitation Tournament championships in 1965 to bring a stirring conclusion to Coach Joe Lapchick's Hall of Fame career, died May 31. He was 63. The cause was cancer, his brother Bob, a teammate for two seasons, told The Associated Press.
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NYTimes article
Sports of The Times; A Big Player Who Did All the Little Things
NYTimes - almost 14 years
What one remembers about Dave DeBusschere, the basketball player, the one player who was perhaps most responsible for the emergence of the champion Knicks in the early 1970's -- the Camelot years of the Knicks -- is that he could be a Hummer or a BMW, depending on the situation in a particular night. Burly, rock-jawed, his thighs so muscular they
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NYTimes article
Eddie Donovan Dies at 78; Architect of Storied Knicks
NYTimes - about 16 years
Eddie Donovan, the Knicks' general manager who built the electrifying team that captured the 1970 National Basketball Association championship -- the first title in the club's history -- died Saturday in Bernardsville, N.J. He was 78. The cause was complications of a stroke, his family said. ''Building a ball club is like putting together a puzzle
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NYTimes article
Eddie Donovan, Architect of Storied Knicks, Dies at 78
NYTimes - about 16 years
Eddie Donovan, the Knicks' general manager who built the electrifying team that captured the 1970 National Basketball Association championship -- the first title in the club's history -- died yesterday in Bernardsville, N.J. He was 78. The cause was complications of a stroke, his family said. ''Building a ball club is like putting together a puzzle
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NYTimes article
BASKETBALL; 8 Players In: Walton and Erving Lead Way to Hall
NYTimes - about 24 years
Julius Erving and Bill Walton, two extraordinary players who helped define the 1970's but also made their mark on the 1980's, were among the eight former players selected yesterday to the Basketball Hall of Fame. Erving, known worldwide as the inimitable Dr. J, and Walton, considered by many to be, when healthy, the most multiskilled center in the
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NYTimes article
ON BASKETBALL; No Shortcuts for Knicks No Matter Where Ewing Stands
NYTimes - over 25 years
Patrick Ewing didn't give up on Bernard King. He didn't trade Rod Strickland for Maurice Cheeks. He didn't relinquish first-round draft picks for stop-gap veterans Kiki Vandeweghe, Gerald Henderson and Jawann Oldham. He didn't hand Johnny Newman over to Charlotte. True, he became close friends with Kenny Walker, but he didn't waste a high
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NYTimes article
Question Box
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: Aiming for 300 Aiming for 300 Q. With his 287th victory last week, Tommy John is closing in on the Hall of Fame yardstick of 300 for a career. Among active pitchers, who else is close to 300? A. There are only three others with more than 200 victories, headed by Nolan Ryan, who is 42 years old, has won 273 times, and just might have enough
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NYTimes article
Frazier Gains Hall of Fame
NYTimes - about 30 years
LEAD: Walt Frazier, the multitalented and unflappable backcourt star who helped the Knicks win National Basketball Association championships in 1970 and 1973, was among five former players elected yesterday to the Basketball Hall of Fame. Walt Frazier, the multitalented and unflappable backcourt star who helped the Knicks win National Basketball
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NYTimes article
STANDOUT BASKETBALL PLAYER TEACHES BY HIS EXAMPLE
NYTimes - about 31 years
In the aftermath of another Miami University basketball game here, interviewers are clustered as usual around Ron Harper, the Redskins' diversely talented 6-foot-6-inch senior forward. As usual, Harper is talking too fast to be completely understood, slowed only by a persistent stutter. Standing on the bench in front of Harper's locker is one of
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NYTimes article
SPORTS OF THE TIMES; NOT SO COMFORTABLE OFF THE COURT
NYTimes - about 31 years
THE BANNER with the No. 22 on it will still be hanging from the rafters of Madison Square Garden the next time the Knicks are home, Tuesday night, but Dave DeBusschere will almost certainly not be in the stands beneath his old number. As executive vice president of the Knicks, DeBusschere often seemed uncomfortable in the stands at the Garden,
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NYTimes article
