J. Edgar Hoover
FBI director
J. Edgar Hoover
John Edgar Hoover KBE was the first Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) of the United States. Appointed director of the Bureau of Investigation—predecessor to the FBI—in 1924, he was instrumental in founding the FBI in 1935, where he remained director until his death in 1972.
Biography
J. Edgar Hoover's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of J. Edgar Hoover
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for J. Edgar Hoover
Show More Show Less
News
News abour J. Edgar Hoover from around the web
MCC Chancellor Mark James Receives ATF National Award - PR Newswire (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
... Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Citizenship Award by ATF Acting Director Kenneth E. Melson and Acting Deputy Director William J. Hoover at ATF's 15th Annual Awards Ceremony in Washington, DC The event honored ATF agents and employees,
Article Link:
Google News article
Man shot to death in Apopka - MyFoxOrlando.com
Google News - over 5 years
When deputies arrived they found 44-year-old Harry J. Hoover dead with a single gunshot wound. Anyone with information about this crime is asked to contact Crimeline at 1-800-423-TIPS or the Sheriff's Office at 407-655-6650
Article Link:
Google News article
Leonardo Dicaprio : J. Edgar, premières photos de son film - melty.fr
Google News - over 5 years
Clint Eastwood a résumé J. Hoover de la façon suivante : "Ayant été le visage de l'agent du maintien de l'ordre aux Etats-Unis pendant presque 50 ans, J. Edgar Hoover était craint et admiré, injurié et révéré. Mais derrière à huis-clos, il gardait des
Article Link:
Google News article
J. Edgar: Leonardo Di Caprio sul set di Clint Eastwood - Cinema10
Google News - over 5 years
A pubblicarla è stata l'Entertainment Weekly che ha ben pensato di mostrare in anteprima l'attore hollywoodiano nelle vesti del capo dell'Fbi Edgar J. Hoover. Così tolte le vesti di Dominic Cobb di Inception, ecco Leonardo Di Caprio entrare nei panni
Article Link:
Google News article
Le top 30 des stars montantes les plus sexy - Jeux Actu CINEMA
Google News - over 5 years
... War Horse de Steven Spielberg, Great Expectations et Now is good. 29 - Saoirse Ronan, vue dans Orgueils et préjugés, Lovely Bones, Hanna, bientôt dans Anna Karenina. 30 - Armie Hammer - vu dans The Social Network, bientôt dans J. Hoover, Blanche Neige
Article Link:
Google News article
Property transfers for Aug. 6 - Canton Repository
Google News - over 5 years
Allison R. Barnhart from Samuel J. Hoover Jr., 815 Lincoln Way W, $33900. Curtis R. Graham and Carol L. Graham from John E. and Mary K. Weider, 2002 Ironwood Circle NE, $120000. Cole AA Massillon OH LLC from Massillon Realty LLC, 1232 Lincoln Way E,
Article Link:
Google News article
Matter of Record (Aug. 4) - Times Record News
Google News - over 5 years
William J. Hoover, et ux, to Donnie B. Park, Trustee, First Bank, L31, B2 of the Stone Lake Addition, Phase 5, aka 1710 Woodridge Dr., $165000.00, V3635 P671. David Farris to Larry R. Johnson, Trustee, First Bank & Trust of Childress, L19,
Article Link:
Google News article
Open Letter to ATF Director Melson Regarding Expanding Tampa-Honduras ... - AmmoLand.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
J.Hoover@usdoj.gov), and Arthur Herbert (Arthur.W.Herbert@usdoj.gov) — in the past 24 hours David Codrea and I have broken two stories regarding alleged “gunwalking” on the part of Special Agent in Charge of ATF's Tampa Field Division Virginia O'Brien
Article Link:
Google News article
Historias de horror - ElEspectador.com
Google News - over 5 years
... su mejor amigo y colaborador, Aaron Hotchner, propuso que el factor decisivo en la decisión de Hemingway de quitarse la vida había sido la insoportable ansiedad causada por la persecución de la que fue objeto por parte del FBI de Edgar J. Hoover
Article Link:
Google News article
Giba Stein - Terceiro Tempo
Google News - over 5 years
Em Toronto, Canadá, em 1986, Giba Stein, eu e Jack Leon Terpins vimos juntos a final do torneio de tênis entre as duplas Boris Becker e Slobodan Zivojinovic e Mick Leach e J. Hoover. Os americanos venceram de virada. No dia 3 de julho de 2011,
Article Link:
Google News article
Keith Lee - Record Delta
Google News - over 5 years
