Jack Murphy
Jack Murphy
(John) Jack Murphy (1920 – 11 July 1984) was an Irish politician and the first unemployed person ever elected to a national legislature. He was elected to Dáil Éireann as an independent Teachta Dála (TD) at the 1957 general election for the Dublin South–Central constituency. Murphy was a former member of the Irish Republican Army who had been interned in the 1940s. At the time of his election, he was an unemployed carpenter.
Biography
Jack Murphy's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Jack Murphy
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Jack Murphy
News
News abour Jack Murphy from around the web
TinCaps need to bounce back - Fort Wayne Journal Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
Jack Murphy followed with an RBI single to center field. Despite the loss, Fort Wayne (35-27, 65-66 overall) remains two games ahead of West Michigan for the Eastern Division's final playoff spot. The Whitecaps (33-29) lost at Dayton 6-0
Article Link:
Google News article
Lawmakers attend meeting about water - Forsyth County News Online
Google News - over 5 years
Jack Murphy, both Republicans from Cumming, attended the session, which focused on the tri-state water wars and on Gov.Nathan Deal's Water Task Force. The 11th US Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled that water supply for metro Atlanta is an
Article Link:
Google News article
Veteran quarterback, eager rookie a nice formula - Minneapolis Star Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
The site will be Qualcomm Stadium, a place that was around so long ago as a football/baseball facility that it formerly was named in honor of a sportswriter (Jack Murphy) rather than a corporation. The first half-century of full-fledged competition
Article Link:
Google News article
Shipston take spoils against Bretforton - Evesham Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Julian Morris and Jack Murphy survived a difficult 14 overs, reaching 42 before Morris was dismissed by Dell in similar style. A rare failure by Paul Cross (7) saw the visitors reduced to 57-3 from 19 overs. Murphy had added 37 with Sam Hince (7) and
Article Link:
Google News article
Ammanford fall short on final journey - South Wales Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Batting first, Llandudno were soon in trouble as Jack Murphy and Tom Maynard took a couple of early wickets. A third wicket stand of 60 between Duncan Widgeley (72) and Jordan Kane (29) provided the bulk of LlandudnoÕs total, but with KaneÕs departure,
Article Link:
Google News article
Proposed state maps signal changes afoot - Forsyth County News Online
Google News - over 5 years
Jack Murphy, would include only Forsyth County. The state House and Senate will meet this week to discuss the maps. Once the legislature has approved the final versions, the maps must still pass through Congress and the US Department of Justice
Article Link:
Google News article
Coming Sunday in MoneyWise - Charlotte Observer
Google News - over 5 years
Talk from the Top: Earth Fare CEO Jack Murphy talks with the Observer about how his Asheville-based grocery chain has managed to expand in a down economy, and how it competes with chains that emphasize low prices. What's ahead for economy?
Article Link:
Google News article
Earth Fare brings its 'food philosophy' to Huntersville - CorneliusNews.net
Google News - over 5 years
CEO Jack Murphy has a high opinion of Earth Fare's produce. (David Boraks/CorneliusNews.net) By DAVID BORAKS HUNTERSVILLE – Asheville-based grocery chain Earth Fare calls itself “the healthy supermarket,” and as it opened its newest store in
Article Link:
Google News article
Memphis Tiger staff watching trio of up-and-comers - Memphis Commercial Appeal
Google News - over 5 years
Tennessee and UMass. "Coach Pastner has been to like every (Georgia Stars) game (this week), so that shows a lot to me," Hunt said. "Coach Pastner and (Memphis assistant) coach (Jack) Murphy have showed a lot of interest in me. They're in the mix."
Article Link:
Google News article
Close games all round for St Joseph's - Drogheda Independent
Google News - over 5 years
Jack Murphy challenged the ball really well, made great passes and took point opportunities, while Lily Maye made some great kickouts from goal. Westernswere very impressive in their organising of the blitz, which was played on a beautiful sunny
Article Link:
Google News article
Rain stops good day for Wade - Rockdale Citizen
Google News - over 5 years
No makeup dates had been announced at press time, though Rockdale coach Jack Murphy said the only two dates available for either team would be July 18 or 19. “It's one of those things, it's July,” Murphy said. “I really needed to play these two today
Article Link:
Google News article
Senator's property not foreclosed on - Forsyth County News Online
Google News - over 5 years
Jack Murphy said he was never worried about losing a 1-acre property in downtown Cumming to foreclosure. The District 27 Republican state senator from Cumming, who also serves as Senate Banking
Article Link:
Google News article
Penny Murphy, who founded Urban Wildlife Rescue, dies at 62 - Denver Post
Google News - over 5 years
"Penny had an uncanny knack for looking at an animal and diagnosing the illness or injury," said her husband, Jack Murphy. Diagnoses aren't as easy with patients that can't say, "My stomach hurts," Murphy said. Penny had the idea for opening Urban
Article Link:
Google News article
Fireworks Safety, Jack Murphy Wins Award, Congratulate your grad on Patch ... - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Jack Murphy to be Honored with Chester A. Smith Award The Field Library announced yesterday that Jack Murphy will be honored with the 2011 Chester A. Smith Award on Oct. 15, 2011 at an evening ceremony. Congratulations to Jack on his award!
