Ingrid Bergman
Actress
Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman was a Swedish actress who starred in a variety of European and American films. She won three Academy Awards, two Emmy Awards, and the Tony Award for Best Actress. She is ranked as the fourth greatest female star of American cinema of all time by the American Film Institute.
Biography
Ingrid Bergman's personal information overview.
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Today In History - Sports Radio ESPN 1420
Google News - over 5 years
In 1982, actress Ingrid Bergman died at the age of 67. She starred in several classic films during her career including "Casablanca" and "Murder on the Orient Express." In 1987, Oscar-winning actor Lee Marvin died at the age of 63
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Seven things to do this week, Aug. 28-Sept. 3 - The Journal News | LoHud.com
Google News - over 5 years
"Casablanca," starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, is one of Steven Spielberg's favorite films and will screen as part of a tribute to the filmmaker at the Jacob Burns Film Center in Pleasantville. The series of screenings begins on Sept
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Breathing in the magic of Morocco - Inquirer.net
Google News - over 5 years
The best known city is Casablanca, setting of the vintage romantic film of the same title starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, although none of the scenes was ever shot there. We had long been fascinated by Morocco, first because we knew
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Celebrities and their cars - Stuff.co.nz
Google News - over 5 years
The beautiful Ingrid Bergman had just that honour in 1954. The Swedish actress became a huge international star after appearing with Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca in 1942. A few years later, while making a film in Europe, she fell in love with Italian
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Wears It Well: Dita Von Teese - Socialite Life
Google News - over 5 years
'Twasn't Ava Gardner, nor was it Ingrid Bergman. The alluring figure, clad in a floral print retro dress and pair of lime Christian Louboutins was burlesque queen Dita Von Teese. I ADORE the magenta headband
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Poster notes: The Skin I Live In - The Guardian (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
As for the Warhol influence, Gatti's poster for Volver, with its bright, non-realist blocks of colour, recalls the Pittsburgh artist's famous portraits of Marilyn Monroe, Jackie Kennedy, and Ingrid Bergman, particularly in the composition,
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“FROM SAINT TO WHORE” THE INGRID BERGMAN CHEATING SCANDAL - The National Enquirer
Google News - over 5 years
Hollywood legend CASABALANCA star INGRID BERGMAN was denounced in Congress as a “free-love cultist” when she abandoned her husband and kids to run off with an Italian playboy moviemaker
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Salvatore Ferragamo will host first online luxury trunk show - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Elettra Rossellini Wiedemann, granddaughter of Ingrid Bergman and a longtime friend and client of Salvatore Ferragamo, will model the fall and winter runways looks for the trunk show. “I absolutely loved being a part of the Fall 2011 Ferragamo look
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A fine romance - The Daily News Online
Google News - over 5 years
Actors Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman stand next to a piano in Rick's Cafe as actor Dooley Wilson, cast as Sam the pianist, plays the timeless tune, “As Time Goes By,” written by Harold Hupfeld. It's from the scene in the movie where Rick,
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Atlanta Symphony teams up with Bogie at Verizon - NorthFulton.com
Google News - over 5 years
Regarded by many as one of the screen's greatest romances of all time, the film set in World War II Morocco, stars Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman with stellar supporting roles played by Paul Henreid, Claude Raines, Sydney Greenstreet and Peter
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Kate's take on Mildred Pierce - The Australian
Google News - over 5 years
As the 1946 Oscars approached, Crawford's rivals - the beloved Ingrid Bergman, Jennifer Jones and Gene Tierney - were all better liked. They had starred that year in happy, optimistic post-war films. Crawford was in a Depression-era glumfest called
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Bogey and Bergman Entertain at the Adobe - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
... chairs and laying out picnic blankets in the courtyard of Reyes Adobe Historical Site & Park at about 7 pm Saturday to watch Casablanca, the classic love story about a man torn between love and virtue, starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman
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'90210': 'Privileged' Star Books Recurring Role (Exclusive) - Hollywood Reporter
Google News - over 5 years
Her character is described as a quiet beauty torn by guilt -- between obligation and desire -- in the vein of Ingrid Bergman in Casablanca. At the end of Season 3 Liam and Annie (Shenae Grimes) seemingly parted ways as the kids from West Beverly High
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Exclusive extract from 'My Dolce Vita: A Memoir' - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
Celebrities poured in: Ingrid Bergman, Audrey Hepburn, Ava Gardner, Greta Garbo, Vivien Leigh, Joan Fontaine, Elizabeth Taylor, Greer Garson, Lana Turner and many more. Robert Taylor arrived with one wife, Barbara Stanwyck, had an affair with an
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Dave Newhouse: Oakland film director anxious to 'roll' - San Jose Mercury News
Google News - over 5 years
But unlike Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in "Casablanca," Julien is longing to return to Paris -- to finish his latest, and biggest, film project. There's just one holdup. Julien is currently waiting on investments at his Oakland hills home in
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Cary Grant's daughter Jennifer to speak at Society of the Four Arts about her ... - Palm Beach Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
Jennifer Grant will appear Wednesday at The Society of the Four Arts. By Jan Sjostrom What woman hasn't imagined herself playing opposite Cary Grant, perhaps stepping into the shoes of Ingrid Bergman in Notorious, Audrey Hepburn in Charade or Katharine
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ingrid Bergman
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1982
    Age 66
    Bergman died in 1982 on her 67th birthday in London, of breast cancer.