Friends will be received at the Heavner & Cutright Funeral Chapel today, Wednesday, June 29, 2011, from 5-8 pm Funeral services will be held on Thursday, June 30, 2011, at 11 am, at the Good Hope Tabernacle Church with Pastor Holly J. Hoover
Article Link:
Google News article
DiCaprio pressenti pour un remake de «Une Etoile est née» - Le Parisien
Google News - over 5 years
Le réalisateur, qui a récemment dirigé DiCaprio dans «Edgar J. », un biopic sur le patron très controversé du FBI, Edgar J. Hoover, souhaiterait que l'acteur de «Titanic» et «Inception» soit le partenaire de Beyoncé, choisie voici déjà six mois pour
Article Link:
Google News article
More Shakeups at ATF - ticklethewire.com
Google News - over 5 years
... who has been nominated for the permanent spot. Traver met Tuesday afternoon with Attorney Gen. Eric Holder Jr. On top of that change, some think it's just a matter of time before the second in command, William J. Hoover, is replaced
Article Link:
Google News article
Top Agency Officials Knew of Disputed Gun Program - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
The acting director of ATF, Kenneth E. Melson, and his acting deputy, William J. Hoover, were “keenly interested” in the operation and received weekly updates on its progress, according to internal e-mails released for the first time by the Oversight
Article Link:
Google News article
In Dover, graduation 'not an end or a beginning' - York Daily Record
Google News - over 5 years
... Brittany R. Hartzler, Weston M. Hatch, Kirsten L. Heath, Bradley J. Hege, Tyler S. Henning, Madelyn M. Herman, Melanie S. Herrera, Larissa A. Hinkle, Zachary P. Hivner, Drew R. Holtzapple, Christopher J. Hoover, Ryan D. Hoover, Taylor L. Howell,
Article Link:
Google News article
E-town books graduation at LCBC - Lancaster Newspapers
Google News - over 5 years
... Amy L. Hernandez, Nathaniel Stephen Herr, Hannah Marie Hess, Samantha Lynn Hicks, Patrick Alan Hinson, Kenneth R. Hippensteel, Jessica Nichole Hoffard, John Douglas Hoffer, Cameron Aaron Hoover, Matthew J. Hoover, Sara A. Hoover, Marisa Lea Hopp,
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of J. Edgar Hoover
    CHILDHOOD
  • 1972
    Hoover remained director of the FBI until he died in his Washington home of a heart attack, on May 2, 1972.
    More Details Hide Details His body lay in state in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol, where Chief Justice Warren Burger eulogized him. President Richard Nixon delivered another eulogy at the funeral service in the National Presbyterian Church, and called Hoover "one of the giants. His long life brimmed over with magnificent achievement and dedicated service to this country which he loved so well." Hoover was buried in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C., next to the graves of his parents and a sister who died in infancy. Operational command of the Bureau passed to Associate Director Clyde Tolson. On May 3, Nixon appointed L. Patrick Gray, a Justice Department official with no FBI experience, as Acting Director, with W. Mark Felt remaining as Associate Director. Biographer Kenneth D. Ackerman notes: "For better or worse, he built the FBI into a modern, national organization stressing professionalism and scientific crime-fighting. For most of his life, Americans considered him a hero. He made the G-Man brand so popular that, at its height, it was harder to become an FBI agent than to be accepted into an Ivy League college."
  • 1969
    When Richard Nixon took office in January 1969, Hoover had just turned 74.
    More Details Hide Details There was a growing sentiment in Washington, DC that the aging FBI chief needed to go, but Hoover's power and friends in Congress remained too strong for him to be forced into retirement. Hoover received his first dog from his parents when he was a child, after which he was never without one. He owned many throughout his lifetime and became an aficionado especially knowledgeable in fine breeding of pedigrees, particularly Cairn Terriers and Beagles. He gave away many dogs to notable people, such as Presidents Herbert Hoover (no relation) and Lyndon B. Johnson, and buried seven canine pets, including a Cairn Terrier named Spee De Bozo, at Aspen Hill Memorial Park, in Silver Spring, Maryland.
  • OTHER
  • 1964
    In 1964, Hoover's FBI investigated Jack Valenti, a special assistant and confidant of President Lyndon Johnson's.
