Huntington Hartford
American businessman, philanthropists, film producer, art collector
Huntington Hartford
George Huntington Hartford II was the heir to the A&P supermarket fortune. When he died in 2008, some obituaries noted that, Hartford "had once ranked among the world's richest people", but he squandered most of his fortune on investments and business decisions over the years. Huntington's father, Edward V.
Biography
Huntington Hartford's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Huntington Hartford
News
News abour Huntington Hartford from around the web
Gov. Cargo's bust to grace NM State Capitol - Albany Times Union
Google News - over 5 years
The Huntington Hartford Foundation paid her to create her art. Later, she was accepted into a similar residency program at the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos. The artist said she doesn't remember who commissioned her to do Cargo's bust
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Google News article
Musei sull'acqua: la Joseph Conrad di Mystic Seaport - MondoNauticaBlog (Blog)
Google News - over 5 years
In effetti, dopo il già citato giro del mondo (un viaggio di ben 58mila miglia), fu acquistata da George Huntington Hartford, il quale decise proprio di cambiargli nome e di dedicare le sue gesta a Joseph Conrad. Ha inizio così una nuova serie di
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Google News article
Stanford Hospital: Baby Steps as Hospital Moves Forward - Curbed SF
Google News - almost 6 years
Stone's work is not very popular these days, despite the resurgent interest in Mid-Century Modern, and his Kennedy Center in Washington DC is subject to regular, ongoing derision; his museum for Huntington Hartford in New York underwent a controversial
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Google News article
The little chapel on Club Med grounds on Paradise (Hog) Island - thebahamasweekly.com
Google News - almost 6 years
I met Mrs Clap (a former teacher of English at Queen's College with Roger Kelty) at the airport and she also said that the stones came over when Huntington Hartford built the Cloisters. Mrs Karen Cargill of Kerzner International asked if we had any
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Google News article
Every fiber of their being - NewsOK.com
Google News - almost 6 years
She received the Huntington-Hartford Fellowship in 1954 and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Fellowship in 1955. Then came the awards. In 1958, she was given the American Institute of Architecture Craftsmanship Award in Kansas City for her repousse doors at
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New York Parties Are So Over - Village Voice (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
Huntington Hartford was not there but Teresa Wright was. Sally Kellerman stood under the Rainbow Room's cardboard Himalayan Arches stating to the exploding flash-bulbs, "Yes, I did leave tonight's premiere after 10 minutes...and yes by the front door
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Google News article
Casino Chief Is Said to Be Rembrandt's New Owner
NYTimes - about 7 years
The mysterious telephone bidder who paid $33.2 million for a Rembrandt portrait at Christie's in London last week was buying the painting on behalf of the Las Vegas casino owner Stephen A. Wynn, according to several experts familiar with the transaction. The price, an auction record for this artist, was nearly three times what Mr. Wynn paid for a
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NYTimes article
INSIDE ART; Old Master Steps Out, Heading To Market
NYTimes - over 7 years
A Rembrandt portrait that has been hidden in a private collection and not seen by the public for nearly 40 years is being sold at Christie's in London on Dec. 8. ''Portrait of a Man, Half-Length, With His Arms Akimbo,'' from 1658, depicts an unknown sitter, his expression imperious and his pose self-assured. Experts at Christie's say it could fetch
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NYTimes article
THE REMIX; The View From Here Scottish Fling
NYTimes - over 8 years
The Hutsons stayed at the Scotsman (20 North Bridge; theetoncollection.com; doubles from about $240), a boutique hotel in the dramatic old Scotsman newspaper building. ''Quite cozy and convenient, and the staff are sweet,'' Christina says. For an easy meal, they like the North Bridge Brasserie downstairs (northbridgebrasserie.com). At the Edinburgh
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NYTimes article
The Rich and Famous, at Rest in Eden
NYTimes - over 8 years
GHOSTS and goblins may own the rights to Halloween, but the rest of the year belongs to the less restless residents of cemeteries throughout the region, where carefully planned and well-tended grounds have been attracting both the living and the dead for eons. By the mid-1800s, spectacular plantings, shade trees and wide carriageways had
