Ingmar Bergman
Stage and film director
Ingmar Bergman
Ernst Ingmar Bergman was a Swedish director, writer and producer for film, stage and television. Described by Woody Allen as "probably the greatest film artist, all things considered, since the invention of the motion picture camera," he is recognized as one of the most accomplished and influential film directors of all time. He directed over sixty films and documentaries for cinematic release and for television, most of which he also wrote.
Biography
Ingmar Bergman's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Ingmar Bergman from around the web
The 100 Essential Directors Part 9: Victor Sjöström to Luchino Visconti - PopMatters
Google News - over 5 years
The Legend: Sjöström is arguably best known to today's cinephile crowd as an actor rather than a director, appearing in the key leading role of Isak Borg in Ingmar Bergman's melancholic masterpiece about aging, Wild Strawberries (1957),
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Book lover: Raymond Hawthorne - New Zealand Herald
Google News - over 5 years
The other, by film-maker and theatre director Ingmar Bergman, is The Magic Lantern. The book I'm reading right now is ... A biography of my old friend and mentor, Yvonne Rust: Maverick Spirit, by Theresa Sjoquist. In 1953, Yvonne came to Hastings High
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On Some Faraway Beach: Hynes at Fårö - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Reverse Shot's Eric Hynes was lucky to be selected for one of the sweetest gigs in the film-festival world: a trip to Sweden's remote, greatly uninhabited Fårö Island, where Ingmar Bergman lived for decades and died in 2007, for the annual
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A Journey Through The Eclipse Series: Ingmar Bergman's Thirst - CriterionCast.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Over the past week or so, I've had two significant preoccupations on my mind: first and foremost, the wedding this past Saturday of one of my sons, and second, Ingmar Bergman's 1960 film The Virgin Spring
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FREE FILM SCHOOL #10: Look, It's Gojira! - Crave Online
Google News - over 5 years
Professor Witney Seibold explains the history of Godzilla, and why this giant monster is just as important to film history as Ingmar Bergman. By Witney Seibold He pulls the spitting high-tension wires down. Scream, bug-eyed, as he looks in on them
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The film that changed my life: Matthew Macfadyen - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Bertil Guve as Alexander and Pernilla Allwin as Fanny in Ingmar Bergman's Fanny and Alexander. Photograph: c.Embassy/Everett / Rex Features It's hard to narrow it down because there are so many films – squillions of films – that have had a big impact
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'Fanny and Alexander Box Set' Planned for Blu-ray - High-Def Digest
Google News - over 5 years
The theatrical and extended television versions of Ingmar Bergman's powerful drama is planned for Blu-ray in November. In an early announcement to retailers, the Criterion Collection is working on 'Fanny and Alexander Box Set' for Blu-ray on November 8
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Jag Är Döden: A Look At Ingmar Bergman's Vision of Death, and Its Influence ... - Screened
Google News - over 5 years
I am talking, of course, of Ingmar Bergman's 1957 masterpiece, The Seventh Seal. Ostensibly, The Seventh Seal is a film about a pious, post-Crusades knight (Max von Sydow) and his cynical, more agnostic squire (Gunnar Björnstrand) journeying to the
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It's hard to top Ingmar Bergman - Orlando Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
The other day, after I watched Ingmar Bergman's "Through a Glass Darkly," the 1961 best-foreign-film Oscar winner, I brooded over my list of best movie directors of all time. Bergman is No. 1 because he and I are Swedish (!) and because of his writing,
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The almanac - UPI.com
Google News - over 5 years
... 38th president of the United States, in 1913; Swedish film director Ingmar Bergman in 1918; actors Dale Robertson in 1923 (age 88), Harry Dean Stanton in 1926 (age 85) and Polly Bergen in 1930 (age 81); TV news commentator John Chancellor in 1927;
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FREE FILM SCHOOL #4: Who the @#$% is Ingmar Bergman? - Crave Online
Google News - over 5 years
Today's lesson: Ingmar Bergman. Ingmar Bergman. The man's reputation precedes him, sometimes in unfortunate ways. When film neophytes and satirists attack foreign language films, they're usually referring to a vague combination of Federico Fellini's
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Letter surfaces from young Stanley Kubrick to Ingmar Bergman - Straight.com