    More Details Hide Details Despite Valenti's two-year marriage to Johnson's personal secretary, the investigation focused on rumors that he was having a gay relationship with a commercial photographer friend.
    Hoover personally directed the FBI investigation of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. In 1964, just days before Hoover testified in the earliest stages of the Warren Commission hearings, President Lyndon B. Johnson waived the then-mandatory U.S. Government Service Retirement Age of 70, allowing Hoover to remain the FBI Director "for an indefinite period of time."
    More Details Hide Details The House Select Committee on Assassinations issued a report in 1979 critical of the performance by the FBI, the Warren Commission, and other agencies. The report also criticized what it characterized as the FBI's reluctance to thoroughly investigate the possibility of a conspiracy to assassinate the President. Presidents Harry S Truman and John F. Kennedy each considered dismissing Hoover as FBI Director, but ultimately concluded that the political cost of doing so would be too great.
  • 1956
    In 1956, several years before he targeted King, Hoover had a public showdown with T. R. M. Howard, a civil rights leader from Mound Bayou, Mississippi.
    More Details Hide Details During a national speaking tour, Howard had criticized the FBI's failure to thoroughly investigate the racially motivated murders of George W. Lee, Lamar Smith, and Emmett Till. Hoover wrote an open letter to the press singling out these statements as "irresponsible". While Hoover had fought bank-robbing gangsters in the 1930s, anti-communism was a bigger focus for him after World War II, as the cold war developed. During the 1940s through mid-1950s, he seemed to ignore organized crime of the type that ran vice rackets such as drugs, prostitution, and extortion. He denied that any Mafia operated in the U.S. In the 1950s, evidence of Hoover's unwillingness to focus FBI resources on the Mafia became grist for the media and his many detractors. The Apalachin Meeting of late 1957 embarrassed the FBI by proving on newspaper front pages that a nationwide Mafia syndicate thrived unimpeded by the nation's "top cops". Hoover immediately changed tack, and during the next five years, the FBI investigated organized crime heavily. Its concentration on the topic fluctuated in subsequent decades, but it never again merely ignored this category of crime.
    In 1956, Hoover was becoming increasingly frustrated by U.S. Supreme Court decisions that limited the Justice Department's ability to prosecute people for their political opinions, most notably communists. Some of his aides reported that he purposely exaggerated the threat of communism to "ensure financial and public support for the FBI." At this time he formalized a covert "dirty tricks" program under the name COINTELPRO. This program remained in place until it was revealed to the public in 1971, after the theft of many internal documents from an office in Media, Pennsylvania, and COINTELPRO became the cause of some of the harshest criticism of Hoover and the FBI.
    More Details Hide Details COINTELPRO was first used to disrupt the Communist Party USA, where Hoover went after targets that ranged from suspected everyday spies to larger celebrity figures such as Charlie Chaplin, he saw as spreading Communist Party propaganda, and later organizations such as the Black Panther Party, Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and others. COINTELPRO's methods included infiltration, burglaries, illegal wiretaps, planting forged documents, and spreading false rumors about key members of target organizations. Some authors have charged that COINTELPRO methods also included inciting violence and arranging murders. In 1975, COINTELPRO's activities were investigated by the United States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities, called the "Church Committee" after its chairman, Senator Frank Church (D-Idaho); the committee declared COINTELPRO's activities were illegal and contrary to the Constitution. Hoover amassed significant power by collecting files containing large amounts of compromising and potentially embarrassing information on many powerful people, especially politicians. According to Laurence Silberman, appointed Deputy Attorney General in early 1974, FBI Director Clarence M. Kelley thought such files either did not exist or had been destroyed. After The Washington Post broke a story in January 1975, Kelley searched and found them in his outer office. The House Judiciary Committee then demanded that Silberman testify about them.
  • 1953
    A federal investigation that followed convinced President Dwight D. Eisenhower to sign an Executive Order on April 29, 1953, that barred homosexuals from obtaining jobs at the federal level.