Bradley, DeBusschere Join Hall of Fame
NYTimes - about 34 years
Teammates. Roommates. And now, fittingly, Bill Bradley and Dave DeBusschere have been cast together again. The two former Knicks were named yesterday to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Bradley, now a Democratic United States Senator from New Jersey, and DeBusschere, now the Knicks' executive vice president, will be among six men
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NYTimes article
MEN IN THE NEWS; KNICKS' NEW CHIEF EXECUTIVE AND THEIR COACH
NYTimes - almost 35 years
When Dave DeBusschere was introduced at Madison Square Garden yesterday as the new executive vice president and director of basketball operations of the Knicks, Gerri DeBusschere, his wife of 14 years, watched with pride and wonder. ''Living with Dave,'' she said, ''is like living with Jack Armstrong, the all-American Boy. He's a genuinely nice
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NYTimes article
CELTICS BEAT KNICKS: DEBUSSCHERE SALUTED
NYTimes - almost 36 years
On a night honoring Dave DeBusschere, whose defense often helped the Knicks win games, it was Robert Parish's defense that enabled the the Boston Celtics to beat the Knicks, 118-116, at Madison Square Garden last night. Parish, the 7-foot-1-inch center, blocked seven shots, including two in the last 26 seconds when the Knicks threatened to overtake
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Howard Komives
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2009
    Age 67
    Komives died at University of Toledo Medical Center on March 22, 2009 at age 67.
    More Details Hide Details His wife Marcia had found him unconscious and unresponsive in their home three days earlier.
  • 2007
    Age 65
    In 2007, Komives was inducted into the Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1970
    Age 28
    This was what Komives is most remembered for, but only because DeBusschere was the last major addition to the Knicks before it won its first NBA Championship in 1970.
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  • 1968
    Age 26
    With the emergence of Walt Frazier as the starting point guard, Komives was traded along with Walt Bellamy to the Pistons for Dave DeBusschere on December 19, 1968.
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  • 1967
    Age 25
    By the time Red Holzman became the Knicks' coach midway through the 1967–68 season, Komives was involved in a personal feud with Cazzie Russell that negatively affected the rest of the team.
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    The most productive campaign of his professional career was in 1967, when his averages per contest were 15.7 points and 6.2 assists.
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  • 1965
    Age 23
    After the Knicks acquired Dick Barnett prior to the 1965 - 66 season, Komives was shifted to point guard, a position with which he struggled, drawing the wrath of Knicks fans.
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    He was named to the All-Rookie Team in 1965, after starting in every regular-season match and averaging 12.2 points per game.
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  • 1964
    Age 22
    Komives was selected thirteenth overall in the second round by the New York Knicks in the 1964 NBA Draft.
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  • 1963
    Age 21
    Despite Thurmond's graduation and the team's fall to third place in the conference, Komives led the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in scoring during the 1963–64 season with 36.7 points per game, still BGSU and MAC records.
    More Details Hide Details Even though he no longer is the school's all-time leading scorer (his 1,834 total points is currently third), his 25.8 scoring average is still a Falcons record. He was inducted into the BGSU Athletics Hall of Fame in 1970. His son Shane was a four-year basketball letterman at the same school from 1993 to 1996.
  • 1962
    Age 20
    Komives played college basketball at Bowling Green State University (BGSU), where he led the team in scoring in each of his three varsity seasons. As a starting shooting guard, he teamed with Nate Thurmond, the school's all-time leading rebounder, to lead the Falcons to back-to-back Mid-American Conference (MAC) championships and NCAA tournament appearances in 1962 and 1963.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1960
    Age 18
    Born in Toledo, Ohio, he graduated from Woodward High School (Toledo) in 1960.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1941
    Born
    Born on May 9, 1941.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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