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NYTimes article
ARCHITECTURE REVIEW; New Face, Renewed Mission
NYTimes - over 8 years
It was fun while it lasted. The passionate battle fought recently over the redesign of 2 Columbus Circle, the curious white marble structure built by Huntington Hartford to house his art collection, was reminiscent of the preservation wars of the 1960s. When was the last time you saw preservationists marching in the streets? Or best-selling writers
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Paid Notice: Deaths HARTFORD, HUNTINGTON
NYTimes - almost 9 years
HARTFORD--Huntington. Such memories. Opening night of The Museum; the first issue of 'Show'; my first taste of 'Paradise'. Temporarily playing house for one wife and laughing while you urged another down from the tree-tops. You never forgot a friend, -a liquor store for one, a business for another and you always took care of Hal ...The parties, the
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NYTimes article
Huntington Hartford, A. & P. Heir Adept at Losing Millions, Dies at 97
NYTimes - almost 9 years
Huntington Hartford, who inherited a fortune from the A. & P. grocery business and lost most of it chasing his dreams as an entrepreneur, arts patron and man of leisure, died Monday at his home in Lyford Cay in the Bahamas. He was 97. His death was announced by his daughter, Juliet Hartford. Mr. Hartford, a grandson of a principal founder of the
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NYTimes article
36 Hours in Hollywood
NYTimes - about 9 years
HOLLYWOOD is one of those rare places that live up to their stereotypes, right down to the sign. But with minimal effort, it can offer a whole lot more. The pedestrian-friendly district represents both Los Angeles' past, with icons like the Capitol Records building, and the city's future -- multi-ethnic, vertical, dense. A recent renaissance means
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NYTimes article
WHAT'S OFFLINE; Getting Away on Any Budget
NYTimes - over 10 years
WITH the cost of gas staying stubbornly around $3 a gallon, driving vacations have lost some appeal. Cities like Boston, New York, Chicago and San Francisco are perfect for exploring on foot and by using mass transportation, but they can be pricey when it comes to dining and lodging. Budget Travel identifies ''four friendly cities'' where ''you can
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NYTimes article
A Museum Clad in Billboards? The Critics Are Not Pleased
NYTimes - almost 11 years
When the Museum of Arts and Design bought 2 Columbus Circle last year, its director, Holly Hotchner, defended the decision to reconstruct it, saying, ''I think nearly everyone would agree 2 Columbus Circle is a tremendous eyesore.'' Now it is a tremendous ad. Billboards for ''The Da Vinci Code,'' the film version, cover construction scaffolding at
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NYTimes article
Paid Notice: Deaths KISSEL, WILLIAM THORN JR.
NYTimes - almost 11 years
KISSEL--William Thorn Jr. died February 10. Beloved husband of Barbara Case Kissel (d. 1978), beloved father of Michael Case Kissel and William Thorn Kissel III (d. 1980), beloved father-in-law of Elena Thornton Kissel, beloved Grandfather of Siena Case Kissel, Lucy Elena Kissel and Rosalie Thorn Kissel. Born Feb. 6, 1920, NYC. Choate School,
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2 COLUMBUS CIRCLE; A Colonialist at Play
NYTimes - about 11 years
To the Editor: Re ''The Secret History'' [Jan. 15]: Herbert Muschamp shares an important perspective on architecture and its role in the life of a city. But his use of 2 Columbus Circle does a disservice both to his thesis and those he seeks to recognize. Huntington Hartford was a reactionary, not a rebel. The Tahitian-themed room for his Gauguins
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Huntington Hartford
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2008
    Age 96
    Hartford died at his home in Lyford Cay on May 19, 2008 at the age of 97.
    More Details Hide Details No cause of death was publicly released. His remains are interred at Lakeview Memorial Gardens & Mausoleums in Nassau.
  • 2004
    Age 92
    In February 2004, he and his daughter moved to Lyford Cay in the Bahamas.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1988
    Age 76
    Catherine Hartford died of a drug overdose in June 1988.
    More Details Hide Details John Hartford later became a musician and music teacher. He died of throat cancer on April 15, 2011.
  • 1981
    Age 69
    Five years later, he married Elaine Kay but was divorced again in 1981.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1964
    Age 52
    To house his extensive collection of 19th- and 20th-century art, Hartford built the Gallery of Modern Art at 2 Columbus Circle in Manhattan which opened in 1964.