    More Details Hide Details In his 2004 study of the event, historian David K. Johnson attacked the speculations about Hoover's homosexuality as relying on "the kind of tactics Hoover and the security program he oversaw perfected—guilt by association, rumor, and unverified gossip." He views Rosenstiel as a liar who was paid for her story, whose "description of Hoover in drag engaging in sex with young blond boys in leather while desecrating the Bible is clearly a homophobic fantasy." He believes only those who have forgotten the virulence of the decades-long campaign against homosexuals in government can believe reports that Hoover appeared in compromising situations. Some people associated with Hoover have supported the rumors about his homosexual tendencies. Actress and singer Ethel Merman, who was a friend of Hoover's since 1938, said in a 1978 interview, "Some of my best friends are homosexual. Everybody knew about J. Edgar Hoover, but he was the best chief the FBI ever had." According to Anthony Summers, Hoover often frequented New York City's Stork Club. Luisa Stuart, a model who was 18 or 19 at the time, told Summers that she had seen Hoover holding hands with Tolson as they all rode in a limo uptown to the Cotton Club in 1936.
  • 1950
    In 1950, at the outbreak of the Korean War, Hoover submitted to President Truman a plan to suspend the writ of habeas corpus and detain 12,000 Americans suspected of disloyalty.
    More Details Hide Details Truman did not act on the plan.
  • 1946
    In 1946, Attorney General Tom C. Clark authorized Hoover to compile a list of potentially disloyal Americans who might be detained during a wartime national emergency.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1941
    During this time period President Roosevelt, out of concern over Nazi agents in the United States, gave "qualified permission" to wiretap persons "suspected... of subversive activities". He went on to add, in 1941, that the United States Attorney General had to be informed of its use in each case.
    More Details Hide Details The Attorney General Robert H. Jackson left it to Hoover to decide how and when to use wiretaps, as he found the "whole business" distasteful. Jackson's successor at the post of Attorney General, Francis Biddle, did turn down Hoover's requests on occasion. The FBI participated in the Venona Project, a pre–World War II joint project with the British to eavesdrop on Soviet spies in the UK and the United States. They did not initially realize that espionage was being committed, but Soviet multiple use of one-time pad ciphers, which are normally unbreakable, created redundancies. This let some intercepts be decoded, which established the espionage. Hoover kept the intercepts—America's greatest counterintelligence secret—in a locked safe in his office, choosing not to inform President Truman, Attorney General J. Howard McGrath, or two Secretaries of State—Dean Acheson and General George Marshall—while they held office. He informed the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) of the Venona Project in 1952.
  • 1939
    In 1939, the FBI became pre-eminent in the field of domestic intelligence, thanks in large part to changes made by Hoover, such as expanding and combining fingerprint files in the Identification Division, to compile the largest collection of fingerprints to date, and Hoover's help to expand the FBI's recruitment and create the FBI Laboratory, a division established in 1932 to examine and analyze evidence found by the FBI.
    More Details Hide Details Hoover was concerned about what he claimed was subversion, and under his leadership, the FBI investigated tens of thousands of suspected subversives and radicals. According to critics, Hoover tended to exaggerate the dangers of these alleged subversives and many times overstepped his bounds in his pursuit of eliminating that perceived threat. William G. Hundley, a Justice Department prosecutor, said Hoover may have inadvertently kept alive the concern over communist infiltration into the government because Hoover's "informants were nearly the only ones that paid the party dues." The FBI investigated rings of German saboteurs and spies starting in the late 1930s, and had primary responsibility for counterespionage. The first arrests of German agents were made in 1938 and continued throughout World War II. In the Quirin affair, during World War II, German U-boats set two small groups of Nazi agents ashore in Florida and Long Island to cause acts of sabotage within the country. The two teams were apprehended after one of the men contacted the FBI and told them everything. He was also charged and convicted. During the war and for many years afterward, the FBI maintained a fictionalized version of the story in which it had preempted and caught the saboteurs solely by its own investigations and had even infiltrated the German government. This story was useful during the war to discourage the Germans by making the FBI seem more invincible than it really was and perhaps afterward to similarly mislead the Soviets; but it also served Hoover in his efforts to maintain a superhero-style image for the FBI in American minds.
  • 1934
    In late July 1934, Special Agent Melvin Purvis, the Director of Operations in the Chicago office, received a tip on Dillinger's whereabouts that paid off when Dillinger was located, ambushed, and killed by Bureau agents outside the Biograph Theater.
