Jacqueline Susann
Novelist, actress
Jacqueline Susann
Jacqueline Susann was an American novelist. Her most famous work is Valley of the Dolls.
Biography
Jacqueline Susann's personal information overview.
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News
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David Slavitt Joins the 100 Club at 76 - Publishers Weekly
Google News - over 5 years
After reading one of his reviews, Jacqueline Susann publisher Bernard Geis bought him an expensive lunch and offered him an advance. Geis's advice, write fictionalized nonfiction by standing in front of a newsrack, led to Slavitt's roman à clef written
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Browsing the Arts for Aug. 26-Sept. 1, 2011 - Plain Dealer (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Theatre a Go-Go adaptation of Jacqueline Susann's "The Valley of the Dolls." 8 pm Monday. $21. Convergence-Continuum. The Liminis. 2438 Scranton Road, Cleveland. 216-687-0074 or convergence-continuum.org. Adam Block's "Five Flights
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The almanac - UPI.com
Google News - over 5 years
They include Benjamin Harrison, 23rd president of the United States, in 1833; poet Edgar Guest in 1881; horror writer HP Lovecraft in 1890; baseball Hall of Fame member Al Lopez in 1908; architect Eero Saarinen in 1910; author Jacqueline Susann in 1918
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Rouco Varela, José Tomás, Demi Lovato y algunos matrimonios acaban bien - Hechos de Hoy
Google News - over 5 years
... la novelista estadounidense Jacqueline Susann (1918-1974), las artistas gemelas hermanas Kessler (1936), el actor español Francisco Valladares (1935), el Premio Nobel de Literatura italiano Salvatore Quasimodo (1901-1968) y la actriz y cantante
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Friday Magazine arts calendar for Aug. 19-25 - Plain Dealer (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Theatre a Go-Go adaptation of Jacqueline Susann's "The Valley of the Dolls." 8 pm Monday. Repeats 8 pm Monday, Aug. 29, at Weathervane Playhouse, 1301 Weathervane Lane, Akron. Call 330-836-2626. $25. Convergence-Continuum. The Liminis
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'Valley of the Dolls' stage adaptation to benefit AIDS Taskforce of Greater ... - Plain Dealer
Google News - over 5 years
Back row from left: PJ Toomey, Tricia Bestic, Ian Atwood, Brian Bowers, Gregory Violand and Jonathan Kronenberger What: An adaptation by Theatre a Go-Go from a screenplay by Helen Deutsch and Dorothy Kingsley, based on the novel by Jacqueline Susann
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Weekend Tech Blog: Loving ebooks (one man's shocking confession) - Crosscut (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The picture accompanying this blog is of me at 22 accompanying the late Jacqueline Susann at a book signing in Hollywood for “Every Night, Josephine,” her first book, about that French poodle sitting nonchalantly in my lap. Jackie did the real work;
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The Unexpected Icon: Valley Of The Dolls - StyleList
Google News - over 5 years
The film, based on the book by Jacqueline Susann, which was published in 1966, follows three women as they try to make their way on Broadway, and eventually Hollywood. This movie has everything: big hair, heavily-lined cat-eyes, lots of light pink
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Lauren Conrad: Interview with raannt - StyleBistro
Google News - over 5 years
Also, Jacqueline Susann's Valley of the Dolls was great—loved it! And any of Chelsea Handlers book. I am obsessed with all of them! 18. What are five things we could find in your purse at any time?? Lip balm, my Blackberry, red lipstick,
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So bad they're good - Irish Times
Google News - over 5 years
It was filled with blockbusters by Jacqueline Susann, Jackie Collins and Jilly Cooper, as well as lots of teen novels. But despite its name, getting into the Cupboard of Shame was really an honour. We liked trashy books, but we were selective
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Exhibits & openings this week - Connect Savannah.com
Google News - over 5 years
Reception: June 17, 7-9pm Starland Cafe, 11 E. 41st St. , Jacqueline Susann and the Style of the '60s - Pieces from Susann's personal archives, period garments and current fashions and designs inspired by the author, the book and the movie ("Valley of
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Portnoy's Revenge - TPMCafé
Google News - over 5 years
Not long after Philip Roth published Portnoy's Complaint, Jacqueline Susann went on the Johnny Carson show. Susann, we remember, had become famous for her pulp novel Valley of the Dolls, which triangulated,
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VIDEO: FilmOut San Diego to screen “Valley Of The Dolls” on June 15 - San Diego Gay & Lesbian News
Google News - over 5 years
“Valley Of The Dolls” (1967) was directed by Mark Robson and based on the trashy best-seller by Jacqueline Susann that blew the lid off the deep, dark secrets of show biz and the abuse of “dolls,” slang for downers and barbiturates and methadone
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Kaboom talks about teenage sex - Evening Standard
Google News - over 5 years
Jacqueline Susann, the author of Valley of the Dolls, once said that 40 was unthinkable, "40 is Hiroshima" (she was well past that marker at the time). Araki evidently feels the same way about even approaching the end of teenage glory
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Book Fatigue (a love letter to the Hare with Amber Eyes) - Crikey (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Thus were the categories of Adult and Pulp satisfactorily fused forever — epitomised for me by Jacqueline Susann's trash epic Valley of the Dolls. One critic said Susann “typed on a cash register,” she was that readable. (And how did I forget?