    More Details Hide Details Her body was cremated at Kensal Green Cemetery, London, and her ashes taken to Sweden. Most of them were scattered in the sea around the islet of Dannholmen off the fishing village of Fjällbacka in Bohuslän, on the west coast of Sweden, where she spent most of the summers from 1958 until her death in 1982. The rest were placed next to her parents' ashes in Norra Begravningsplatsen (Northern Cemetery), Stockholm, Sweden. According to biographer Donald Spoto, she was "arguably the most international star in the history of entertainment." After her American film debut in the film Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939), co-starring Leslie Howard, Hollywood saw her as a unique actress who was completely natural in style and without need of makeup. Film critic James Agee wrote that she "not only bears a startling resemblance to an imaginable human being; she really knows how to act, in a blend of poetic grace with quiet realism."
  • 1980
    Age 64
    In 1980, Bergman's autobiography was published under the title Ingrid Bergman: My Story.
    More Details Hide Details It was written with the help of Alan Burgess, and in it she discusses her childhood, her early career, her life during her time in Hollywood, the Rossellini scandal, and subsequent events. The book was written after her children warned her that she would only be known through rumors and interviews if she did not tell her own story. It was through this autobiography that her affair with Robert Capa became known. Full Article: List of awards and nominations received by Ingrid Bergman Bergman won three Academy Awards for acting, two for Best Actress and one for Best Supporting Actress. She ranks tied for second place in terms of Oscars won, with Walter Brennan (all three for Best Supporting Actor), Jack Nicholson (two for Best Actor and one for Best Supporting Actor), Meryl Streep (two for Best Actress and one for Best Supporting Actress), and Daniel Day-Lewis (all three for Best Actor). Katharine Hepburn still holds the record with four (all for Best Actress).
  • 1979
    Age 63
    In 1979, Bergman hosted the AFI's Life Achievement Award Ceremony for Alfred Hitchcock.
    More Details Hide Details She was offered the starring role in a television mini-series, A Woman Called Golda (1982), about the late Israeli prime minister Golda Meir. It was to be her final acting role and she was honored posthumously with a second Emmy Award for Best Actress. Her daughter, Isabella, described Bergman's surprise at being offered the part and the producer trying to explain to her, "People believe you and trust you, and this is what I want, because Golda Meir had the trust of the people." Isabella adds, "Now that was interesting to Mother." She was also persuaded that Golda was a "grand-scale person," one that people would assume was much taller than she actually was. Chandler notes that the role "also had a special significance for her, as during World War II, Ingrid felt guilty because she had so misjudged the situation in Germany."
  • 1978
    Age 62
    In 1978, Bergman played in Ingmar Bergman's Autumn Sonata (Höstsonaten) for which she received her 7th Academy Award nomination.
    More Details Hide Details This was her final performance on the big screen. In the film, Bergman plays a celebrity pianist who travels to Norway to visit her neglected daughter, played by Liv Ullmann. The film was shot in Norway.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1973
    Age 57
    Bergman was the President of the Jury at the 1973 Cannes Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details Bergman became one of the few actresses ever to receive three Oscars when she won her third (and first in the category of Best Supporting Actress) for her performance in Murder on the Orient Express (1974). Director Sidney Lumet offered Bergman the important part of Princess Dragomiroff, with which he felt she could win an Oscar. She insisted on playing the much smaller role of Greta Ohlsson, the old Swedish missionary. Lumet discussed Bergman's role: Bergman could speak Swedish (her native language), German (her second language, learned from her German mother and in school), English (learned when brought over to the United States), Italian (learned while living in Italy) and French (her third language, learned in school). She acted in each of these languages at various times. Fellow actor John Gielgud, who had acted with her in Murder on the Orient Express and who had directed her in the play The Constant Wife, playfully commented: "She speaks five languages and can't act in any of them." (This is from a Dorothy Parker quote which became a snowclone, "That woman speaks eighteen languages, and can't say 'No' in any of them.")