    More Details Hide Details In the same period, there were numerous Mafia shootings as a result of Prohibition, while Hoover continued to deny the very existence of organized crime. Gangster Frank Costello helped encourage this view by feeding Hoover tips on sure winners through their mutual friend, gossip columnist Walter Winchell. (Hoover had a reputation as "an inveterate horseplayer" known to send Special Agents to place $100 bets for him.) Hoover said the Bureau had "much more important functions" than arresting bookmakers and gamblers. Hoover was credited with several highly publicized captures or shootings of outlaws and bank robbers, even though he was not present at the events. These included those of Machine Gun Kelly in 1933, of Dillinger in 1934, and of Alvin Karpis in 1936, which led to the Bureau's powers being broadened. In 1935, the Bureau was renamed the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
  • 1924
    On May 10, 1924, President Calvin Coolidge appointed Hoover as the sixth Director of the Bureau of Investigation, partly in response to allegations that the prior director, William J. Burns, was involved in the Teapot Dome scandal.
    More Details Hide Details When Hoover took over the Bureau of Investigation, it had approximately 650 employees, including 441 Special Agents. Hoover was sometimes unpredictable in his leadership. He frequently fired Bureau agents, singling out those he thought "looked stupid like truck drivers," or whom he considered "pinheads." He also relocated agents who had displeased him to career-ending assignments and locations; Melvin Purvis was a prime example. Purvis was one of the most effective agents in capturing and breaking up 1930s gangs, and it is alleged that Hoover maneuvered him out of the Bureau because Hoover was jealous of the substantial public recognition Purvis received. Hoover often hailed local law-enforcement officers around the country, and built up a national network of supporters and admirers in the process. One whom he often commended for particular effectiveness was the conservative sheriff of Caddo Parish, Louisiana, J. Howell Flournoy.
  • 1921
    In 1921, Hoover rose in the Bureau of Investigation to deputy head and, in 1924, the Attorney General made him the acting director.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1919
    In August 1919, Hoover became head of the Bureau of Investigation's new General Intelligence Division—also known as the Radical Division because its goal was to monitor and disrupt the work of domestic radicals.
    More Details Hide Details America's First Red Scare was beginning, and one of Hoover's first assignments was to carry out the Palmer Raids. Hoover and his chosen assistant, George Ruch, monitored a variety of U.S. radicals with the intent to punish, arrest, or deport those whose politics they decided were dangerous. Targets during this period included Marcus Garvey; Rose Pastor Stokes and Cyril Briggs; Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman; and future Supreme Court justice Felix Frankfurter, who, Hoover maintained, was "the most dangerous man in the United States".
  • 1917
    He received additional authority from the 1917 Espionage Act.
    More Details Hide Details Out of a list of 1,400 suspicious Germans living in the U.S., the Bureau arrested 98 and designated 1,172 as arrestable.
  • 1916
    He obtained a Bachelor of Laws from The George Washington University Law School in 1916, where he was a member of the Alpha Nu Chapter of the Kappa Alpha Order, and an LL.M., a Master of Laws degree, in 1917 from the same university.
    More Details Hide Details While a law student, Hoover became interested in the career of Anthony Comstock, the New York City United States Postal Inspector, who waged prolonged campaigns against fraud, vice, pornography, and birth control. Hoover lived in Washington, D.C. for his entire life. Hoover was 18 years old when he accepted his first job, an entry-level position as messenger in the orders department, at the Library of Congress. The library was a half mile from his house. The experience shaped both Hoover and the creation of the FBI profiles; as Hoover noted in a 1951 letter, "This job … trained me in the value of collating material. It gave me an excellent foundation for my work in the FBI where it has been necessary to collate information and evidence." Immediately after getting his LL.M. degree, Hoover was hired by the Justice Department to work in the War Emergency Division. He soon became the head of the Division's Alien Enemy Bureau, authorized by President Wilson at the beginning of World War I to arrest and jail disloyal foreigners without trial.
  • 1895
    Hoover did not have a birth certificate filed upon his birth, although it was required in 1895 Washington.
    More Details Hide Details Two of his siblings had certificates, but Hoover's was not filed until 1938, when he was 43. Hoover grew up near the Eastern Market, in Washington's Capitol Hill neighborhood, and attended Central High School, where he sang in the school choir, participated in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps program, and competed on the debate team, where he argued against women getting the right to vote and against the abolition of the death penalty. The school newspaper applauded his "cool, relentless logic". Hoover was a stutterer as a boy, which he overcame by teaching himself to talk fast—a style that he carried through his adult career. He eventually spoke with such ferocious speed that stenographers had a hard time following him.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)