Google News - over 5 years
A 1960 letter from Stanley Kubrick to Ingmar Bergman praising the Swede as the "greatest filmmaker at work today" has been posted at the Letters of Note website. As noted at the site, the younger maestro was 30 at the time, with Paths of Glory and The
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Ingmar Bergman's Fan Mail from Stanley Kubrick - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
With full credit going to the extraordinary website Letters of Note, we came across an incredible letter written by Stanley Kubrick to Ingmar Bergman in 1960. It's part of the Deutsche Kinemathek's
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In search of Ingmar Bergman - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Ingmar Bergman. Photograph: AP Did Ingmar Bergman ever watch Die Hard? It's a question I asked myself this Friday when I was browsing the great Swedish director's library. I was one of a number of journalists attending Bergman Week, a series of events
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Brutal 'Sacrifice' highlights Russian's last film - The Virginian-Pilot
Google News - over 5 years
It was his love and respect for director Ingmar Bergman that drew him there. Many of Bergman's films had been shot in Gotland, but Tarkovsky went even further, using Bergman's longtime cinematographer Sven Nykvist and choosing Erland Josephson,
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The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman: Sparks and Guy Maddin Get Saucy With the Swede - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman is as unique and wonderful as musical theatre gets: a "what-if" fictional fantasia plopping the celebrated (and moody) Swedish director smack-dab in the hot, sunny horrors of Hollywood, circa 1956
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The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman - LA Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
Well, The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman is a read-through for a movie of a radio opera," says director Guy Maddin, describing the June 25 LA Film Festival event at the Ford Amphitheatre, a theatrical/cinematic staging and musical performance of a
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The brothers Mael concoct 'The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman' - Los Angeles Times (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Sparks' Ron and Russell Mael bring a staged version of their radio drama 'The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman' to the Los Angeles Film Festival. High on any list of not-in-this-lifetime cinematic scenarios would be a movie musical starring Swedish auteur
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ingmar Bergman
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2007
    Age 88
    He died peacefully in his sleep, at his home on Fårö, on 30 July 2007, at the age of 89, the same day that another renowned film director, Michelangelo Antonioni, also died.
    More Details Hide Details
    He was buried in the cemetery of Fårö Church on 18 August 2007 in a private ceremony.
    More Details Hide Details A place in the Fårö churchyard was prepared for him under heavy secrecy. Although he was buried on the island of Fårö, his name and date of birth were inscribed under his wife’s name on a tomb at Roslagsbro churchyard, Norrtälje Municipality, several years before his death. When Bergman died, a large archive of notes was donated to the Swedish Film Institute. Among the notes are several unpublished and unfinished scripts both for stage and films, and many more ideas for works in different stages of development. A never performed play has the title Kärlek utan älskare ("Love without lovers"), and has the note "Complete disaster!" written on the envelope; the play is about a director who disappears and an editor who tries to complete a work he has left unfinished. Other canceled projects include the script for a pornographic film which Bergman abandoned since he did not think it was alive enough, a play about a cannibal, some loose scenes set inside a womb, a film about the life of Jesus, a film about The Merry Widow, and a play with the title Från sperm till spöke ("From sperm to spook"). The Swedish director Marcus Lindeen went through the material, and inspired by Kärlek utan älskare he took samples from many of the works and turned them into a play, titled Arkivet för orealiserbara drömmar och visioner ("The archive for unrealisable dreams and visions").
  • 2006
    Age 87
    He had hip surgery in October 2006 and was making a difficult recovery.
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  • 2003
    Age 84
    Bergman retired from filmmaking in December 2003.
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  • 1984
    Age 65
    Still, he remained in Munich until 1984.