  • 1972
    Age 56
    In 1972, U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy entered an apology into the Congressional Record for the attack made on Bergman 22 years earlier by Edwin C. Johnson.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1958
    Age 42
    During this time, she performed in several stage plays. She married producer Lars Schmidt, a fellow Swede, on 21 December 1958. This marriage ended in divorce in 1975.
    More Details Hide Details Schmidt died on 18 October 2009. After a long hiatus, Bergman made the film Cactus Flower (1969), with Walter Matthau and Goldie Hawn.
    Bergman made her first post-scandal public appearance in Hollywood in the 1958 Academy Awards, when she was the presenter of the Academy Award for Best Picture.
    More Details Hide Details She was given a standing ovation after being introduced by Cary Grant as she walked out onto the stage to present the award. She continued to alternate between performances in American and European films for the rest of her career and also made occasional appearances in television dramas such as The Turn of the Screw (1959) for the Ford Startime TV series—for which she won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress.
  • 1957
    Age 41
    In 1957 she divorced Rossellini. The next year she married Lars Schmidt, a theatrical entrepreneur from a wealthy Swedish shipping family. That marriage lasted nearly two decades, until 1975 when they divorced.
    More Details Hide Details During her marriage with Lindström, Bergman had a brief affair with Spellbound costar Gregory Peck. Unlike the affair with Rossellini, that with Peck was kept private until he confessed it to Brad Darrach of People in an interview five years after Bergman's death. Peck said, “All I can say is that I had a real love for her (Bergman), and I think that’s where I ought to stop…. I was young. She was young. We were involved for weeks in close and intense work.”
  • 1956
    Age 40
    With her starring role in 1956's Anastasia (1956), Bergman made a triumphant return to the American screen and won the Academy Award for Best Actress for a second time.
    More Details Hide Details Its director, Anatole Litvak, described her as "one of the greatest actresses in the world." He also offered his description of her at the time:
  • THIRTIES
  • 1953
    Age 37
    Rossellini directed her in a brief segment of his 1953 documentary film, Siamo donne (We, the Women), which was devoted to film actresses.
    More Details Hide Details His biographer Peter Bondanella notes that problems with communication during their marriage may have inspired his films' central themes of "solitude, grace and spirituality in a world without moral values." Rossellini's use of a Hollywood star in his typically "neorealist" films, in which he normally used non-professional actors, did provoke some negative reactions in certain circles. In Bergman's first film with Rossellini, her character was "defying audience expectations" in that the director preferred to work without a script, forcing Bergman to act "inspired by reality while she worked, a style which Bondanella calls 'a new cinema of psychological introspection'". Bergman was aware of Rossellini's directing style before filming, as the director had earlier written to her explaining that he worked from "a few basic ideas, developing them little by little" as a film progressed. After separating from Rossellini, Bergman starred in Jean Renoir's Elena and Her Men (Elena et les Hommes, 1956), a romantic comedy in which she played a Polish princess caught up in political intrigue. Although the film was not a success, her performance in it has since come to be regarded as one of her best.
  • 1952
    Age 36
    On 18 June 1952 she gave birth to the twin daughters Isotta Ingrid Rossellini and Isabella Rossellini.
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  • 1950
    Age 34
    Bergman returned to Europe after the scandalous publicity surrounding her affair with Italian director Roberto Rossellini during the filming of Stromboli in 1950.
    More Details Hide Details In the same month the film was released, she gave birth to a boy, Roberto Ingmar Rossellini (born 2 February 1950). A week after her son was born, she divorced Lindström and married Rossellini in Mexico.
    As a result of the scandal, Bergman returned to Italy, leaving her husband and daughter (Pia). She went through a publicized divorce and custody battle for their daughter. Bergman and Rossellini were married on 24 May 1950.
    More Details Hide Details In addition to Renato, they had twin daughters (born 18 June 1952): Isabella Rossellini, who became an actress and model, and Isotta Ingrid Rossellini, who became a professor of Italian literature.
  • 1949
    Age 33
    Rossellini completed five films starring Bergman between 1949 and 1955: Stromboli, Europa '51, Viaggio in Italia, Giovanna d'Arco al rogo, and La Paura (Fear).
    More Details Hide Details
    Bergman strongly admired two films by Italian director Roberto Rossellini that she had seen in the United States. In 1949, Bergman wrote to Rossellini, expressing this admiration and suggesting that she make a film with him.