    More Details Hide Details Pointedly, it did not include Abstract Expressionism which Hartford panned in his book, Art or Anarchy. Hartford was a patron of the architect Edward Durell Stone who designed the modernist marble-clad structure often derided as the "lollipop building". Stone had previously designed the Museum of Modern Art for the Rockefeller family. Hartford commissioned Salvador Dalí to paint The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus for the museum's opening. The museum also included Hartford's paintings by Monet, Manet, Degas, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Hartford closed the museum after five years. Later the building housed the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and was recently rebuilt with a new facade to house the Museum of Arts and Design.
    Hartford's taste for Los Angeles began to wane, however, after the Los Angeles County Museum of Art rejected an exhibition he proposed. He decided to build his own museum in New York City, the 1964 Gallery of Modern Art on New York's Columbus Circle, declaring that building a museum in Los Angeles was like putting up "a theater in Oklahoma" due to a lack of audience.
    More Details Hide Details With the financial commitment to a new museum in New York and tiring of his art colony, he asked local government officials and wealthy patrons to contribute to the colony's support. Lacking what he felt would be sufficient commitment, he shut down the colony in 1965. Hartford owned an extensive art collection. In an interview by Edward R. Murrow on his show Person to Person he gave a tour of the collection at his Beekman Place apartment including Rembrandt's "Portrait of a man, half-length, with his arms akimbo", which sold at Christie's auction house in London on December 8, 2009 for $33 million, a world record for a Rembrandt.
    In 1964, Hartford offered the Pines as a gift to the city but was turned down by Mayor Sam Yorty.
    More Details Hide Details As Lloyd Wright recalled in 1977, "Here was this very wealthy man, and he wanted to give something very stunning to Hollywood. The Chambers of Commerce, the hotel owners and the various businesses were jealous of the park and with the help of the city officials, the city refused to give us permits. Hunt was so angry that he wanted to get out immediately and sold the property to Jules Berman who destroyed the mansion and let the place run down."
  • 1962
    Age 50
    In 1962, Hartford married Diane Brown at "Melody Farm" in Mahwah, New Jersey.
    More Details Hide Details They had a daughter, Cynara Juliet, before divorcing in 1970.
  • FORTIES
  • 1959
    Age 47
    In 1959, Hartford bought Hog Island in the Bahamas, renamed it Paradise Island.
    More Details Hide Details He developed it over the next three years hoping to turn it into another Monte Carlo. One feature of his Ocean Club was a cloister built from the disassembled stones of a monastery that William Randolph Hearst had stored in a Florida warehouse. In an interview with David Frost on British television, Hartford stated that the flag he created for Paradise Island was in the shape of a "P" and that he wanted to put it on the moon as a symbol of peace for the world. Hartford was responsible for getting the Gambling License for Paradise Island by hiring Sir Stafford Sands, a Bahamian lawyer. In 1969, Hartford produced the Broadway show Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?, which opened at the Belasco Theater starring the then-unknown actor Al Pacino. Pacino won a Tony for his performance. Hartford was a patron of the arts, building an artists colony above Los Angeles and later a gallery in New York City, and his opinions the arts were equally strong. He criticized Abstract Expressionists, believing they had ushered in a great "ice age of art," freezing out the grand traditions of music, painting and sculpture; he described Pablo Picasso as a "mountebank". Beyond expressionism, he derided the "beatnik, the Existentialist, the juvenile delinquent, the zaniest of abstract art, the weirdest aberrations of the mentally unbalanced, the do-nothing philosophy of Zen Buddhism" as a result of wanton "abuse of liberty and freedom."
  • 1957
    Age 45
    When his uncle George Ludlum Hartford died in 1957, the trust set up by the elder George Huntington Hartford was liquidated and Hartford inherited his portion of the estate.
    More Details Hide Details The Chicago Tribune estimated his wealth in 1969 as half a billion dollars. In 1959, Mike Wallace introduced him on television interview as being worth half a billion dollars.
    This partnership led to Flynn staying in Hartford's pool-house briefly in 1957–58 and is the origin of a legend that "The Pines" was Flynn's estate.
    More Details Hide Details Later, Hartford produced the play on Broadway.
  • 1955
    Age 43
    In 1955, Hartford founded the Oil Shale Corporation, later known as Tosco, and was its majority shareholder and chairman.