    More Details Hide Details In one of the last major interviews with Bergman, conducted in 2005 at Fårö Island, Bergman said that despite being active during the exile, he had effectively lost eight years of his professional life.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1978
    Age 59
    Although he continued to operate from Munich, by mid-1978 Bergman had overcome some of his bitterness toward the government of Sweden.
    More Details Hide Details In July of that year he visited Sweden, celebrating his sixtieth birthday at Fårö, and partly resumed his work as a director at Royal Dramatic Theatre. To honour his return, the Swedish Film Institute launched a new Ingmar Bergman Prize to be awarded annually for excellence in filmmaking.
  • 1976
    Age 57
    On 23 March 1976, the special prosecutor Anders Nordenadler dropped the charges against Bergman, saying that the alleged crime had no legal basis, saying it would be like bringing "charges against a person who has stolen his own car, thinking it was someone else’s".
    More Details Hide Details Director General Gösta Ekman, chief of the Swedish Internal Revenue Service, defended the failed investigation, saying that the investigation was dealing with important legal material and that Bergman was treated just like any other suspect. He expressed regret that Bergman had left the country, hoping that Bergman was a "stronger" person now when the investigation had shown that he had not done any wrong. Even though the charges were dropped, Bergman became disconsolate, fearing he would never again return to directing. Despite pleas by the Swedish prime minister Olof Palme, high public figures, and leaders of the film industry, he vowed never to work again in Sweden. He closed down his studio on the island of Fårö, suspended two announced film projects, and went into self-imposed exile in Munich, Germany. Harry Schein, director of the Swedish Film Institute, estimated the immediate damage as ten million SEK (kronor) and hundreds of jobs lost.
    On 30 January 1976, while rehearsing August Strindberg’s Dance of Death at the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm, he was arrested by two plainclothes police officers and charged with income tax evasion.
    More Details Hide Details The impact of the event on Bergman was devastating. He suffered a nervous break-down as a result of the humiliation and was hospitalized in a state of deep depression.
  • 1974
    Age 55
    Bergman dissolved Persona in 1974 after having been notified by the Swedish Central Bank and subsequently reported the income.
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  • 1971
    Age 52
    In 1971, Bergman received the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award at the Academy Awards ceremony.
    More Details Hide Details Three of his films won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The list of his nominations and awards follows: Bibliographies
  • 1970
    Age 51
    The investigation was focused on an alleged 1970 transaction of 500,000 Swedish kronor (SEK) between Bergman’s Swedish company Cinematograf and its Swiss subsidiary Persona, an entity that was mainly used for the paying of salaries to foreign actors.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1960
    Age 41
    He was the director of the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm from 1960 to 1966 and manager from 1963 to 1966, where he began a long-time collaboration with choreographer Donya Feuer.
    More Details Hide Details After Bergman left Sweden because of the tax evasion incident, he became director of the Residenz Theatre of Munich, Germany (1977–84). He remained active in theatre throughout the 1990s and made his final production on stage with Henrik Ibsen’s The Wild Duck at the Royal Dramatic Theatre in 2002. A complete list of Bergman’s work in theatre can be found under "Stage Productions and Radio Theatre Credits" at Ingmar Bergman filmography.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1953
    Age 34
    He became director of the Malmö city theatre in 1953 and remained for seven years.
    More Details Hide Details Many of his star actors were people with whom he began working on stage, and a number of people in the "Bergman troupe" of his 1960s films came from Malmö’s city theatre (Max von Sydow, for example).
    Bergman began working with Sven Nykvist, his cinematographer, in 1953.