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Deep Inside Hollywood for June 6, 2011 - SouthFloridaGayNews.com
Google News - over 5 years
Once Is Not Enough is more than just the name of a best-selling Jacqueline Susann novel, it's how Hollywood does business all the time, cranking out remake after remake as fast as they can. The latest: another version of Carrie
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Girls, pick your bedtime reading with care - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Armed with Scarlett O'Hara's ruthlessness and the conviction, gleaned from Jacqueline Susann's Valley of the Dolls, that leaving home was the first step to liberation, I convinced my parents to let me go away to university. It had to be Cambridge,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jacqueline Susann
    FIFTIES
  • 1974
    Age 55
    Died on September 21, 1974.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1973
    Age 54
    Like her other books, it was a success, in this case being the second best-selling novel of 1973 in the United States.
    More Details Hide Details When she was admitted to the hospital for the last time, she remained in a coma for seven weeks before dying at the age of 56. Her last words to her husband Mansfield were, "Hiya, doll. Let's get the hell outta here." In the late 1970s, Susann's romance/science fiction novel Yargo was published. Written in the late 1950s, the novel is a radical and somewhat bizarre departure from her later works. It is likely that it was only published due to the continuing interest in Susann's writings. Those who knew Susann noticed a strong physical resemblance between Yargo and the actor Yul Brynner, with whom Susann had been infatuated during her youth. Susann's last novel, Dolores, is a thinly-veiled presentation on the life of Jacqueline Kennedy. It was published in 1976. A condensed version of the novel was published in the Ladies' Home Journal, under the title "Jackie by Jackie." When her severe illness prevented Susann from completing Dolores, her close friend and fellow writer Rex Reed anonymously took over.
    After suffering from a persistent cough and breathing problems, Susann checked into Doctors Hospital on January 11, 1973, hoping to stop coughing before her upcoming book tour, which was to begin in March.
    More Details Hide Details Susann remained there five days while undergoing tests. X-rays revealed a nodular lesion in the right lung area. She was transferred to Mount Sinai, a larger hospital with more extensive facilities, for a bronchoscopy and biopsy. On January 18, Susann was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, though there was evidently some debate among the doctors about whether it was an original and separate lung cancer, requiring perhaps more surgery but fewer chemicals. Susann was given only months to live yet persisted to go on a book tour for Once Is Not Enough.
  • 1969
    Age 50
    However, not everyone was a fan. On July 24, 1969, author Truman Capote, himself a talk-show regular and a controversial figure, created a media storm when he appeared on The Tonight Show.
    More Details Hide Details Capote stated that Susann looked like "a truck driver in drag." Susann threatened to sue Capote and NBC-TV over that and other comments. In turn, Capote apologized "to truck drivers everywhere." Johnny Carson gave Susann the chance to fire back at Capote, and Carson asked her on the air, "What do you think of Truman?" Susann quipped, "Truman... Truman. I think history will prove he's one of the best presidents we've had."
  • FORTIES
  • 1967
    Age 48
    However, already irked by Judy Garland being fired from the movie, Susann herself hated the film and, after its November 1967 premiere aboard the passenger liner, Princess Italia, she confronted the film's director, Mark Robson, and stated, "This picture is a piece of shit."
    More Details Hide Details Susann and Mansfield enjoyed the fame that her books garnered. Susann went on to publish several more novels, all in a similar vein to Valley of the Dolls. She also made frequent appearances on television, particularly as a guest on talk shows. Her pointed repartee added spice to the programs on which she was featured.