Article Link:
Google News article
Long private, Staten Island's Jack Murphy returns briefly to the limelight - SILive.com
Google News - over 5 years
/Bill LyonsFormer Staten Island congressman John (Jack) Murphy, center, who shunned the limelight for years, is once again the center of attention as he chats with Mark Murphy, left, of West Brighton and Mendy
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jack Murphy
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1984
    Age 64
    He died on 11 July 1984.
    More Details Hide Details
    He died on 11 July 1984, aged 64 years.
    More Details Hide Details In the wake of his resignation and emigration to Canada, Murphy became a convenient scape-goat and was pilloried by established politicians, rivals and even certain former supporters. Indeed for the remainder of his life he endured an unrelentingly hostile and negative campaign from many quarters which attempted to put an unfavourable "spin" on both his intentions and his actions as a TD. He later responded to several of the chief accusations laid against him in the article "Why I left Ireland" as told to Jim Flanagan which was published in The Sunday Review on 29 March 1959. One accusation is he used his influence as a TD to cheat the system and assist supporters. However Murphy himself stated emphatically to Jim Flanagan in this article how he was careful to avoid abusing his influence as a TD. For example, he refused to get jobs for people, as other TDs both before and after him did as a matter of course, rather electing to help people via existing support structures: "I did what I could, for they were all my friends... but there was far too much place hunting, however as far as I could I helped those who were in trouble, mainly through the labour exchange."
  • 1982
    Age 62
    He worked there until 1982 when he took ill.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1964
    Age 44
    Murphy returned to Ireland with his family in 1964.
    More Details Hide Details He lived for a short spell in Dublin's York Street before moving out to the suburbs of Coolock, on the north side of Dublin City. He continued working as a carpenter on various building sites around Dublin. His last place of employment was at Cadburys in Coolock.
    After his resignation he subsequently emigrated with his family to Canada but returned to Ireland in 1964.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1959
    Age 39
    After a number of years, due to homesickness, Murphy returned with his family to Ireland as the economic situation in his native country had improved and there was more opportunities for work than existed in 1959 when emigration was at its peak.
    More Details Hide Details
    Faced with this situation he reluctantly made the decision to emigrate to Canada in 1959.
    More Details Hide Details He stated "Since Christmas I have been unable to get any work, apart from a couple of weeks. The building trade is finished. But there is plenty of work if only the Government would put up the money for it instead of putting millions into the purchase of jet planes. Irish tradesmen have emigrated in thousands. And they will continue to go. There is no hope for them here. Many people will say that I am quitting, pulling out in failure. But mostly they will be people with good, solid jobs. IF I SAW THE SLIGHTEST HOPE, I WOULD STAY. I REPEAT THAT. But it broke my heart to see my wife trying to get along on a few shillings a week." Following his resignation, Murphy emigrated to Saskatchewan, Canada, where his sister Molly and her husband Micheal Durnin lived. Once he arrived he set about seeking employment but carpentry work in Saskatchewan at that time was hard to get. In January 1960 he was visited by another Dublin man from Francis St named Joe Johnston who at the time was in the Canadian Armed Forces, Signal Corps. Johnston had just been posted to Regina after a large winter army exercise near Alberta, he heard about an Irish family who were living in Regina and tracked them down. He says "The first time I met Jack, I was shocked to find him and his family living in a small 1 bedroom shack without heating buried under huge snow drifts.
  • 1958
    Age 38
    Ultimately, less than a year later, on Saturday 13 May 1958 he yielded to the mounting pressure and resigned his seat in protest at the indifference of the main political parties to the plight of the unemployed.
    More Details Hide Details The subsequent by-election was won by Patrick Cummins of Fianna Fáil. Of his resignation Murphy later stated: "I was fed up with the callous indifference of the big parties to the situation of the workers. I resigned as a protest against appalling indifference of those parties to the unemployed... When Mr de Valera was nominated for Taoiseach, I opposed him because he had broken his promise on unemployment and emigration. I told the house that my presence there was a symbol of broken promises. I said that I would support any scheme to put an end to mass unemployment and emigration. But in my 15 months in the Dáil, no-one put forward such a scheme." Immediately following his resignation as a TD, Murphy, now once again unemployed, discovered to his dismay that as a result of his cards not being stamped during his time in office he was no longer eligible for full assistance and was reduced to living on the meagre sum of £2 1 shilling per week for his entire family.