    More Details Hide Details Tosco was later acquired by ConocoPhillips. He also set up the Denver Research Institute at the University of Denver to find alternate methods of oil extraction. During this period, he also wrote and produced The Master of Thornfield, a stage adaptation of Jane Eyre that ran for two weeks in Cincinnati starring Errol Flynn as Mr. Rochester.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1950
    Age 38
    In 1950, Hartford produced Hello Out There, the last film of James Whale, the acclaimed director of the 1931 version of Frankenstein.
    More Details Hide Details He produced several films starring Marjorie Steele and encouraged her to become an artist.
  • 1949
    Age 37
    Huntington's second wife was Marjorie Steele, an aspiring actress whom Hartford married in 1949. The couple had two children, Catherine (born 1950) and John Hartford (born 1958). The couple divorced in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details
    Hartford owned Huntington Hartford Productions which produced several films including the Abbott and Costello film, Africa Screams, in 1949.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1940
    Age 28
    In 1940, Hartford invested $100,000 to help start a newspaper, PM, with Marshall Field III and worked as a reporter for the publication.
    More Details Hide Details An avid sailor, having donated his yacht to the Coast Guard at the start of World War II, he commanded a supply ship in the Pacific. After the war, he moved to Los Angeles and attempted to purchase Republic Pictures and RKO Studios from Howard Hughes. Huntington also started a modeling agency and an artists' colony, and opened a theater. In the 1950s, Hartford purchased a penthouse duplex on the 13th and 14th floors of One Beekman Place in the 1950s after moving from an apartment at the River House in New York City. He owned a home called "Pompano" on 240 El Vedado Drive in Palm Beach, a estate in Mahwah, New Jersey called "Melody Farm", a Hollywood estate known as "The Pines" also known as Runyon Canyon Park, a townhouse in London, a home in Juan-les-Pins France and a house on Paradise Island in the Bahamas.
  • 1936
    Age 24
    On 10 November 1936, he purchased from Alan Villiers the sailing ship Joseph Conrad which he converted to a private yacht, and donated to the U.S. Maritime Commission as a sail training ship in 1939.
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  • 1934
    Age 22
    After his graduation from Harvard in 1934, he went to work at A&P headquarters in New York in the statistical department.
    More Details Hide Details He lived on a trust fund that generated about $1.5 million per year.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1931
    Age 19
    Hartford was married four times, all ending in divorce, and had four children. His mother intended Huntington to marry Doris Duke, but in April 1931, Huntington married Mary Lee Epling, the 18-year-old daughter of a dentist from Covington, West Virginia. They divorced in 1939.
    More Details Hide Details In 1938, Huntington had a son, Edward "Buzzy" Barton, with dancer Mary Barton. Hartford supported the boy financially but refused to legally acknowledge him as his son. In 1967, Edward Barton died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1922
    Age 10
    After his father died in 1922, Hartford's mother sent him to St. Paul's School.
    More Details Hide Details He later majored in English literature at Harvard University.
    After his father's death in 1922, Hartford became one of the heirs to the estate left by his grandfather and namesake, George Huntington Hartford.
    More Details Hide Details After graduating from Harvard University in 1934, he only briefly worked for A&P. For the rest of his life, Hartford focused on numerous other business and charitable enterprises. He owned Paradise Island in the Bahamas, and had numerous other business and real estate interests over his lifetime including the Oil Shale Corporation (TOSCO), which he founded in 1955. Hartford was once known as one of the world's richest people. His final years were spent living in the Bahamas with his daughter, Juliet. Huntington Hartford was born in New York City, the son of Henrietta Guerard (Pollitzer) and Edward V. Hartford (1870–1922). He was named George Huntington Hartford II for his grandfather, George Huntington Hartford. His father and uncles, John Augustine Hartford and George Ludlum Hartford, privately owned the A&P Supermarket, which at one point had 16,000 stores in the U.S. and was the largest retail empire in the world. In the 1950s A&P was the world's largest grocer and, next to General Motors, it sold more goods than any other company in the world. Time magazine reported that A&P had sales of $2.7 billion in 1950. His maternal grandfather was from an Austrian Jewish family, and his maternal grandmother, who was Protestant, had deep roots in South Carolina. Hartford's father was a successful inventor and manufacturer who perfected the automotive shock absorber. Along with his brothers, Edward was also an heir to the A&P fortune and served as A&P's corporate secretary as well as one of three trustees that controlled A&P's stock.
  • 1911
    Born
    Born on April 18, 1911.
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