    More Details Hide Details This led to her being cast in his film Stromboli (1950). During production, Bergman fell in love with Rossellini, and they began an affair. Bergman became pregnant with their son, Renato Roberto Ranaldo Giusto Giuseppe ("Robin") Rossellini (born 2 February 1950). This affair caused a huge scandal in the United States, where it led to Bergman being denounced on the floor of the United States Senate. Ed Sullivan chose not to have her on his show, despite a poll indicating that the public wanted her to appear. However, Steve Allen, whose show was equally popular, did have her as a guest, later explaining "the danger of trying to judge artistic activity through the prism of one's personal life." Spoto notes that Bergman had, by virtue of her roles and screen persona, placed herself "above all that." She had played a nun in The Bells of St. Mary's (1945) and a virgin saint in Joan of Arc (1948). Bergman later said, "People saw me in Joan of Arc and declared me a saint. I'm not. I'm just a woman, another human being."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1939
    Age 23
    She arrived in Los Angeles on 6 May 1939, and stayed at the Selznick home until she could find another residence.
    More Details Hide Details According to Selznick's son, Danny, who was a child at the time, his father had a few concerns about Ingrid: "She didn't speak English, she was too tall, her name sounded too German, and her eyebrows were too thick." Bergman was soon accepted without having to modify her looks or name, despite some early suggestions by Selznick. "He let her have her way," notes a story in Life magazine. Selznick understood her fear of Hollywood make-up artists, who might turn her into someone she wouldn't recognize, and "instructed them to lay off". He was also aware that her natural good looks would compete successfully with Hollywood's "synthetic razzle-dazzle". During the following weeks, while Intermezzo was being filmed, Selznick was also filming Gone with the Wind. In a letter to William Hebert, his publicity director, Selznick described a few of his early impressions of Bergman:
  • 1937
    Age 21
    In 1937, at the age of 21, Bergman married dentist Petter Aron Lindström (later to become a neurosurgeon); the couple had a daughter, Friedel Pia Lindström (born 20 September 1938).
    More Details Hide Details After returning to the United States in 1940, she acted on Broadway before continuing to do films in Hollywood. The following year, her husband arrived from Sweden with daughter Pia. Lindström stayed in Rochester, New York, where he studied medicine and surgery at the University of Rochester. Bergman would travel to New York and stay at their small rented stucco house between films, her visits lasting from a few days to four months. According to an article in Life magazine, the "doctor regards himself as the undisputed head of the family, an idea that Ingrid accepts cheerfully." He insisted she draw the line between her film and personal life, as he has a "professional dislike for being associated with the tinseled glamor of Hollywood." Lindström later moved to San Francisco, California, where he completed his internship at a private hospital, and they continued to spend time together when she could travel between filming.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1935
    Age 19
    During her first summer break, she was also hired by a Swedish film studio, which led to her leaving the Royal Dramatic Theatre after just one year, to work in films full-time. Her first film role after leaving the Royal Dramatic Theatre was a small part in 1935's Munkbrogreven (although she had previously been an extra in the 1932 film Landskamp).
    More Details Hide Details She went on to act in a dozen films in Sweden, including En kvinnas ansikte, which was later remade as A Woman's Face with Joan Crawford, and one film in Germany, Die vier Gesellen (The Four Companions) (1938). Bergman's first acting role in the United States came when Hollywood producer David O. Selznick brought her to America to star in Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939), an English language remake of her earlier Swedish film Intermezzo (1936). Unable to speak English and uncertain about her acceptance by the American audience, she expected to complete this one film and return home to Sweden. Her husband, Dr. Petter Lindström, remained in Sweden with their daughter Pia (born 1938). In Intermezzo, she played the role of a young piano accompanist opposite Leslie Howard as a famous violin virtuoso.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1915
    Born
    Bergman, named after Princess Ingrid of Sweden, was born on 29 August 1915 in Stockholm, to a Swedish father, Justus Bergman, and his German wife, Frieda (née Adler) Bergman.
    More Details Hide Details When she was two years old, her mother died. Her father, who was an artist and photographer, died when she was 13. In the years before he died, he wanted her to become an opera star, and had her take voice lessons for three years. But she always "knew from the beginning that she wanted to be an actress," sometimes wearing her mother's clothes and staging plays in her father's empty studio. Her father documented all her birthdays with a borrowed camera. After his death, she was sent to live with an aunt, who died of heart disease only six months later. She then moved in with her Aunt Hulda and Uncle Otto, who had five children. Another aunt she visited, Elsa Adler, first told Ingrid, when she was 11, that her mother may have had "some Jewish blood," and that her father was aware of that fact long before they married. But her aunt also cautioned her about telling others about her possible ancestry as "there might be some difficult times coming". Biographer Aleksandra Ziolkowska-Boehm, however, notes that the claim of Jewish blood was likely an embellishment. After being forced to do an in-depth genealogical investigation, Bergman's maternal cousin found there to be no Jewish ancestry on Bergman's mother's side.
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