    He resigned his seat on 13 May 1958 in protest at the indifference of the main political parties to the plight of the unemployed.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1957
    Age 37
    Under severe strain and personal attack from all sides Murphy thus began to disassociate himself from UPC activities. In August 1957 he formally broke with the committee.
    More Details Hide Details
    Murphy tried first to oppose the impending budget within the Dáil. In his statement of 15 May 1957 he contrasted the budget sharply with the unfilled pre-election promises of Fianna Fáil: "On behalf of my unemployed colleagues, I want to make it quite clear that we are opposed completely to this Budget, firstly, because it does nothing to relieve unemployment and there is no indication of any plans by the Government to bring about increased employment.
    More Details Hide Details In fact, this Budget will worsen the unemployment position by reducing the purchasing power of the people. Secondly, we are opposed to it because it inflicts a greater hardship on the suffering unemployed, old age pensioners, widows and the lower income groups. The demands of the unemployed are quite simple and realistic: that the Government should immediately take what measures it intends taking to alleviate unemployment. We do not want merely words and paper proposals; we want action based on concrete proposals." However given the majority that Fianna Fáil enjoyed within the government, Murphy realised that even if he could force a vote on the budget he would inevitably lose and so further debate on the issue would serve little purpose but to waste time. He next tried to put pressure on the government to scale back the proposed cuts via "people power", stating "the unemployed are a force to be reckoned with. Flesh and blood, not just something the statistician jumbles around with.", he began mobilising supporters to stage a series of high profile street demonstrations. To escalate things further, along with two other members of the UPC (Tommy Kavanagh and Jimmy Byrne) Murphy began a hunger strike in opposition to the budget. Each evening they addressed thousands of supporters who assembled at protest meetings in Dublin at the corner of Abbey Street and O'Connell Street.
    When he not being strategically ignored within the Dáil he was under attack from the members of the house, as demonstrated by Fine Gael's Stephen Barrett, who on 12 June 1957 declared the UPC (and therefore Murphy himself) part of "a new communist assault" on Ireland.
    More Details Hide Details As a result, Murphy made little headway in the political process within the Dáil. In the end he admitted in despair that "I found that Leinster House was more a centre of political activity and useless talk than a place where plans could be made to ease the lot of the unfortunate". Murphy's troubles were greatly multiplied once the new Fianna Fáil government's budget was revealed to be a particularly severe one, and including planning for the ending of food subsidies which was going to hit his support base of the unemployed and low paid workers particularly hard. Murphy later said: "In my time in the Dáil and even before that, I was in many of their unemployed homes. I saw hunger and misery, ill-nourished children and despairing parents. That is still continuing. I knew when the 'famine budget' of 1957 was brought in that their position would be worsened."
    Despite this, over his term, Murphy stubbornly persisted and used every opportunityto ignite serious consideration within the Dáil on questions surrounding poverty, emigration and unemployment assistance. He also used his vote in protest to remind the established parties of their pre-election promises; as exemplified by his statement on 20 March 1957 in opposition to the election of the Fianna Fáil leader Éamon de Valera as Taoiseach: I do not propose to support the nomination of Deputy de Valera as Taoiseach, despite the fact that Deputy de Valera has publicly stated that his first task will be to solve unemployment.
    More Details Hide Details I have heard these promises before and my presence here is a symbol of broken promises and should be taken as a warning that emigration and unemployment will no longer be suffered in silence. This election proves that the people have given Fianna Fáil the task of solving unemployment. I realise that that problem will not be solved in a few weeks and that any Government should be given an opportunity of putting its programme into effect. I will support fully any scheme which will reduce unemployment and emigration. I hope my simple statement will be met with understanding, both inside and outside the House. Murphy did not limit his role to criticism. He also made suggestions for new projects which could create jobs "In view of the fact that there is still widespread unemployment in the building industry, would the Taoiseach consider taking more drastic measures to bring about a revival of house building? In Dublin City, we have no concert hall, no proper Houses of Parliament and we need more modern municipal buildings. The country needs these things very badly and they would give much-needed employment to building workers. I speak, Sir, with a sense of urgency which springs from looking at unfortunate men trying to survive in present conditions."
    Murphy was considered an independent as he was not affiliated to any of the established political parties like Fianna Fáil, which won the majority of seats at the 1957 general election.
    More Details Hide Details While many of his unemployed supporters considered the fact that Murphy had been elected as victory in itself, neither they nor Murphy had anticipated the task he faced inside the Dáil. His maiden speech was greeted by sneers and sniggers from the professional politicians in the Dáil and set the scene for what was to follow. The suspicion and disdain with which Murphy was regarded with by established parliamentary members meant that initially he could not get answers to even to the most basic of his queries – such as how much unemployment relief money was to be spent in Dublin. In contrast, the same politicians had no problem in addressing trivial concerns like those raised by Fine Gael's Jack Belton when he asked about the "hardship imposed on cricket clubs because of the cost of cricket balls".