  • 1966
    Age 47
    Valley of the Dolls was initially rejected by some publishers. However, Susann persisted, and when the novel was published on February 10, 1966, it was an immediate hit.
    More Details Hide Details The subject matter was considered inappropriate by many people in the general public at that time, and it was a mixture of soap-opera style story-telling with bold, non-traditional characters. The story was a roman à clef of sorts, with characters in the novel reportedly based on real-life celebrities such as Judy Garland and Ethel Merman. Valley of the Dolls broke sales records with more than 30 million copies sold. As popular as Valley of the Dolls was, many contemporary authors dismissed Susann's writing talents. The novelist Gore Vidal said, "She doesn't write, she types!" Critics attacked her by saying Susann "typed on a cash register." Susann responded to literary critics by saying, "As a writer, no one's gonna tell me how to write. I'm gonna write the way I wanna write!" Part of this novel's success stemmed from Susann's and Mansfield's tireless efforts to promote it. The couple traveled worldwide (especially where English was the predominant language) promoting the novel and her following novels on talk shows and in hundreds of bookstores. Wherever Susann went on her cross-country tours, she signed each copy of her book that was available. She wrote down the name and address of every person she met and reportedly later on sent thank-you cards to everyone.
  • 1962
    Age 43
    Around that time, Susann developed breast cancer. She had a mastectomy on December 27, 1962, but kept her cancer a secret.
    More Details Hide Details Susann, determined to become a bestselling author, began writing her first novel, Valley of the Dolls. Valley of the Dolls became the best-selling novel in the United States. Valley was followed by two best-selling novels, The Love Machine, published in 1969, and Once Is Not Enough, published in 1973, the year before her death.
  • 1961
    Age 42
    She continued to be the "Schiffli Girl" until 1961.
    More Details Hide Details In the early 1960s, Susann tried writing an exposé on show business and illegal drugs that she intended to call The Pink Dolls. However, she changed her mind and wrote her first successful book, Every Night, Josephine! which was based on her life with her poodle. She sometimes dressed her dog Josephine in outfits to match her own. Although this book was widely viewed as a novelty, it sold well enough for her to write and publish her second book, the novel Valley of the Dolls (1966). Michael Korda in his memoir, Another Life described how Susann invented her own kind of genre describing it as "shopgirl romance, brought up to date with lots of dirty talk, the suggestion of rough sex, and an unsentimental view of men." Korda also says that Susann, her husband Irving Mansfield and her original publisher Bernard Geis invented a new way of selling a novel—a "shameless blend of column plants, celebrity appearances, and Hollywood gossip that was new to book publishing but old hat for the theater and movies.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1955
    Age 36
    In 1955, Susann acquired her poodle Josephine and a contract to be the fashion commentator for "Schiffli Lace" on the Night Time, New York program.
    More Details Hide Details Susann wrote, starred in, and produced two live commercials every night.
  • 1951
    Age 32
    In May and June 1951, Susann hosted Jacqueline Susann's Open Door on the DuMont Television Network.
    More Details Hide Details The show only lasted for a few episodes. In 1956, Susann became a panelist on an NBC summer series, This Is Show Business (formerly a regular program on CBS). The later episodes were produced by her husband Irving Mansfield.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1939
    Age 20
    Although not sexually attracted to him, she married him on April 2, 1939 at Har Zion Temple in Philadelphia.
    More Details Hide Details Mansfield went on to manage Susann's career. Soon, she was a regular on The Morey Amsterdam Show, playing Lola the Cigarette Girl. Susann then got a spot in the Broadway show A Lady Says Yes, starring Carole Landis and Jack Albertson. The following year, Susann wrote her first play, Lovely Me, for production on Broadway. It closed after 37 performances. Susann and Mansfield had one son, Guy Mansfield, who was autistic.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1936
    Age 17
    Although her parents hoped she would enter college, Susann left for New York City after graduating from West Philadelphia High School in 1936, to pursue an acting career.
    More Details Hide Details In New York, Susann landed varied parts in movies, plays (such as The Women) and commercials. She met a press agent, Irving Mansfield (né Mandelbaum), who impressed her by placing items and photos of her in theater and society sections of New York newspapers.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1918
    Born
    Born on August 20, 1918.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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