Ida Lupino
Actress, director
Ida Lupino
Ida Lupino was an English-born film actress and director, and a pioneer among women filmmakers. In her 48-year career, she appeared in 59 films and directed seven others, mostly in the United States. She appeared in serial television programmes 58 times and directed 50 other episodes. Additionally, she contributed as a writer to five films and four TV episodes.
Biography
Ida Lupino's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Ida Lupino from around the web
Break out the popcorn! Friendswood Library hosting classic movie night series - Your Houston News
Google News - over 5 years
The September 22 movie night features “On Dangerous Ground” starring Robert Ryan and Ida Lupino. This black and white classic film was directed by Nicholas Ray in 1952. On October 6, the featured movie is “Scaramouche” starring Stewart Granger,
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Humphrey Bogart on TCM: THE CAINE MUTINY, THE MALTESE FALCON, SAHARA - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The star of Little Caesar, The Sea Wolf, House of Strangers, Key Largo, etc. is followed by James Cagney — when in psycho mode — and a whole bunch of tough dames, among them Barbara Stanwyck, Jane Greer, Ann Sheridan, and Ida Lupino
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Morning Call Sheet: Kevin Smith Retires? 'Tangled' and Charter Internet Is ... - Big Hollywood
Google News - over 5 years
Dir: Raoul Walsh Cast: George Raft, Ann Sheridan, Ida Lupino. BW-95 mins, TV-PG, CC. Melodrama is usually a description used to criticize a film but that's only because Hollywood can no longer craft a decent melodrama. When melodrama works it makes for
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The man in the middle - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
If that sounds like a variant on “High Sierra,'' then the presence of Ida Lupino clinches it. The sister of the chief suspect, she's also blind. It's a prescription for melodrama and sentiment of the worst sort - except for two factors
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Things To Do In NYC This Week - Albany Times Union (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Modern dance classes given by Limón Dance Company continue on Saturday at 11 am “High Sierra,” the 1941 film with Humphrey Bogart and Ida Lupino, will be shown on Monday at dusk as part of a film festival co-sponsored by HBO. And on Tuesday at 7 pm,
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Spare Times for Aug. 12-18 - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Modern dance classes given by Limón Dance Company continue on Saturday at 11 am “High Sierra,” the 1941 film with Humphrey Bogart and Ida Lupino, will be shown on Monday at dusk as part of a film festival co-sponsored by HBO. And on Tuesday at 7 pm,
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Robert Ryan's Quiet Furies
NYTimes - over 5 years
BORN to play beautifully tortured, angry souls, the actor Robert Ryan was a familiar movie face for more than two decades in Hollywood's classical years, his studio ups and downs, independent detours and outlier adventures paralleling the arc of American cinema as it went from a national pastime to near collapse. A little prettier and he might have
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Robert Ryan's Quiet Furies - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Robert Mitchum was at the studio with Ryan (they made several films together, including “The Racket”) alongside those great dames Ida Lupino and Gloria Grahame. At RKO Ryan broke out with his supporting turn in Edward Dmytryk's “Crossfire” (1947) as
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The Lost Projects And Unproduced Screenplays Of Terrence Malick - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Finally, there is the trucking comedy “Deadhead Miles” that was made into a film starring Alan Arkin, Richard Kiel, Hector Elizondo and interestingly enough, Ida Lupino and George Raft as themselves. But directed by Vernon Zimmerman, it was considered
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The truth about a truth-stretcher - Philadelphia Inquirer
Google News - over 5 years
... Flynn as the goldilocks general); a taut on-the-lam thriller with Humphrey Bogart; a "woman's picture" steeped in noir starring the glorious Ida Lupino; and one of the iconic gangster movies of the ages, featuring James Cagney in full psycho mode
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SyFy Annual Twilight Zone Marathon - Gather.com
Google News - over 5 years
Film greats such as Ida Lupino, Ron Howard, Burt Reynolds, Burgess Meridith and scores of others took a turn in an episode or two. Not only are the episodes beautifully writted, but the social commentary of many still holds up today
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We Shall Not See His Like Again - Wall Street Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Walsh (center) with Ida Lupino and Humphrey Bogart on 'High Sierra.' David Thomson has noted that Walsh never made the kind of self-important, big-themed movies that get serious critical attention. Mostly he worked in the genres—westerns, crime dramas
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Going South: American Noir in Mexico - East Bay Express
Google News - over 5 years
"Going South" is an outgrowth of that, an eight-pack of rock-solid movies by such powerhouse directors as Jacques Tourneur (Out of the Past), Phil Karlson (Kansas City Confidential), and Ida Lupino (The Hitch-Hiker), culminating with Orson Welles'
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DVD Extra: John Garfield at the Warner Archive, Part 1 - New York Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Of even greater concern to Mitchell is that his bored daughter -- second-billed Ida Lupino, terrific in a role created by Sylvia Sidney on Broadway -- seems more interested in Garfield than her hard-working beau, played by the inevitable Eddie Albert
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Peter Falk, TV's 'Columbo,' dies at 83 - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
... Leonard Nimoy, Jack Cassidy, Patrick McGoohan, Martin Landau, Robert Conrad and Johnny Cash, who in a memorable episode played a gospel singer who kills a woman (played by Ida Lupino) who had been blackmailing him by crashing his private plane
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ida Lupino
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1995
    Age 77
    Lupino died from a stroke while undergoing treatment for colon cancer in Los Angeles on 3 August 1995, at the age of 77.