    He was elected to Dáil Éireann as an independent Teachta Dála (TD) at the 1957 general election for the Dublin South-Central constituency.
    More Details Hide Details Murphy was a former member of the Irish Republican Army who had been interned in the 1940s. At the time of his election, he was an unemployed carpenter. He was the candidate of the Unemployed Protest Committee (UPC), which had been formed on 12 January 1957.
  • 1956
    Age 36
    Nolan himself pointed out that his Communist credentials would have a negative impact as anti-communist hysteria was rife following the Soviet invasion of Hungary of 1956.
    More Details Hide Details It was decided that Murphy, with his republican background, would run in the Dublin South-Central constituency, firstly because this inner city constituency had a high population density which would be more convenient to canvass compared than a large sprawling area, and secondly it housed the largest Labour Exchange in Dublin City, Werburgh Street. This location offered a platform for the UPC to get their message across. They distributed leaflets outside Werburgh Street while across the River Liffey on Dublin's North side, they broadcast election messages from a UPC office at the Dublin Trades' Union Council in Gardiner Street, with hired and borrowed loadspeakers, to men signing on at the nearby Gardiner Street Labour Exchange. The task of raising the £100 deposit necessary to stand as a candidate was taken on by Peader O'Donnell. He received £25 each from four friends including Fr. Counihane, a Jesuit priest who sympathised with the cause of Labour;, Digby, the owner of Pye Radio; a Fianna Fáil politician called Murry; and Toddy O'Sullivan, manager of the Gresham Hotel. It has been said of Dublin City that "a good cause will always find support in an unexpected way"; the campaign was run on a shoestring budget. Murphy said of their financial situation, "We had no funds. With bobs and pennies sacrificed from doles and unemployment money we fought on".
    However, in 1956, during which record unemployed figures were reached in Ireland, he found himself one of the many thousands out of work.
    More Details Hide Details He emigrated to England, but returned after four months as he missed his family. He later said: "I am against emigration for many reasons, one is that it wrecks family life. When I worked in England I nearly broke my heart thinking of my wife and youngsters all the time I was there. Here in Ireland the clergy and politicians are always preaching about the sanctity of the Christian family, but they do nothing about the unemployment and emigration that is breaking up thousands of families." Murphy came to the conclusion that the only way to fight unemployment was to do it in Ireland with an organised movement. As he saw it, with national emigration running at 40–50,000 per year, "Irish capital is being exported abroad and the Irish working class are being exported with it." On 12 January 1957 with 11 other Dublin men they formed the Unemployed Protest Committee (UPC) for the purpose of protesting against the unemployment situation, and Murphy was named as secretary. While some articles and papers written after the event later imply that the UPC had been a political organisation, Murphy himself never intended the UPC to be either a political organisation or political party. He explained: "The UPC was not a political organisation as such. It was intended to spotlight the problem of unemployment and emigration. That was my intention when I went to the Dáil".
  • 1953
    Age 33
    He returned to his trade of carpentry where he was quickly re-elected shop steward after he took a leading part in several actions and strikes for better conditions, most notably the strike to end the campaign of sackings by employers which took place in 1953.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1950
    Age 30
    In the Mansion House Exhibition of 1950 he won an arts and crafts certificate for his leather and craftwork.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1941
    Age 21
    Arrested in 1941 by the Fianna Fáil government, he was interned with a number of other republicans in the Curragh until the end of the The Emergency in 1945.
    More Details Hide Details These four years afforded him time to study, broadening his interest and outlook. A fluent Irish speaker, he was interviewed in Irish for his entry into the National College of Art and Design after his release from the Curragh.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1920
    Age 0
    Murphy was born in 1920 at the back of Synge Street, Dublin.
    More Details Hide Details He was the second youngest son of a carpenter and had five brothers and five sisters. His father, a well-known athlete who won the all-Ireland walking championship in 1903, was active in the republican movement and was a founder-member of the National Union of Woodworkers. Murphy joined Fianna Éireann at the age of 10. Up to the age of 14 he attended St Mary's National School, Rathmines, and then started work as an apprentice carpenter, while attending Bolton Street Technical College, now Dublin Institute of Technology in the evenings. He became a member of the Irish Republican Army at 16. He was also an active trade union member from an early age as demonstrated when, as a carpenters apprentice, he became one of the leaders of a strike on the River Liffey Reservoir Scheme (popularly known as the Poulaphouca Scheme). The strike lasted several months until only three of the original committee remained, with Murphy being one of them.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)