    More Details Hide Details The two developed and maintained a working relationship of sufficient rapport to allow Bergman not to worry about the composition of a shot until the day before it was filmed. On the morning of the shoot, he would briefly speak to Nykvist about the mood and composition he hoped for, and then leave Nykvist to work, lacking interruption or comment until post-production discussion of the next day’s work. By Bergman’s own account, he never had a problem with funding. He cited two reasons for this: one, that he did not live in the United States, which he viewed as obsessed with box-office earnings; and two, that his films tended to be low-budget affairs. (Cries and Whispers, for instance, was finished for about $450,000, while Scenes from a Marriage, a six-episode television feature, cost only $200,000.) Bergman usually wrote his own screenplays, thinking about them for months or years before starting the actual process of writing, which he viewed as somewhat tedious. His earlier films are carefully constructed and are either based on his plays or written in collaboration with other authors. Bergman stated that in his later works, when on occasion his actors would want to do things differently from his own intention, he would let them, noting that the results were often "disastrous" when he did not do so. As his career progressed, Bergman increasingly let his actors improvise their dialogue.
  • 1949
    Age 30
    During the next ten years, he wrote and directed more than a dozen films including The Devil’s Wanton/Prison (Fängelse) in 1949 as well as The Naked Night/Sawdust and Tinsel (Gycklarnas afton) and Summer with Monika (Sommaren med Monika), both from 1953.
    More Details Hide Details Bergman first achieved worldwide success with Smiles of a Summer Night (Sommarnattens leende) (1955), which won for "Best poetic humour" and was nominated for the Palme d’Or at Cannes the following year. This was followed by The Seventh Seal (Det sjunde inseglet) and Wild Strawberries (Smultronstället), released in Sweden ten months apart in 1957. The Seventh Seal won a special jury prize and was nominated for the Palme d'Or at Cannes and Wild Strawberries won numerous awards for Bergman and its star, Victor Sjöström. Bergman continued to be productive for the next two decades. From the early 1960s, he spent much of his life on the Swedish island of Fårö, where he made several films. In the early 1960s he directed three films that explored the theme of faith and doubt in God, Through a Glass Darkly (Såsom i en Spegel, 1961), Winter Light (Nattvardsgästerna, 1962), and The Silence (Tystnaden, 1963). Critics created the notion that the common themes in these three films made them a trilogy or cinematic triptych. Bergman initially responded that he did not plan these three films as a trilogy and that he could not see any common motifs in them, but he later seemed to have adopted the notion, with some equivocation. In 1964 he made a parody of Fellini with All These Women (För att inte tala om alla dessa kvinnor).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1943
    Age 24
    He married Else Fisher in 1943.
    More Details Hide Details Bergman’s film career began in 1941 with his work rewriting scripts, but his first major accomplishment was in 1944 when he wrote the screenplay for Torment/Frenzy (Hets), a film directed by Alf Sjöberg. Along with writing the screenplay, he was also appointed assistant director of the film. In his second autobiographical book, Images: My Life in Film, Bergman describes the filming of the exteriors as his actual film directorial debut. The international success of this film led to Bergman’s first opportunity to direct a year later.
  • 1942
    Age 23
    In 1942 he was given the chance to direct one of his own scripts, Caspar’s Death.
    More Details Hide Details The play was seen by members of Svensk Filmindustri, which then offered Bergman a position working on scripts.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1937
    Age 18
    In 1937 he entered Stockholm University College (later renamed Stockholm University) to study art and literature.
    More Details Hide Details He spent most of his time involved in student theatre and became a "genuine movie addict". At the same time, a romantic involvement led to a break with his father that lasted for years. Although he did not graduate, he wrote a number of plays and an opera, and became an assistant director at a theatre.
  • 1934
    Age 15
    In 1934, aged 16, he was sent to Germany to spend the summer vacation with family friends.
    More Details Hide Details He attended a Nazi rally in Weimar at which he saw Adolf Hitler. He later wrote in Laterna Magica (The Magic Lantern) about the visit to Germany, describing how the German family had put a portrait of Adolf Hitler on the wall by his bed, and that "for many years, I was on Hitler's side, delighted by his success and saddened by his defeats". Bergman commented that "Hitler was unbelievably charismatic. He electrified the crowd.... The Nazism I had seen seemed fun and youthful". Bergman did two five-month stretches of mandatory military service.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1918
    Born
    Born in 1918.
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