    More Details Hide Details Lupino's memoirs, Ida Lupino: Beyond the Camera, were edited after her death and published by Mary Ann Anderson. Lupino learned filmmaking from everyone she observed on set, including William Ziegler, the cameraman for Not Wanted. When in preproduction on Never Fear, she conferred with Michael Gordon on directorial technique, organization, and plotting. Cinematographer Archie Stout said of Ms. Lupino, "Ida has more knowledge of camera angles and lenses than any director I've ever worked with, with the exception of Victor Fleming. She knows how a woman looks on the screen and what light that woman should have, probably better than I do." Lupino also worked with editor Stanford Tischler, who said of her, "She wasn’t the kind of director who would shoot something, then hope any flaws could be fixed in the cutting room. The acting was always there, to her credit."
  • 1984
    Age 66
    In 1984, Lupino petitioned a California court to appoint her business manager, Mary Ann Anderson, as her conservator due to poor business dealings from her prior business management company and her long separation from Howard Duff.
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  • 1983
    Age 65
    Lupino and Duff divorced in 1983.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1951
    Age 33
    Lupino's third and final marriage was to actor Howard Duff, whom she married on 21 October 1951.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had a daughter, Bridget, on 23 April 1952.
    Lupino filed for divorce in September, 1951, already pregnant from an affair with future husband Howard Duff.
    More Details Hide Details The child was born seven months after she filed for divorce from Collier Young.
  • 1949
    Age 31
    Her husband Collier Young and she formed an independent company, The Filmakers, to produce, direct, and write low-budget, issue-oriented films. Her first directing job came unexpectedly in 1949 when director Elmer Clifton suffered a mild heart attack and could not finish Not Wanted, a film Lupino co-produced and co-wrote.
    More Details Hide Details Lupino stepped in to finish the film, but did not take directorial credit out of respect for Clifton. Although the film's subject of out-of-wedlock pregnancy was controversial, it received a vast amount of publicity, and she was invited to discuss the film with Eleanor Roosevelt on a national radio program. Never Fear (1949) was her first director's credit. After producing four more films about social issues, including Outrage (1950), a film about rape, Lupino directed her first hard-paced, all-male-cast film, The Hitch-Hiker (1953), making her the first woman to direct a film noir. The Filmakers went on to produce 12 feature films, six of which Lupino directed or co-directed, five of which she wrote or co-wrote, three of which she acted in, and one of which she co-produced. Lupino once called herself a "bulldozer" to secure financing for her production company, but she referred to herself as "mother" while on set. On set, the back of her director's chair was labeled "Mother of Us All ". Her studio emphasized her femininity, often at the urging of Lupino herself. She credited her refusal to renew her contract with Warner Bros. under the pretenses of domesticity, claiming "I had decided that nothing lay ahead of me but the life of the neurotic star with no family and no home." She made a point to seem nonthreatening in a male-dominated environment, stating, "That's where being a man makes a great deal of difference.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1948
    Age 30
    Her second marriage was to producer Collier Young on 5 August 1948. They divorced in 1951.
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    In June 1948, Lupino became an American citizen and a staunch Democrat who supported the presidency of John F. Kennedy.
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    She moved to Columbia Pictures in 1948, where she appeared as a nightclub singer in the film noir, Road House, performing her musical numbers in the film.
    More Details Hide Details She starred in On Dangerous Ground in 1951, and may have taken on some of the directing tasks of the film while director Nicholas Ray was ill. While on suspension, Lupino had ample time to observe filming and editing processes and she became interested in directing. She described how bored she was on set while "someone else seemed to be doing all the interesting work."
  • 1947
    Age 29
    After the drama Deep Valley (1947) finished shooting, neither Warner Bros. nor Lupino moved to renew her contract and she left Warner Bros. in 1947.
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  • 1942
    Age 24
    In 1942, she rejected an offer to star opposite Ronald Reagan in Kings Row and was immediately put on suspension at the studio.
    More Details Hide Details Eventually, a tentative rapprochement was brokered, but her relationship with her studio remained strained. Her performance in The Hard Way (1943) won the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress. She starred in Pillow to Post (1945), which was her only comedic leading role.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1938
    Age 20
    Lupino was married and divorced three times. She married actor Louis Hayward in November 1938. They separated in May 1944 and divorced in May 1945.
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  • 1933
    Age 15
    Dubbed "the English Jean Harlow", she was discovered by Paramount in the 1933 film Money For Speed, playing a good girl/bad girl dual role.
    More Details Hide Details Lupino claimed the talent scouts only saw her play the sweet girl in the film and not the part of the prostitute, so she was asked to try out for the lead role in Alice in Wonderland (1933). When she arrived in Hollywood, the Paramount producers did not know what to make of their sultry potential leading lady, but she did get a five-year contract. Lupino starred in over a dozen films in the mid-1930s, working with Columbia in a two-film deal, one of which, The Light That Failed (1939), was a role she acquired after running into the director's office unannounced, demanding an audition. After this performance, she began to be taken seriously as a dramatic actress. As a result, her parts improved during the 1940s, and she jokingly referred to herself as "the poor man's Bette Davis", taking the roles that Davis refused.
    She played leading roles in five British films in 1933 at Warner Bros.
    More Details Hide Details ' Teddington studios and for Julius Hagen at Twickenham, including in The Ghost Camera with John Mills, and I Lived with You with Ivor Novello.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1918
    Age 0
    Born on February 4, 1918.
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